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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 594

post #8896 of 19059

I like burgundy wax polish on my burgundy shoes. However, many people use black on them...I have tried this...I think its ok.

 

I use the same brush for every color...

post #8897 of 19059
I can't speak for pB, but I'm going to answer that simply to give you a little different perspective...

I don't think any current product answers to every issue that arises with shoe care. Some have toxic or noxious chemicals in them. Some leave sticky residues. Some are too harsh, some too mild. This applies across the board--from conditioners to polishes to creams to what-have-you.

Then too the chemicals and formulas change as the years go by and the government or well-meaning busy-bodies force changes for environmental or tender-heart reasons. So where I started out with Lexol years ago...and at that time it was probably closer to a lanolin and/or vat liquor emulsion...as the years have gone by the recipe has changed. Rider said recently that Lexol is adding more water to its formula.

Years ago polish (some of them anyway) had benzine in it...we knew what it would do. How it would react. now the benzine is mostly gone as I understand it and every manufacturer went scratching for a reasonable substitute.

Some polishes are better than others for achieving a high shine. Six months later the recipe has changed and now that polish is no longer the same. Or six months later another brand changes their formula and now it is top of its class.

And no one knows what's in any of this stuff. The manufacturers guard the formulas like it was the Classic Coke recipe. So no consumer has enough information to make an informed decision.

And add to that the fact that every consumer wants something a little different from these products and every consumer is torn by the advertising claims and willingly buys into the hype--no one has ever spelled out to me what the difference between a reptile conditioner and calf conditioner is. Sure one product might have an additional ingredient or more of it, but no way to tell if that difference is critical. I suspect it is not. Leather is, after all leather.

IOW, I suspect that you could use Lexol and Meltonian cream on calf, cordovan, lizard, and veg tanned bridle leather with equally good result and equal to, or better than, any product that is hyped as leather specific.
post #8898 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I can't speak for pB, but I'm going to answer that simply to give you a little different perspective...

I don't think any current product answers to every issue that arises with shoe care. Some have toxic or noxious chemicals in them. Some leave sticky residues. Some are too harsh, some too mild. This applies across the board--from conditioners to polishes to creams to what-have-you.

Then too the chemicals and formulas change as the years go by and the government or well-meaning busy-bodies force changes for environmental or tender-heart reasons. So where I started out with Lexol years ago...and at that time it was probably closer to a lanolin and/or vat liquor emulsion...as the years have gone by the recipe has changed. Rider said recently that Lexol is adding more water to its formula.

Years ago polish (some of them anyway) had benzine in it...we knew what it would do. How it would react. now the benzine is mostly gone as I understand it and every manufacturer went scratching for a reasonable substitute.

Some polishes are better than others for achieving a high shine. Six months later the recipe has changed and now that polish is no longer the same. Or six months later another brand changes their formula and now it is top of its class.

And no one knows what's in any of this stuff. The manufacturers guard the formulas like it was the Classic Coke recipe. So no consumer has enough information to make an informed decision.

And add to that the fact that every consumer wants something a little different from these products and every consumer is torn by the advertising claims and willingly buys into the hype--no one has ever spelled out to me what the difference between a reptile conditioner and calf conditioner is. Sure one product might have an additional ingredient or more of it, but no way to tell if that difference is critical. I suspect it is not. Leather is, after all leather.

IOW, I suspect that you could use Lexol and Meltonian cream on calf, cordovan, lizard, and veg tanned bridle leather with equally good result and equal to, or better than, any product that is hyped as leather specific.


Thank you.

 

Do you believe conditioner is necessary for shoe care ? Presuming the shoe is being kept clean via regular brushing / wiping with moist cloth plus receives shoe cream every month or so. Does the type of climate you stay in have an impact on whether you should use conditioner ?

 

I ask because I find using conditioners such as saphir / AE conditioner & cleaner made the leather on my shoes very dry. I had to apply 2-3 layers of shoe cream to bring some life back into the leather (how readily the leather absorbed the cream was also a bit concerning). I haven't tried lexol but I have read some stories on it messing up finishes (which would be a bigger problem for antiquated brown shoes vs black)

post #8899 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

I can't speak for pB, but I'm going to answer that simply to give you a little different perspective...

I don't think any current product answers to every issue that arises with shoe care. Some have toxic or noxious chemicals in them. Some leave sticky residues. Some are too harsh, some too mild. This applies across the board--from conditioners to polishes to creams to what-have-you.

Then too the chemicals and formulas change as the years go by and the government or well-meaning busy-bodies force changes for environmental or tender-heart reasons. So where I started out with Lexol years ago...and at that time it was probably closer to a lanolin and/or vat liquor emulsion...as the years have gone by the recipe has changed. Rider said recently that Lexol is adding more water to its formula.

Years ago polish (some of them anyway) had benzine in it...we knew what it would do. How it would react. now the benzine is mostly gone as I understand it and every manufacturer went scratching for a reasonable substitute.

Some polishes are better than others for achieving a high shine. Six months later the recipe has changed and now that polish is no longer the same. Or six months later another brand changes their formula and now it is top of its class.

And no one knows what's in any of this stuff. The manufacturers guard the formulas like it was the Classic Coke recipe. So no consumer has enough information to make an informed decision.

And add to that the fact that every consumer wants something a little different from these products and every consumer is torn by the advertising claims and willingly buys into the hype--no one has ever spelled out to me what the difference between a reptile conditioner and calf conditioner is. Sure one product might have an additional ingredient or more of it, but no way to tell if that difference is critical. I suspect it is not. Leather is, after all leather.

IOW, I suspect that you could use Lexol and Meltonian cream on calf, cordovan, lizard, and veg tanned bridle leather with equally good result and equal to, or better than, any product that is hyped as leather specific.

I don't think anyone here is more qualified or could have answered any better. So, first thank you. I believe todays marketing the plethora of misleading information on web goes a long way in adding to the confusion.

Iagree at the end of the day there is very little to differentiate in terms of long term results between a 5$ polish and a 20$ one but we all tend to succumb to the illusion that something that costs more is invariably better. This includes myself and Im still learning.
post #8900 of 19059
Guys can we not quote full post when responding directly below it - it really makes for tedious reading on a mobile device. Especially to then have to scroll it twice in a row! We know your responding to DW, and if you need to make it clear just quote the poster name maybe?

Edit - also a 'conditioner' that leaves leather dry is clearly no conditioner. Throw the stuff away.
post #8901 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chanklebury View Post

Guys can we not quote full post when responding directly below it - it really makes for tedious reading on a mobile device. Especially to then have to scroll it twice in a row! We know your responding to DW, and if you need to make it clear just quote the poster name maybe?

 

Sure :embar:

post #8902 of 19059
Sorry wasn't being harsh, it's just I really hate using an iphone at the best of times, but when trying to browse a forum when it keeps skipping back to the top of the page for some unfathomable reason when I am actually trying to scroll down I am driven to despair!
post #8903 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post


One for dark colors and one for lighter.
post #8904 of 19059

Sorry, but one 'what' for dark and light colours?  Polish, brushes? :embar:

post #8905 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

 

I have a separate brush for each pair. I keep them in their respective shoe boxes and write the polish color on the handle. I use the same brush, however, to buff the shoe before and after the polishing. I realize this is a bit overboard. But if I'm going to put different colored polishes onto a shoe, I'd rather do that intentionally rather than inadvertently via brushing. And, no, I have no evidence that my method protects the shoes any better than those who have fewer brushes. My OCD wins out over logic most days.  

post #8906 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

So why use any?

Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

C'mon you owe us at least an explanation, few pages back you were all gaga about how good GK products are ..and before that Reno, Lexol and what not..
You seem to be contradicting yourself how come?

I was being facetious, but it is half true. Shoe care products suck!
post #8907 of 19059

Might as well use bacon fat.

Plus if you feel peckish you could give 'em a lick.

post #8908 of 19059

Hi guys,

 

I'm looking for an especially mild method of shoe cleaning--anyone got any tips?  Occasionally I'll get a little grease spot or wax buildup on a shoe.  I don't want to use a cream/conditioner that leaves anything behind, and I'd rather not use anything with a solvent that carries any risk of affecting the pigment (so no Renomat or alcohol).  What's the mildest, safest methods for cleaning lightly soiled shoes when a damp cloth won't do?

 

I was thinking of using a product from Leather Master called Soft Cleaner.  (http://www.leatherworldtech.com/Leather-Master-Soft-Cleaner-p/lmsoc.htm)  It's an extremely gentle water-based cleaner with a slight foaming action and a light scent... I've been using it on a nice leather couch for a long time with no ill effect.  I've used this with a soft brush on cheap driving loafers and it's worked fine... the leather initially soaks up the water and darkens, but then it dries clean and looks like new.

 

What do you guys think?  Any problems with that kind of approach on nice shoes?  Better ideas?

post #8909 of 19059
Quote:
Originally Posted by space grey View Post


baby shampoo.
post #8910 of 19059

I found a great, easy (and free) item for producing water drops to use while wax polishing.  A flower water tube.  I bought flowers for my wife the other week and one of the types couldn't be out of water for long so the lady put these plastic tubes over the bottom of the stem.

 

So somehow I realize that because of water solubility only a drop of water falls out of the hole at a time if held upside gently.  Basically the perfect little tool for depositing a drop of water on my polish cloth in between wax applications. 

 

Google flower water tube to see what they are.  And next time you are at the local grocer/florist buying flowers for the loved one make sure to get one of these:

 

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