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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 637

post #9541 of 19067
I don't know guys. I live in NYC and I walk a lot, my commute to the train and home is enough to get good and soaked when it is raining and I just use good ole' oak bark. I have a few pairs of dedicated rain shoes. I put in trees, let them sit on their sides to dry and them give them an application of Lexol when they dry out. No harm no foul.
post #9542 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post
 

one of my topy-ed shoes got a bunch of mold growing out the sides from retaining water

 

:eek:

post #9543 of 19067
So when shoes are a bit wet from light rain, just simply put them in shoe shoes and place them on the side to dry out? Lexol to finish it up the next day? I think you mentioned GK cream polish functions the same way as Lexol right, in that you only need either one of them and not both.
post #9544 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I don't know guys. I live in NYC and I walk a lot, my commute to the train and home is enough to get good and soaked when it is raining and I just use good ole' oak bark. I have a few pairs of dedicated rain shoes. I put in trees, let them sit on their sides to dry and them give them an application of Lexol when they dry out. No harm no foul.

Just so I'm on the same page, by Lexol, you mean this, right?

post #9545 of 19067
Yeah, I put lexol on the soles. As far as GlenKaren on the uppers after it rains probably makes sense, that or Lexol. Lexol isn't a polish though, a pure emulsion of oil so you're not going to get a shine from putting lexol on uppers. GlenKaren is a polish, a polish that happens to have a good amount of oil in it.
post #9546 of 19067
Decades ago the top lifts were all leather. Leather wears quickly on pavement and concrete.
The idea of a combination (leather/rubber) top lift came about so that the consumer would get the "feel" of walking on leather and the benefit of better wear with the rubber at the strike point of the top lift.
I still have customers telling me that they like the look of the combination top lift rather than all rubber.
Several have told me that when they cross their legs during a meeting it looks more classy.
post #9547 of 19067

Patrick, why do you put Lexol on the soles of your shoes?  What does it do for them?

post #9548 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Several have told me that when they cross their legs during a meeting it looks more classy.

 

As reinforcement for this, all of AE's higher-end shoes (Independence collection and shells) have the combination heel.

post #9549 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Patrick, why do you put Lexol on the soles of your shoes?  What does it do for them?

I only do it after they dry from walking in wet weather. In my mind it replaces some of the fatliquor that gets lost during the exposure to the elements. Does it do anything? No idea, but it eases my mind. I don't do it otherwise because as DW has said in the past anything that makes the leather softer is going to also make it wear faster, so I only do it after some sort of exposure.
post #9550 of 19067

Thanks for that, Patrick. 

post #9551 of 19067

Sorry, error. 

post #9552 of 19067
I treat my soles occasionally with leather honey for the same purpose.
post #9553 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsgleason View Post

I treat my soles occasionally with leather honey for the same purpose.

The Lexol will dry, leaving no greasy residue. I only vaguely recall seeing using Leather Honey but my recollection is that it is lanolin or tallow or oil based. If so, your outsoles will just get softer and softer as time goes by and wear faster and faster. Some of the most long wearing leather outsoles I've seen over the years were never treated with anything.

I don't put any product on my leather outsoles but I'm under no illusion about what leather is and what its limitations are. I expect to have to replace the leather outsole regularly.
post #9554 of 19067

Should I clean my winter shoes and apply them with Renovateur and shoe wax if I am going to storage them over summer?

post #9555 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

The Lexol will dry, leaving no greasy residue. I only vaguely recall seeing using Leather Honey but my recollection is that it is lanolin or tallow or oil based. If so, your outsoles will just get softer and softer as time goes by and wear faster and faster. Some of the most long wearing leather outsoles I've seen over the years were never treated with anything.

I don't put any product on my leather outsoles but I'm under no illusion about what leather is and what its limitations are. I expect to have to replace the leather outsole regularly.

How regularly, if I may ask? I have a pair of EGs which I wore around 70 times and water starts to seep through
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