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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 614

post #9196 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Might work but only under the following circumstances:

Soak shoes in a mixture of three eggs, 3/4 cup of milk, 1/4 teaspoon of salt, 1/4 teaspoon of bourbon vanilla and 2 tablespoons of sugar. Mix ingredients together so that sugar is absorbed and the liquid turns yellow.

Fry with butter in a pan at 300° until nicely browned.

Slather with warm maple syrup and enjoy.

You wrote this so lucidly and distinctly, it is like you might work at an IHOP on the weekends or something. Is there another side to you that you're not telling us about?
Edited by patrickBOOTH - 5/6/14 at 6:42am
post #9197 of 19067

Does that recipe work on cordovan too?? I love some good ole horse!

post #9198 of 19067
Best use of Maple Syrup is on the inside of new/and or used creaking shoes...

No More Creaking!
post #9199 of 19067




Anyone think these cracks/splitting are a cause for concern?

I've had the shoes for about 6 months and wear them tell a week.
post #9200 of 19067
To me it just looks like cracks in the wax finish on the shoe. I wouldn't worry about it. You can put some cream polish over it and it might help. If it really bugs you you could probably use some renomat to strip it and reapply the finish.
post #9201 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsuo View Post

Anyone think these cracks/splitting are a cause for concern?

I've had the shoes for about 6 months and wear them tell a week.

That is nothing to be concerned about.

What you're seeing is the channel that has been cut into the outsole to hide the stitching. It needs to be opened, the shoe stitched and then it needs to be closed back down. But in order for it to stay closed the maker must glue or cement the channel.

Many makers (myself included) would prefer to avoid solvent based adhesives. All that's left, then, are pastes and glues that need clamping and are often water-based. They don't hold very long or very well when exposed to the environment, IOW.

If it is really bothering you, take it to a cobbler and have him slip some All-Purpose cement into the channel, and hammer it when dry.
post #9202 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

You wrote this so lucidly and distinctly, it is like you might work at an IHOP on the weekends or something. Is there another side to you that you're not telling us about?

No...with me, WYSIWYG.

That recipe is mine own variation of an ancient and venerable Traditional recipe for "le pain grillé Français de cordonnier" from the rare tome Le livre de recettes de B. Crocker

But I'm sure it would work for day old French calf as well.

--
Edited by DWFII - 5/6/14 at 11:18am
post #9203 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

That is nothing to be concerned about.

What you're seeing is the channel that has been cut into the outsole to hide the stitching. It needs to be opened, the shoe stitched and then it needs to be closed back down. But in order for it to stay closed the maker must glue or cement the channel.

Many makers (myself included) would prefer to avoid solvent based adhesives. All that's left, then, are pastes and glues that need clamping and are often water-based. They don't hold very long or very well when exposed to the environment, IOW.

If it is really bothering you, take it to a cobbler and have him slip some All-Purpose cement into the channel, and hammer it when dry.

Thank you for this! I figured it was nothing major, just noticed it when I was giving some attention the the waists. I might head to a professional if I decide to sell the shoes though.
post #9204 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Itsuo View Post


Thank you for this! I figured it was nothing major, just noticed it when I was giving some attention the the waists. I might head to a professional if I decide to sell the shoes though.


Itsuo...are those a pair of G&G?

 

I have had this problem on every single pair of G&G that I own...G&G clearly needs to find an alternative as it is not working well...

 

I take them to my local cobbler and he glues/cements them and hammers it down and it seems to be working fine.

post #9205 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post


Itsuo...are those a pair of G&G?

I have had this problem on every single pair of G&G that I own...G&G clearly needs to find an alternative as it is not working well...

I take them to my local cobbler and he glues/cements them and hammers it down and it seems to be working fine.

They are absolutely G&Gs. I hadn't noticed it previously, and while it may not be a huge deal it's just more ammunition for my decision to leave them. shog[1].gif
post #9206 of 19067

True...it doesn't bother me that much...cause its an easy fix.

 

I still think G&G are better and hold up better than StC

post #9207 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post


I have had this problem on every single pair of G&G that I own...G&G clearly needs to find an alternative as it is not working well...
While true enough, I suspect that every manufacturer/maker that offers a clean, smooth outsole (no visible stitch line) suffers this problem to one degree or another...frequently.

In this instance, it's the materials rather than the technique, although it is often the other way around. But it's also symptomatic of the manufacturing sector/mentality and virtually inevitable. Competition breeds expediency...except in very rare instances.
post #9208 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post

I still think G&G are better and hold up better than StC

Well, you would be objectively wrong.
post #9209 of 19067

I am not sure someone can be 'objectively wrong' about the difference between G&G and St C.,Patrick,  given that you have previously stated a preference for St C,s. Come to that, I am not sure that 'objectivity' plays a huge part in shoe preference, except at the extremes of the market. 

post #9210 of 19067
Because they are better constructed shoes and aren't gemmed? I would say that is pretty objective.
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