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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 623

post #9331 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

Unless of course brass nails are used.
Brass being a softer metal will wear at pretty much the same rate as the leather lift.
Because of that they won't slip or make noise.


Which brings us back to my original response to munky--leather toplifts will wear faster than rubber.
post #9332 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

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Which brings us back to my original response to munky--leather toplifts will wear faster than rubber.

No dispute intended....
Some like to know all of the pros and cons of their options.
post #9333 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scottyb06 View Post

Question: I have 11 pairs of AE shoes and have always used shoe trees, cleaner/conditioner, and the appropriate colored AE polish for my shoes (sans suede shoes).  Is there any real benefit for trying out Saphir?  Will that get me anything that the AE polish doesn't already?  I love the look of a patinated (sp?) leather!

I dont think so...
post #9334 of 19038

After a first polish (I am just a newbie to this stuff).  Looks a bit better than before.

 

post #9335 of 19038

Thank you, gents, for your comments on my posting about heels. Two issues. First, what is a 'topllift'? Is it the top facing of the heel?

 

Second (and I have referred to this before) : what happens when shoe manufacturers offer a re-sole and re-heel package, as long as no third party has repaired the shoes? Surely, most people are going to wear out their 'quarter rubber' heels quicker than their soles and you can hardly be expected to wait until both your soles and heels have worn out, before you send them off for repair. 

post #9336 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by medinfoto View Post
 

After a first polish (I am just a newbie to this stuff).  Looks a bit better than before.

 

 

Don't forget the sole edges!

post #9337 of 19038
A quick question: I don't use wax on cordovan, so which shoe cream is best suited for Horween's whiskey shell cordovan? I'd like to hide a few scuffs but not lose the nice shade.
post #9338 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Thank you, gents, for your comments on my posting about heels. Two issues. First, what is a 'topllift'? Is it the top facing of the heel?

Second (and I have referred to this before) : what happens when shoe manufacturers offer a re-sole and re-heel package, as long as no third party has repaired the shoes? Surely, most people are going to wear out their 'quarter rubber' heels quicker than their soles and you can hardly be expected to wait until both your soles and heels have worn out, before you send them off for repair. 

I think I remember you asking this about the toe of a shoe as well. I don't know how popular this is but I often have a local cobbler apply a plastic shim/spacer on the heel over the worn rubber, it costs $2 and extends the life significantly. And they can easily be replaced. It's kidney shaped and thicker on the top/longer curve so if your rubber heel is quite worn it will fit right in and create an even heel again.

They may however interrupt the look of the bottom of your shoe, so if that is a concern of yours this may not be a great option.
post #9339 of 19038

Two year old Alden color 8 Perf. Cap Toe boot. I love how #8 shell lightens over time. I conditioned these with Lexol before and after the winter. The year before that, they got renovateur a few times.

 

 

 

 

And here's the "Before Pic". I was on a "bull the toe" of everything kick at the time. I used reno to blend in the mirror type shine on the toe not long after applying wax to them. Since this experiment when they were new, they've seen just conditioner, damp cloth to remove salt and light brushing after each wear.

 

 

post #9340 of 19038
^very nice

Color 8 ages so well
post #9341 of 19038

Hi.

I've recently finished reading this entire shoe care thread and now i have a shoe care question! Recently decided to buy a pair of Saint Crispin's. The Saint Crispin's shoe care guide on their website says to wash the shoes using saddle soap. It seems like I've read posts here where use of saddle soap is discouraged. My inclination is to follow the manufacturers instructions, but I thought I would ask first - does anyone have any thoughts (or better yet, experience) re use of saddle soap on Saint Crispin's? My shoes are the cru finish.

 

Thanks. And thanks again for all of the interesting and entertaining reading! 

post #9342 of 19038
So I got some gum and other crud from the bars I went to on the bottom of my shoe. Any tips on how to clean the sole? Not sure it's a good idea to put my nice shoes in my freezer to remove the gum.
post #9343 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ironist View Post

So I got some gum and other crud from the bars I went to on the bottom of my shoe. Any tips on how to clean the sole? Not sure it's a good idea to put my nice shoes in my freezer to remove the gum.

Depends on how patient you want to be.

Crud? Wipe/dust/brush off.

Gum? (a) struggle to prise off when tacky and leave annoying residue... (b) leave for a few days to dry out, it then just pings off with the flick of a knife.
post #9344 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Thank you, gents, for your comments on my posting about heels. Two issues. First, what is a 'topllift'? Is it the top facing of the heel?

 

Second (and I have referred to this before) : what happens when shoe manufacturers offer a re-sole and re-heel package, as long as no third party has repaired the shoes? Surely, most people are going to wear out their 'quarter rubber' heels quicker than their soles and you can hardly be expected to wait until both your soles and heels have worn out, before you send them off for repair. 

 

The top lift is the top layer of the heel, or the layer of that contacts the ground.  It's referred to as the top because the heel stack is constructed while the shoe is upside down (naturally).  The part of the heel that contacts the upper is the heel base, or heel seat. 

 

When you send shoes back to manufacturers for a full "recraft", they replace everything below the insole (some better manufacturers will even replace the insole if needed).  So, they rip off the old heel (the entire stack), the sole, the welt, and scrape out the old cork.  All of this is then replaced with new materials.  Most of them offer a partial option to just replace the heel. 

post #9345 of 19038

Thank you, Money, that's really useful.

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