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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 590

post #8836 of 19067

Just out of curiosity, what would happen if you never put any product on your shoes but only brushed them before and after wearing? Would anything unpleasant happen to them? 

post #8837 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Just out of curiosity, what would happen if you never put any product on your shoes but only brushed them before and after wearing? Would anything unpleasant happen to them? 

if unpleasant things don't happen over an extended amount of time, what is the point of this entire thread?

Surely people gets bumps and scratches, they would use some polish to cover it up, and for most people, that about as far as they go.
post #8838 of 19067

Thank you for this, Wurger. My post wasn't linked to any other. I was just curious, given that many people advocate minimal use of shoe products.

post #8839 of 19067
Probably dried up leather and premature cracking.
post #8840 of 19067

One of my favourite pairs of shoes has developed holes at the inside of the heels (due to friction). Is this considered as a standard repair by any reputable cobbler? Would the cobbler cut and remove a piece of the inner lining, and replace it with an equivalent piece? The other alternative would be to overlay and glue a new piece on which doesn't sound like a proper thing to do. 

post #8841 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yowzer View Post

One of my favourite pairs of shoes has developed holes at the inside of the heels (due to friction). Is this considered as a standard repair by any reputable cobbler? Would the cobbler cut and remove a piece of the inner lining, and replace it with an equivalent piece? The other alternative would be to overlay and glue a new piece on which doesn't sound like a proper thing to do. 

If they overlay a piece, it will make your shoes feel smaller.
post #8842 of 19067

That would be a bad idea Wurger. It's quite a snug fit as it is and I can only wear thin socks. :bored: What is your experience with cobblers in Sydney. Do they carefully remove part of the inner lining at the heel and replace? I imagine it would be a difficult thing to do.

post #8843 of 19067
Not sure, but I am sure they can work something out.
post #8844 of 19067

Time to interview a few cobblers.... be interesting to find out the price....

post #8845 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Thank you for this, Wurger. My post wasn't linked to any other. I was just curious, given that many people advocate minimal use of shoe products.

In all likelihood, if you didn't wear the shoes in the rain, if you didn't get mud or ordure on them, if you didn't scratch them or spill wine or beer on them, or leave them too near the heat or in the back of your car to bake in the sun,etc., you'd get years and years of wear out of them.

Conditioners and polishes exist to counter the deleterious effects of forcing leather to be the interface between yourself and harsh reality. Leather often sits for years rolled up in bins before a manufacture buys it and perhaps years more before it is used to make shoes. No one toils unseen in vast midnight warehouses unrolling those hides one by one and conditioning them. No harm, no foul.
post #8846 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

In all likelihood, if you didn't wear the shoes in the rain, if you didn't get mud or ordure on them, if you didn't scratch them or spill wine or beer on them, or leave them too near the heat or in the back of your car to bake in the sun,etc., you'd get years and years of wear out of them.

Conditioners and polishes exist to counter the deleterious effects of forcing leather to be the interface between yourself and harsh reality. Leather often sits for years rolled up in bins before a manufacture buys it and perhaps years more before it is used to make shoes. No one toils unseen in vast midnight warehouses unrolling those hides one by one and conditioning them. No harm, no foul.

Exactly......we have leathers at the factory that are from the 70's. They are now premium hides and are only used for the highest priced work. We used a bunch of great old bone buck for the Great Gatsby movie's button boots. Studio pays ++ prices, the old leathers are pulled out of the leather room. They don't go bad, just need to be reconditioned a bit. NO factory throws out leather - it doesn't rot on it's own. The environment does that.
post #8847 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by arglist View Post
 

 

I have just placed a large order with Valmour France, among other products ordered two bottles of Juvacuir. Valmour says this product is used for refreshing the existing colour but Ron obviously used this with great success to change the colour as well.

 

I have a pair of Carmina oxfords in tanned grain calf that I don't wear because of their yellowish colour:

 

 

I plan on using light and mid brown Juvacuir to actually darken them slightly. I hesitate to use "teinture française" as this is really hard core stuff and I'm definitely an amateur.

 

Any experiences with Juvacuir? Or other thoughts?

 

Forgive me for bumping this but the answers I got don't fully answer my question. I know that I can darken my shoes by using darker cream polishes or wax; I have done that before. The problem I had with that method was that after some time the lighter colour shone through in the creases which looked very messy.

 

So my question remains: Will Juvacuir be adequate or will I need to buy some teinture française?

post #8848 of 19067

Here is a side-zip boot in what Allen Edmonds calls "polished cobbler":

 

 

I'm pretty certain they won't take a polish, but is there anything I can do to at least condition them?

 

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

post #8849 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by halfnhalfnhalf View Post

Here is a side-zip boot in what Allen Edmonds calls "polished cobbler":




I'm pretty certain they won't take a polish, but is there anything I can do to at least condition them?




Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

Depends on what you put on them. Generally speaking, thin, watery conditioners go into the leather better than pastes or creams. If the shoes can get wet, a conditioners such as Lexol will follow/penetrate.

And if the finish is really dense and/or opaque it will begin to break down and come off as the shoe is worn and it creases. So it will be more open to conditioners in those areas...which are usually the areas that most need conditioning anyway.
post #8850 of 19067
Polished cobbler is, from my understandment, sanded/split and embossed leather which is quite unpenetrateable for conditioners.
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