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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 564

post #8446 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


... The fact remains if you need to put an insole in the shoe to wear it, don't buy it...

 

I completely agree, Patrick.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


...and if you cannot lay a straight-edge along the medial side of your feet and have it touch the foot from heel to the end of the big toe, you've already got some distortion of the fundamental structure and health of the foot.

 

Absolutely, and this in turn is why I am so completely exasperated by nearly all RTW lasts that I see, and similarly cannot comprehend the absurd pointy narrow toe boxes with their hallux deformity inducing outflare that appear so unfathomably popular on here. The suggestion that occasionally rears its errant head that a deeper vamp or sizing up will compensate for frankly an ill fitting narrow toe box is an absurd one. 

 

If it ain't swung, it don't swing with me.

post #8447 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfridman View Post
 

I have a question regarding Kirby's "presidential shine" routine (http://www.hangerproject.com/shoe-care-guide/presidential-shoe-shine-guide)

 

In step 4, application of pommadier cream, he writes "...we recommend applying three successive coats to rebuild the protective wax finish. After using the RENOMAT ...". Now, does that mean that one should apply 1 coat of cream, wait for it to dry, then buff it out, and apply one more, OR one should apply 1 coat, wait for it to dry, and then apply a successive coat on top of the dried one?

 

Avoid those advice like plague.

 

At least wait dry the first coat to let the cream absorb by leather.  Follow on creams you can buff directly.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


You're a natural, pB! You've got it in one.

Unless they are actually orthotics and fit to the shoe as well as your foot, you're asking for trouble.

Yes, people do it. And seemingly get away with it. But as I have said many times, the consequences of a mis-fit will not, in all probability be noticeable until years down the road and no way of going back.

And the other truth is that a good fitting shoe will preserve, and even...to some small extent...correct, foot problems that have developed or are in the process.My wife was developing a fallen metatarsal arch and bunions when I first started making her footwear. I didn't believe it myself but the bunion, at least, never happened.

One thing to consider...most of us are born with perfect feet and we'd keep those feet if we didn't wear shoes. But if you take off your socks and stand upright and look down at your feet...and if you cannot lay a straight-edge along the medial side of your feet and have it touch the foot from heel to the end of the big toe, you've already got some distortion of the fundamental structure and health of the foot.

Most of us do...and a lot of it won't affect you until you're old. But if you have bunions or hammer-toes or a thick, hard callus somewhere under the middle of joint-line of your foot...chances are the damage is done.

At the very least, you're a long way from home.

 

People who grew up wearing feet constraining device will most probably have deformed feet. 

post #8448 of 11406

Goodness, Chanklebury, that's a lot of big words in a row!

post #8449 of 11406

I have had a few beers and am feeling wordy.... my apologies.

Finding a well fitting RTW shoe is the bane of my life (sighs)

post #8450 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


People who grew up wearing feet constraining device will most probably have deformed feet. 

I think that must depend on how you define "feet constraining devices"

I've worn shoes all my life. Started wearing cowboy boots in high school. Wore boots exclusively for the last 40 some years and started wearing shoes about 8 years ago. Now, that's all I wear.

I'm 68 now. Life has had its affect, but...




And


post #8451 of 11406

Why does the big toe and the outside edge of the feet sits out of the sole area?  Just wondering.

post #8452 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Why does the big toe and the outside edge of the feet sits out of the sole area?  Just wondering.

There were several lasts that I was playing with--one wider, one narrower. What you are looking at, with regard to the insole outlines, are bottom papers--a possible insole shape. The last would would be modified to mirror the footprint as close as possible and the insole shape would also be modified accordingly. Not the final insole shape or size, IOW. The final shape was probably somewhere between the green line and the red line.

That said, the big toe will migrate laterally as the heel is raised... of its own accord. And furthermore, the swell of the last above the featherline assures that there will be no pressure on any toe. The shoes made on this last are near as perfect a fit as I could wish for.

Finally, it is perhaps worth remarking that my fitting philosophy holds that the toes should gently, ever so slightly, nestle up against the inside wall of the shoe. If, with weight on, you reach down and feel your foot and can then feel the dorsal surface of the insole anywhere except at the end of your toes (and the toe stiffener should prevent you from feeling the insole in that region), the insole is too wide for the foot. Long experience has shown me that if I made the insole such that the print of the big toes was entirely within the outline of the bottom paper, I would, when done, be able to drive vamp leather with my thumb all the way to the surface of the insole. Not good. That excess/space will never be filled, never go away, and an ugly crease will develop right there.

The shape of the insole can be slightly smaller than the footprint or even, in some areas slightly wider. It depends on the foot. Naturally a more flexible foot allows more latitude in the way the insole is cut than a more rigid foot.

The important point in all this, however, is to look at the foot...my foot...see how it is shaped? No bunions, no hammer toes...no distortion-- virtually the same outline as when I was born.

Now look at the pedograph...all toes printing, no "hot spots" (darker areas indicating fallen metatarsal arches, etc.)--the significance of the pedograph is as one indicator of the health of the foot.

--
Edited by DWFII - 3/14/14 at 7:00am
post #8453 of 11406

Nice shape.

post #8454 of 11406
DWF, thanks for the detailed explanation.

Your foot looks good, no damage or callus.
post #8455 of 11406
Does anyone have suggestions for cleaners for vegetable tanned boots? I'm seeing suggestions for saddle soaps on other sites. Is there a preferred saddle soap for veg tanned leather?

For conditioning, I was going to go with Pecard's as I already have some at home. I have Renovateur too if that might be a better choice.

Thanks guys!
post #8456 of 11406
Don't use saddle soap...it leaves a tallow or glycerine residue which will pick up grit.

Use Lexol-Ph cleaner or a ph-neutral bably shampooo.
post #8457 of 11406
Dwf is right.

I'll probably be accused of heresy, but saddle soap despite its name isn't a very good cleaner, infact it was always more of a leather conditioner than cleaner (hence the addition of glycerin etc).

It has it's fans, but even in the equestrian world those who use it, do so to soften and condition leather, not so much to clean it.
post #8458 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Don't use saddle soap...it leaves a tallow or glycerine residue which will pick up grit.

Use Lexol-Ph cleaner or a ph-neutral bably shampooo.

Doesn't the Lexol bottle say "glycerin-rich" on it? Last time I tried lexol it seemed to almost take color off the shoe in the spot I used it on. What's the best method for using Lexol?
post #8459 of 11406

I have a pair of shoes that I have decided are a horrible colour. They are light tan. I don't have the skills that others have on here, to make artistic changes. What is the minimum I have to do to make them a darker colour?

post #8460 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillardiv View Post

Doesn't the Lexol bottle say "glycerin-rich" on it? Last time I tried lexol it seemed to almost take color off the shoe in the spot I used it on. What's the best method for using Lexol?

It does have glycerine in it, but it's not likely to leave a tacky dust attracting residue due to the other additives within lexol.

Unless your shoes are soiled, since you have it use Reno it should be more than adequate.
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