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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 612

post #9166 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

How do these 'send back to the manufacturers for a complete change of sole and heel' deals, work? I would have thought that heels always wear out more quickly than soles (although I stand to be corrected on this). Given that shoe manufacturers usually stipulate that they won't work on your soles and heels if you have already had the cobblers look at them, how do you get around worn heels?  Do you just have to walk around with worn heals until a hole appears in your soles?

Or until a hole appears in your soul, perhaps. 

I have noticed if you get decently quality heels (which come on good brand shoes) you pretty much get a hole around the same time as your heels are looking shabby. Then again it depends on a lot of things just as the thickness of the sole and such, but many cobblers and shoemakers say that you shouldn't be wearing your soles down to get a hole in the first place.
post #9167 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

How do these 'send back to the manufacturers for a complete change of sole and heel' deals, work? I would have thought that heels always wear out more quickly than soles (although I stand to be corrected on this). Given that shoe manufacturers usually stipulate that they won't work on your soles and heels if you have already had the cobblers look at them, how do you get around worn heels?  Do you just have to walk around with worn heals until a hole appears in your soles?

 

Or until a hole appears in your soul, perhaps. 

 

This probably varies by shoemaker, but Allen Edmonds will replace just the heels on their shoes: http://www.allenedmonds.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/RecraftingView?catalogId=40000000001&langId=-1&storeId=1

 

I don't know if heels wear out before any other part of the shoe. My guess is that it probably depends on your gait and the way the shoe fits your foot. Some people say that the toes of their shoes wear out before anything else. 

post #9168 of 19061

Thanks for your thoughts on this, guys. I have noticed that I am quite good at wearing out the tips of my shoes, by having them frequently caught in paving stones. 

 

I suspect that companies count on not too many people taking up the offer...but are able to demonstrate how 'customer friendly' they are. 

 

Walking being what it is, I can't imagine the whole of a heel and sole wearing out at the same time. 

post #9169 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


No it doesn't. I probably would have put a light coat of GlenKaren conditioner cleaner over them, let them dry for 10 minutes, brushed like crazy, let sit another 10 minutes and them used wax paste on the toe and heel. Then again, every instance of "vintage" shell I have encountered has been very strange in texture most likely to being very dry. New shell behaves very differently.

 

Good to know. I'll check out the GlenKaren conditioner then. 

 

I've got a couple of shoes that are vintage shell. One pair dating to the mid-90s, this one dating to the late 60s. The only texture variation I've seen is in the "valley" part of the rolls that shell are so famous for. I've not seen much variation other than that, but my experience is somewhat limited. Neither pair were particularly dry, in my opinion.

post #9170 of 19061
Vintage shell looks very plasticy compared to what I see on new shell (minus Alden who shellacks their shell).
post #9171 of 19061

Apologies for the derail....

 

but can I use shoe polish to polish belts? I've a few AE belts that are now showing scuffing/wear and wanted to know.

 

Thanks

post #9172 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by namdaemun View Post
 

Apologies for the derail....

 

but can I use shoe polish to polish belts? I've a few AE belts that are now showing scuffing/wear and wanted to know.

 

Thanks

 

I asked the manager of my local AE store the same question. He said you can, but be careful of it staining your clothes. I haven't tried it. 

post #9173 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Vintage shell looks very plasticy compared to what I see on new shell (minus Alden who shellacks their shell).

This is very true. When I got my vintage florsheim imperials off ebay, they arrived and I thought I'd been had b/c of how "fake" and plasticky the uppers looked.
post #9174 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Thanks, Benhour! I've learned a lot from you over the past months! Regards, Munky.

You make me blush dear friend !! always happy to help  and share!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Oils and conditioners are dirt magnets the way a man in a kilt* is a chick magnet.
 

 

so i ll use them to make my shoes dirtproof....... hahaha

btw like the traditional "outfit" of places along the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Awesome knees!

really happy to see that the "craziness" in that thread isn't lost

 

some pics of a project i recently started for the crazy guys here

 

 

edit(adding pictures)


Edited by benhour - 5/3/14 at 7:37am
post #9175 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by El Argentino View Post


This is very true. When I got my vintage florsheim imperials off ebay, they arrived and I thought I'd been had b/c of how "fake" and plasticky the uppers looked.

Are they cordovans? Shells can look that way (especially when over polished).

post #9176 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterFu View Post

Are they cordovans? Shells can look that way (especially when over polished).

Yes, they're cordo. And they were overpolished. Also about 40 years old at least and very dry.
post #9177 of 19061

If the uppers squeak by squeezing it together, is it because the leather is too stiff? Would using Lexol benefit? I would rather apply the lexol on the inside to prevent darkening of the uppers. 

post #9178 of 19061
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

If the uppers squeak by squeezing it together, is it because the leather is too stiff? Would using Lexol benefit? I would rather apply the lexol on the inside to prevent darkening of the uppers. 

Unless it's Lexol-NF (neatsfoot formula), it won't darken the upper.

The reason leather creaks is leather rubbing/sliding across leather. If the creak comes from the area of the insole/outsole, there may be no help for it. If it comes from the upper it may go away as the shoe breaks in.

FWIW..."creaking" is the proper term and was once considered desirable as a signifier of new shoes.
post #9179 of 19061

Thanks for the correction. 

 

So it looks like it's unnecessary to apply Lexol to mitigate the creaking sounds then?

 

Never knew creaking was something desirable, but definitely very interesting to know!  

 

 

EDIT: 

 

DWFII

 

You're definitely spot on. The creaking was due to the tongue rubbing on the other parts of the leather (that never happened to any of my other shoes though) Hopefully this will go away with wear. Thanks. 


Edited by JezeC - 5/4/14 at 10:36am
post #9180 of 19061


Had a nice time in the park with my Butteros yesterday and noticed a few scratches and little discoloration on the side of the shoe. Not sure how it happened, but any ideas on getting the color back to normal? I have light and medium brown Saphir creams but afraid to use it for spot treatment and get into more trouble.

Any ideas?
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