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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 549

post #8221 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by OREO View Post

I have found in the past that jeans have a tendency to leak dye onto my lighter colored shoes when it rains and as a consequence I don't buy jeans anymore. Is there any assured way i can buy jeans that don't cross contaminate my shoes? (I have found that even fairly expensive jeans leak color on shoes).

Blue in Green in soho in New York sells no-fade denim. They swear it won't leak or fade. Apparently they sourced the same dyes they use on military uniforms and such. Maybe give those a shot? Not sure how many brands incorporate this dye, but the ones that I happened to come across were a joint project between Blue in Green and Pure Blue Japan.
post #8222 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by OREO View Post
 

I have found in the past that jeans have a tendency to leak dye onto my lighter colored shoes when it rains and as a consequence I don't buy jeans anymore. Is there any assured way i can buy jeans that don't cross contaminate my shoes? (I have found that even fairly expensive jeans leak color on shoes).


Lol...this has never been a problem with my shoes...but jeans dye rubs off on the lighter colored leather seats of two of my cars giving them a bluish hue.

 

Thank god detailing gets it out every time.

post #8223 of 10782

Thanks for the advise I'll look into that, but will have to do online because i live in the UK. Luckily it happened to my 'crappy weather boots' but i'm sure many people have had nasty surprises with expensive shoes. 

post #8224 of 10782
Just do what I do and only wear black shoes. Easy peasy.
post #8225 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCer View Post

Question guys: A week or so ago, I took a pretty good stumble coming up the outdoor stairs to the plaza of our building. In the process, I scuffed the pristine toe of my AE Bayfields. Brushed it good, rubbed with some lotion to get moisture back in and have now put some brown polish on. Abrasion seems gone, but I have a dark halo sort of ring on the toe. Any ideas? I'm debating rubbing the whole toecap with black paste wax to darken the whole area on both toes. Ideas?


For those that are interested, I rubbed them down with a little Reno, then put some paste wax on in the correct brown colour, then added a very light coat of black paste wax. The result is slightly darker two caps on the boots, but the 'scar' is almost unnoticeable. I imagine it will continue to disappear and blend into patina over time. I'm happy with the result. I like to keep them a little more formal/polished looking too, as I've got other rough looking boots. What do you guys think?
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post #8226 of 10782
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post #8227 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

Dig the boots.............

Me likey the wholecuts...
post #8228 of 10782

Hey guys! My first time trying GlenKaren, I thought I'd give my review of the stuff.

Stuff I tried:

Black cream polish

Cleaner/conditioner

High-shine paste

My guinea pigs: 
Edward Green black captoes. 

 

TL;DR: BUY THIS STUFF NOW. (Yes, it smells incredible, but works even better!)
 

Used to Lexol, Kiwi, Lincoln wax before this stuff. 
 

Cleaner/conditioner

 

EXTREMELY potent. The orange oil strips away old layers of polish in a way lexol could never manage. The conditioning too is far superior to what I got out of Lexol. Remember to buff the shoes after letting the stuff dry though, as there will be a film of crap that the orange oil has just stripped off the shoes! (On a sidenote, if you're super lazy, you can actually brush that film to a fairly good shine and call it a day) I would not recommend applying it with bare fingers (normally, I did that with lexol) as the stuff is extremely persistent and will take ages to come off. That's not a fault of the product- if anything, it's testament to how damn good the stuff is. 

Black cream

Unlike other black creams I've used, this appears to do very little in the way of restoring color. However, it too nourishes the leather, and the shine I got out of it is unparalleled. You'dve thought I had used wax. 

Wax

The first time I tried this, I was unimpressed. Then, I realized I was using far too much polish, and WOW. I've never been able to see my reflection in a pair of shoes before. 

How to apply: 
 

Take a tiny amount of polish. Halve it. Halve it again. That's still probably more than you need for one coat on the toes. For the first layer, rub hardish to work it into the pores. Rub progressively lighter as the surface gets smoother. I think I needed a single drop of water the whole time. 

 

For buffing and brushing: speed over pressure!

 

My very happy Edward Greens :) 


Also, shout-out to Glen for saving my order from being sent to my old dorm, which is currently being demolished. Thanks man! You've earned a repeat customer for sure!

post #8229 of 10782
A question for any shells experts - and apologies if this may have been addressed elsewhere, I scanned through couple of threads but did not find anything similar - if you can point to the particular discussion it would suffice also.

Brand new pair of shell boots, other than having been worn several times and wiped down with a soft cotton cloth after each wear no other maintenance has been done on the pair. The peculiarity I'm encountering is that the moment I start brushing, especially the toes area, it turns - for lack of a better word - murky/cloudy. The brush is new, purchased specifically for dry brushing these boots after each wear, so that should rule out cross contamination or leftover wax. I have gone through several pieces of cotton cloths buffing the toes to remove any excess oils to where there's no residue being picked up, and reasonably shinny. Yet with any brushing the area will turn matted once again. I can post photos if it will help illustrate the issue.

Any insight/advice would be much appreciated, thanks much in advance.
post #8230 of 10782
Photos might help, but I have found a few things with shell, too much product can cause this, but if that isn't the case sometimes a very, very small dab about half the size of a pea swirled on the toe and buffed with a horsehair brush can revive a shine very well.

Also it is important that you don't brush too hard with shell. The finish doesn't absorb as much with shell because of how non-porous it is so most of it sits on top. Too rigorous of brushing disturbs it and can cause this appearance. Be sure to brush quickly, but with very light pressure.

If the reno doesn't help put a thin layer of wax and buff after it has dried a good deal.
post #8231 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by nemo View Post

A question for any shells experts - and apologies if this may have been addressed elsewhere, I scanned through couple of threads but did not find anything similar - if you can point to the particular discussion it would suffice also.



Brand new pair of shell boots, other than having been worn several times and wiped down with a soft cotton cloth after each wear no other maintenance has been done on the pair. The peculiarity I'm encountering is that the moment I start brushing, especially the toes area, it turns - for lack of a better word - murky/cloudy. The brush is new, purchased specifically for dry brushing these boots after each wear, so that should rule out cross contamination or leftover wax. I have gone through several pieces of cotton cloths buffing the toes to remove any excess oils to where there's no residue being picked up, and reasonably shinny. Yet with any brushing the area will turn matted once again. I can post photos if it will help illustrate the issue.



Any insight/advice would be much appreciated, thanks much in advance.

 



My new brushes does that also. My older Kiwi brush does a better job than the new ones I've purchased from AE.

From my personal experience, If all you want is a shine, I find it best to use a cotton cloth rather than a horse hair brush, which I only occasionaly use to brush away dirt. My horsehair "shine brush" instantly turns my newly shined shoes into matted leather. For me, a cloth is all I really need.
post #8232 of 10782
^^ I find the same to be true with me. It isn't the brushing that produces the shine, it is the buffing with a cloth after. Now I brush lightly to remove loose dirt, wipe with lightly damp cloth then I buff with a cotton cloth. I get the same results as when I sit there and brush for 15 min. like a mad man.
post #8233 of 10782

What? Are we questioning the Mac Method here? :stirpot:

 

In my relatively limited shell collection of just two pairs (and both vintage) I also tend to get the best shine with a cloth and sometimes a bit of paste wax.  However, for care after each wear I've found that brushing is more effective than wiping with a cloth for maintaining the shine.  Not sure precisely why this is but the shell surface (on the vamp at any rate) seems different after I've walked about all day than when it's been sitting in the closet.   

post #8234 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by jssdc View Post

What? Are we questioning the Mac Method here? stirpot.gif

In my relatively limited shell collection of just two pairs (and both vintage) I also tend to get the best shine with a cloth and sometimes a bit of paste wax.  However, for care after each wear I've found that brushing is more effective than wiping with a cloth for maintaining the shine.  Not sure precisely why this is but the shell surface (on the vamp at any rate) seems different after I've walked about all day than when it's been sitting in the closet.   
Usually the flexing and creasing will bring some oils to the surface. Cordovan bloom.
post #8235 of 10782
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by nemo View Post

A question for any shells experts - and apologies if this may have been addressed elsewhere, I scanned through couple of threads but did not find anything similar - if you can point to the particular discussion it would suffice also.



Brand new pair of shell boots, other than having been worn several times and wiped down with a soft cotton cloth after each wear no other maintenance has been done on the pair. The peculiarity I'm encountering is that the moment I start brushing, especially the toes area, it turns - for lack of a better word - murky/cloudy. The brush is new, purchased specifically for dry brushing these boots after each wear, so that should rule out cross contamination or leftover wax. I have gone through several pieces of cotton cloths buffing the toes to remove any excess oils to where there's no residue being picked up, and reasonably shinny. Yet with any brushing the area will turn matted once again. I can post photos if it will help illustrate the issue.



Any insight/advice would be much appreciated, thanks much in advance.

 



My new brushes does that also. My older Kiwi brush does a better job than the new ones I've purchased from AE.

From my personal experience, If all you want is a shine, I find it best to use a cotton cloth rather than a horse hair brush, which I only occasionaly use to brush away dirt. My horsehair "shine brush" instantly turns my newly shined shoes into matted leather. For me, a cloth is all I really need.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tifosi View Post

^^ I find the same to be true with me. It isn't the brushing that produces the shine, it is the buffing with a cloth after. Now I brush lightly to remove loose dirt, wipe with lightly damp cloth then I buff with a cotton cloth. I get the same results as when I sit there and brush for 15 min. like a mad man.


This is also my experience. Old well used brushes are softer and produce a "buff" shine rather than just spreading the wax all over the shoe and messing the shine. I have advised friends looking to get brushes to check ebay for used ones, or even garage sales. My 10 year old Kiwi does a better job than any new $50 Saphir one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by jssdc View Post

What? Are we questioning the Mac Method here? stirpot.gif

In my relatively limited shell collection of just two pairs (and both vintage) I also tend to get the best shine with a cloth and sometimes a bit of paste wax.  However, for care after each wear I've found that brushing is more effective than wiping with a cloth for maintaining the shine.  Not sure precisely why this is but the shell surface (on the vamp at any rate) seems different after I've walked about all day than when it's been sitting in the closet.   

Mac Method is bullshit as stated numerous times... Also, as another poster said new shell will kind of "sweat" some oils, that's normal, but give what I told you a try.

Mac Method:
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Honestly, I feel that the mac method is only going to work on Alden shoes. Alden puts this kind of high shine dye job on their shell to make it their own. But I mean the "Mac" method is just really wiping your shoes, brushing them, and every now and again using wax polish. It is nothing legendary. Then again he says to wipe them down with a damp cloth. Honestly, this is where I feel it would only work with Aldens. Every bit of shell I have encountered doesn't respond well to water unless there is a very thick wax finish on it. It swells up and leaves marks and such. I think the Alden finish repels moisture to a certain extent were wiping it with a damp cloth literally is just getting dirt off. Another thing about Mac is he seemingly only wears his shoes a couple of times and then flips them on his site. I would be surprised if his alleged "wax every 15 wears" ever gets reached. Also, as noted he takes his pictures outside in natural light. This helps for the camera.

Ultimately, you can treat shell like calf. Also, Renovateur used over a wax polish in sparing amounts, swirling it around slowly has a very bulling quality. That is what I use to maintain the bulling on my shell shoes and even toe and heel counters of my calf shoes.
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