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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 638

post #9556 of 19050

guys, how, and how often do you clean your suede shoes?

post #9557 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

How regularly, if I may ask? I have a pair of EGs which I wore around 70 times and water starts to seep through

I have no sense of "70" times...under what conditions? In what terrain?

I have shoes/boots that I wear every day on concrete and will have to replace the outsoles at least once or twice a year. I figure I get roughly 9 months out of a pair of good outsoles.

Examine your outsoles--are there any holes in the leather? Any really thin spots? any stitching coming loose? If "none of the above," then the shoes should not be leaking with incidental exposure to rainwater. Bearing in mind that leather is not plastic and will absorb water and will leak with enough exposure, the only answer I can think of is that the quality is not there--cheaper, lower quality leather may have a less dense, more open structured fiber mat..
post #9558 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I have no sense of "70" times...under what conditions? In what terrain?

I have shoes/boots that I wear every day on concrete and will have to replace the outsoles at least once or twice a year. I figure I get roughly 9 months out of a pair of good outsoles.

Examine your outsoles--are there any holes in the leather? Any really thin spots? any stitching coming loose? If "none of the above," then the shoes should not be leaking with incidental exposure to rainwater. Bearing in mind that leather is not plastic and will absorb water and will leak with enough exposure, the only answer I can think of is that the quality is not there--cheaper, lower quality leather may have a less dense, more open structured fiber mat..

Thanks DWFII. Normal city wear in Hong Kong and I don't walk a lot, just taking public transport to and from work in mostly dry conditions.

There are no holes nor really thin spots. Machine channelled stitchings - the stitches have not yet been exposed. So not really a lot of wear.
post #9559 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I have no sense of "70" times...under what conditions? In what terrain?

I have shoes/boots that I wear every day on concrete and will have to replace the outsoles at least once or twice a year. I figure I get roughly 9 months out of a pair of good outsoles.

Examine your outsoles--are there any holes in the leather? Any really thin spots? any stitching coming loose? If "none of the above," then the shoes should not be leaking with incidental exposure to rainwater. Bearing in mind that leather is not plastic and will absorb water and will leak with enough exposure, the only answer I can think of is that the quality is not there--cheaper, lower quality leather may have a less dense, more open structured fiber mat..

People have told me I wear through shoes fast and I always thought it as more normal. I pretty much go through soles in about a year for my normal rotation. That's walking on concrete and a lot. It doesn't bother me.
post #9560 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


People have told me I wear through shoes fast and I always thought it as more normal. I pretty much go through soles in about a year for my normal rotation. That's walking on concrete and a lot. It doesn't bother me.

i think the most important is to enjoy your shoes and be happy!! nothing less

post #9561 of 19050
When I'm spit shining shoes I always get slightly different reults; sometimes better and some times slightly less good.
Method is always the same. Anyone here have any ideas on what the variables may be? The cloth used? room temperature?

When I say 'less good' I mean that sometimes there are smears or micro scratches on the glazing. Sometimes they disappear to leave a crips, clear shine and sometimes they are impossible to get rid of.

Tips?
post #9562 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

When I'm spit shining shoes I always get slightly different reults; sometimes better and some times slightly less good.
Method is always the same. Anyone here have any ideas on what the variables may be? The cloth used? room temperature?

When I say 'less good' I mean that sometimes there are smears or micro scratches on the glazing. Sometimes they disappear to leave a crips, clear shine and sometimes they are impossible to get rid of.

Tips?

Personally I feel that with any craft that is by hand results will always vary. Process maybe the same but how about the amount of wax you happen to get each dip, the pressure or speed. Though they may feel the same small variances exist which will effect the final product. I say just do your best and practice makes proficient
post #9563 of 19050
I've tried a lot of variations* trying to pinpoint the variable that causes the difference but to no avail (so far).
Trying and re-trying will eventually give the same result but I'm looking for (pointers to) an approach that is less trail-and-error based.


*more/less wax, faster/slower rubbing, more/less water, etc.
post #9564 of 19050
My guess is how much of the solvent has evaporated out of the wax you're using as well as humidity level. Temperature too.
post #9565 of 19050
Yeah, probably better when cold as solubles will be less 'runny'. Temperature is kinda hard to influence though (no airco).
I'll try more rest between layers.
post #9566 of 19050

^ I dont know about other sources of variation, but in my experience micro-scratches on the finish (glazing?) appear when there's a little excess polish still left, so there's a little buffing needed, preferably with a clean cloth (the heat from the micro-abrasion will melt the polish a little and even it out, while also taking off the excess).

post #9567 of 19050
Further buffing will generally not make the micro scratches disappear. It is not that more buffing is needed but something else.

Some examples. Note the difference in clarity of the reflection of the window frame on the toe cap between the right and the left shoe.





post #9568 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

When I'm spit shining shoes I always get slightly different reults; sometimes better and some times slightly less good.
Method is always the same. Anyone here have any ideas on what the variables may be? The cloth used? room temperature?

When I say 'less good' I mean that sometimes there are smears or micro scratches on the glazing. Sometimes they disappear to leave a crips, clear shine and sometimes they are impossible to get rid of.

Tips?


There may always be something wrong with the shoe or the existing polish on the shoe itself.

post #9569 of 19050
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crat View Post

I've tried a lot of variations* trying to pinpoint the variable that causes the difference but to no avail (so far).
Trying and re-trying will eventually give the same result but I'm looking for (pointers to) an approach that is less trail-and-error based.


*more/less wax, faster/slower rubbing, more/less water, etc.

Have you tried using some rubbing alcohol in your water? I've not gone that far but I have read it helps to get a consistent shine. Clearly you already know how to do it but it might bring the consistency you're looking for. Just a thought.
post #9570 of 19050
Tried that but it doesn't work too well. Not with pure alcohol. I do find I get a better shine when I'm drinking smile.gif
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