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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 604

post #9046 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCer View Post


Excuse my ignorance, but what is "glassing"? Curious...and always looking for new ways to maintain my shoes...
Quote:
Originally Posted by jssdc View Post
 

 

Should have been more clear: I do the sole edge at the same time I do the uppers, and since my regimen includes both cream and wax I use both on the sole edges. And you're absolutely correct that cream does a way better job covering over scuffs.

 

I'd be interested in learning about more sophisticated edge treatments such as the "glassing" you mention above.  

 

Its not for maintenance.  Stick with diluted dyes or shoe creams.

 

 

post #9047 of 19067

i prefer to brush my shoes when they are warm after wear because i find that it easily smooths the polish back over scuffs and scrapes and any smudges on my high shined toes...

post #9048 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post


I'm not exaggerating, rather you are questioning the effectiveness and doubting what I have to say, or in essence trying to call me a liar. I'm not and neither a snob like you who calls every RTW shoe pedestrian as if Bespoke shoe is end of this world.

 

Misleading.

post #9049 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

i prefer to brush my shoes when they are warm after wear because i find that it easily smooths the polish back over scuffs and scrapes and any smudges on my high shined toes...

 

+1 

 

I find that I actually go a relatively long time between shines (or applying any other product) because brushing after wear is so effective at spreading the polish.  Given the concern about over-use of shoe products and the impact that this has on longevity I feel that this is a very good thing.

post #9050 of 19067
That makes sense.
post #9051 of 19067
Would Saphir Greasy Leather Cream be good for replenishing dry, darker colored, shell cordovan? It is recommended for CXL.

Saphir Greasy Leather Cream is designed for oiled leathers, such as Horween's Chromexel. These leathers are infused with oils during the tanning process and are distinguished for their rugged, natural look. Most often used for hiking, mountain, and boat shoes, oiled leathers are typically a dark brown or reddish-brown and never waxed.

Normal shoe polishes are not appropriate for use on oiled leather because of their waxes. Applying a traditional waxed polish would completely change the look of the leather. To nourish and renew oiled leathers, Saphir Greasy Leather Cream (Cr̬me Cuirs Gras) should be exclusively used.
post #9052 of 19067
I would use Saphir's dedicated Cordovan cream. It is infused with neatsfoot oil. It works very well, ime.
post #9053 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Misleading.

no, ur statements are dubious.
post #9054 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Deacon View Post


Normal shoe polishes are not appropriate for use on oiled leather because of their waxes. Applying a traditional waxed polish would completely change the look of the leather. To nourish and renew oiled leathers, Saphir Greasy Leather Cream (Cr̬me Cuirs Gras) should be exclusively used.

Are you talking of paste waxes or creams? Paste wax is fine for cordovan, creams are no no, even though I personally think they are fine. I saw a video somewhere here where Ron Ryder mixes ordinary shoe cream with Reno for cordovan.
post #9055 of 19067
I use glenkaren cream on my cordovan with great results. Whatever bozo originally said no cream on cordovan, which became gospel is an idiot.
post #9056 of 19067

It seems like a lot of the "just brush and nothing else" so-called rules are based on experiences with Alden's style of cordovan, with a whole bunch of lacquer or whatever it is on top.  I have a pair like this (vintage Hanover, not Alden but same style) and while I'm wholly convinced that shoe cream would do them no harm there doesn't seem to be a need.  For other cordovan shoes with less shit on top I've treated them more or less like calf.

post #9057 of 19067
I agree, that it could be an Alden thing. They put that weird paint over it.

I think this is what started it: http://www.alden-of-carmel.com/care_of_shell_cordovan.htm
post #9058 of 19067

I am finding that the less I polish my shoes, the less i need to. I brush them before I put them on and that always seems to bring out a deep sheen. There will no doubt be times when I have to clean and polish them but they really do seem to be better without regularly polishing them. The only exception to this is the edge of my Loake Chesters. Being double soled, the edge of the soles get scuffed fairly easily. Saphir's edging cream takes care of this. Whatever. The manager and owner of my local men's shoe shop admired the patina of my brogues.

post #9059 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by gyasih View Post

Do you gents use a different brush for buffing after applying Renovateur and buffing/polishing after applying wax or cream?

To avoid cross-contamination between different  creams and waxes, I use dedicated applicants, brushes, and clothes - marked with a Sharpie Pen - and in an open air zip-lock bag for easy retrieval .

 

All my best,


David

post #9060 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I agree, that it could be an Alden thing. They put that weird paint over it.

I think this is what started it: http://www.alden-of-carmel.com/care_of_shell_cordovan.htm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

I am finding that the less I polish my shoes, the less i need to. I brush them before I put them on and that always seems to bring out a deep sheen. There will no doubt be times when I have to clean and polish them but they really do seem to be better without regularly polishing them. The only exception to this is the edge of my Loake Chesters. Being double soled, the edge of the soles get scuffed fairly easily. Saphir's edging cream takes care of this. Whatever. The manager and owner of my local men's shoe shop admired the patina of my brogues.

 

Shoe care really depends on the type of the leather. 

 

For unfinished leather (crust) like G&G, Berluti or C&J, polishes are needed to bring out a shine. 

For finished leather (box calf, museum calf, etc) like JLP and Vass, light cream is good enough. 

For finished leather with heavy factory top coats like Alden or those heavy corrected grain shoes, brushing alone is fine.

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