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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 545

post #8161 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Perhaps also that Saphir repair cream?

Sounds like ti might work but I have never seen it...not out here in the upper left-hand corner. I hardly see Renovateur...only one somewhat local source and it's in...ahem...California! smack.gif
post #8162 of 11291

Ok, guys. I have a question. I got these Cole Haan Major Deegan's on ebay for cheap
because they were pretty dried out and not in good shape at all. I mainly just wanted
to use them as practice for stuff since I ended up selling my other set of shoes that
I had bought with the intention of practicing on them. Now I started with Lexol leather
cleaner and this is the aftermath. I waited two hours to let them get nice and dry again
and threw some Lexol conditioner on them and they turned out pretty decent. They looked
like a work boot when I got them and I have no intention of ever getting them re-soled or
anything so I plan to run them into the ground so I'm not concerned with longevity.

 

 

I have three questions:

 

First: Is it possible to get the darkness off of that toe without using Renomat?
I'd like to be able to find something more easily accessible to use on them since
Lexol didnt do a whole lot to clean them.

 

 

Secondly, will it over-condition them if I put on Renovateur now? (Two days later)
I dont want it to become "too soft". I just want the subtle shine and conditioning
that Reno provides.

 

 

Lastly, should I use anything on the sole edge and bottom? Dubbin? They look pretty dry.

 

 

(Before the conditioner was applied)

post #8163 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


I won't take this much further but I will say this...aside from my knowledge of leather and my conviction that there probably isn't a lot of difference in the "quality" of the leather being used (finish is another thing) I just don't see any sense in making these kinds of comparisons. Why not compare the Vass against Carreducker shoes? or a St. Crispin? Or a Perry Ercolino? None of it makes sense...but falling back on big name, old name, cachet brand names is assuming a lot in my book and makes even less sense.
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
That said, it's all beside the point--it's methods, and materials that count and nothing else when you're having a discussion of the objective merits of shoemaking philosophies. It doesn't make any difference who made the shoe that has the rough suede...the only important issue is whether it's good material or if something in the process created that "problem"...such as a mistake on the part of the clicker or QC or whatever. The names don't matter, they only confuse things.

And make judgements that are based on ignorance or superficialities palatable.

Now if you want to talk about those intangible ineffable nuances that make you a devotee / disciple...well, that's another subject...in my book.

And no, I beg to differ...it's not a separate thing. It's all of a piece. The maker that economizes (cuts corners) on the heel and toe stiffs, the methods of construction, the quality and / or thickness of the insole, is the same maker that will place the clicking dies further into the margins. You just don't see those shoes--they're sold on discount or as seconds.

PS...my experience and knowledge give me an insight that is unique and perhaps useful to others if they are willing to listen and learn but it doesn't carve my words in stone. The issues (and people) that aggravate me are not just the ones that disagree with me. They are almost always the ones that ignore those insights, dismiss facts, and logic. That never speak to real objective data that is presented to them. That never offer anything substantive or objective...outside of their own limited and narrow frames of reference...to add or rebut or confirm the propositions they are espousing.

And no I'm not referring to you. I'm just saying... you don't need to defer to my experience and knowledge, you just need to acknowledge that it is a factor and be be objective enough and willing enough to learn.

--

 

 

 

Yes, let's leave this thread for the shoe care questions for now. Just want to chip in one more thing, which not only has to do with your reply: I'm also a bit tired of all these comparisons that everyone always want one to make. I always get a lot of questions on how to compare this brand to that brand, etc, which is always very hard for plenty of reasons. But at the same time I really understand why people ask for it, and do it. Comparing is very fundamental for us, we do it all the time, and when it comes to this regard it's a way for people to try to have an easy way of understanding something we don't have experience with. The easiest way to get a feeling for something else is to have it compared to something we know, and the easiest way for us to describe something for someone else is often to compare it to something they know. Doesn't mean it's always right to do that, but I understand why people do it, and ask for it.

post #8164 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWRT View Post
 

Ok, guys. I have a question. I got these Cole Haan Major Deegan's on ebay for cheap
because they were pretty dried out and not in good shape at all. I mainly just wanted
to use them as practice for stuff since I ended up selling my other set of shoes that
I had bought with the intention of practicing on them. Now I started with Lexol leather
cleaner and this is the aftermath. I waited two hours to let them get nice and dry again
and threw some Lexol conditioner on them and they turned out pretty decent. They looked
like a work boot when I got them and I have no intention of ever getting them re-soled or
anything so I plan to run them into the ground so I'm not concerned with longevity.

 

 

I have three questions:

 

First: Is it possible to get the darkness off of that toe without using Renomat?
I'd like to be able to find something more easily accessible to use on them since
Lexol didnt do a whole lot to clean them.

 

 

Secondly, will it over-condition them if I put on Renovateur now? (Two days later)
I dont want it to become "too soft". I just want the subtle shine and conditioning
that Reno provides.

 

 

Lastly, should I use anything on the sole edge and bottom? Dubbin? They look pretty dry.

 

 

(Before the conditioner was applied)

 

 

1) You can try with nail polish remover or, if you feel brave, pure acetone. French patina artist use some kind of stain detacher called Eau Ecarlate, but I don't know what it is.

2) Touch them. If they feel dry, apply a second (light) coat. If not, don't :D

3) After a couple of years of trials, I still don't know if sole oil or grease is useful or not... In my experience there is no difference, so I don't know what to say. For the edge, since usually is finished with wax-based paint, I'll be careful; the solvents in the shoe care products sometimes can strip away the finish.

post #8165 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


No, I tree my chukkas and chelseas and jodhpurs all the time.

Pull on boots...such as cowboy boots...don't have the cupped heel stiffener that a shoe has. If they did they would be hard to get into when they fit properly. The whole idea of not treeing them is to accentuate and facilitate the ability of the heel stiffener to grip the heel of the foot.

 

I see now.  Thank you!

post #8166 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickTime View Post

I see now.  Thank you!

You're welcome. fing02[1].gif
post #8167 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Could be, I suppose...although I don't see any charring.

Sometimes pits can be found in hides from parasites such as warble flies or even from improper dehairing. Unfortunately damage from parasites generally occurs on or near the backbone--prime leather in most cases.

Tanneries / curriers can fill such pits with an acrylic top coat; shoemakers can fill pits with repair crayons. Both solutions are temporary...or at least unreliable.

To fix it you could try to fill it with a similar colour of cream wax or even look for a repair crayon from woodworking sources (I've heard this works but I've never tried it myself). Once the pit is filled it will probably stay filled as the toe stiff area does not flex much if at all. Just some ideas...

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Perhaps also that Saphir repair cream?

thank you for the input.
here is 2 more pictures of the burn more clearly.

not sure where to get the repair cream. but will try the cognac saphir mdo cream or reno when i fly back home next week.

dont know if theres a better way to cover the spot



post #8168 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalzolaiFeF View Post
 

 

 

1) You can try with nail polish remover or, if you feel brave, pure acetone. French patina artist use some kind of stain detacher called Eau Ecarlate, but I don't know what it is.

2) Touch them. If they feel dry, apply a second (light) coat. If not, don't :D

3) After a couple of years of trials, I still don't know if sole oil or grease is useful or not... In my experience there is no difference, so I don't know what to say. For the edge, since usually is finished with wax-based paint, I'll be careful; the solvents in the shoe care products sometimes can strip away the finish.


1) Gave it a shot. Looks like it removed a bit of the stuff, but not enough to match
    the rest of the shoe. Was a good effort though.

 

2) I followed this and man, I'm really glad I did. I figured out how amazing Reno
    can make an old pair of shoes look.

 

3) Yeah, didnt really look like there was any original paint left. If any, it kind of
    reminded me of one of those old houses with lead paint that's peeling really bad.

 

 

Either way, after all's said and done they look 10 years newer. Thanks for the advice :)

post #8169 of 11291

You're welcome

post #8170 of 11291
Hi guys. After reading thousands of entries on this thread, I can get a pretty decent shine on my calf shoes. The thing that eludes me, however, is a really good shine on my AE cordovan Leeds. I keep hoping for something like post 2036 of this thread, on p. 136. This pair of shoes is reported to be only a couple months old.



Compare that to my Leeds. I've had these for over a year, and have brushed them for hundreds of hours. They haven't been worn a lot, but some weekends I'll brush them for several hours. I treated them with Saphir cordo creme early on (because they arrived [new] with a few minor scuffs). Since then, until this weekend, I have basically only brushed them. Today I applied a couple thin layers of Saphir Renovateur--which added a bit of shine. The shoes look like they are in great shape, but they don't have any interesting colour variation, and they aren't taking on much of a shine. All the work I've done only seems to have brought out the imperfections in the cordovan. This picture makes them look a bit shiny, but they don't have any gloss compared to a good polish on my calf shoes.



Any advice gratefully received.
post #8171 of 11291

Does anyone here use those little round daubers to put on cream or wax?  I would have thought that they put on too much of any given product.

 

While I am here, can I put in a good word for Collonil Supreme Creme de Luxee? It contains no turpentine and only 'natural' oils.It has virtually no smell.  I know it has been mentioned before but I thought  it might be useful to those who can't easily get GlenKaren products. Whether or not it is edible is anyone's guess. 

post #8172 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by P Hudson View Post

Hi guys. After reading thousands of entries on this thread, I can get a pretty decent shine on my calf shoes. The thing that eludes me, however, is a really good shine on my AE cordovan Leeds. I keep hoping for something like post 2036 of this thread, on p. 136. This pair of shoes is reported to be only a couple months old.



Compare that to my Leeds. I've had these for over a year, and have brushed them for hundreds of hours. They haven't been worn a lot, but some weekends I'll brush them for several hours. I treated them with Saphir cordo creme early on (because they arrived [new] with a few minor scuffs). Since then, until this weekend, I have basically only brushed them. Today I applied a couple thin layers of Saphir Renovateur--which added a bit of shine. The shoes look like they are in great shape, but they don't have any interesting colour variation, and they aren't taking on much of a shine. All the work I've done only seems to have brought out the imperfections in the cordovan. This picture makes them look a bit shiny, but they don't have any gloss compared to a good polish on my calf shoes.



Any advice gratefully received.

I don't know.....look pretty damned good to me! Shell is a tricky material to work with but here is my normal method:

http://riderboot.com/2012/03/24/shell-cordovan-clean-up/

In addition, I sometimes add a final wipe (very light) of Neats Foot Oil.
post #8173 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by DpprDr View Post

My boots (AS Fordhams) after a salty Chicago long weekend where they were worn and not cleaned until I returned (about 4 days worth of wear):
Untitled

After a simple cleaning with white vinegar/water and conditioner/polish: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Untitled

Untitled

Untitled

Nothing like Crat's shine but I did want to show the durability of leather.

This happens to me often, especially this year with all the snow in the northeast. I'm usually in a hotel during the week and while I don't carry a travel shoe care kit, I always take the time to wipe off the salt and clean out the welt with a damp wash cloth.
post #8174 of 11291
Quote:
Originally Posted by bcgr33n View Post


thank you for the input.
here is 2 more pictures of the burn more clearly.

not sure where to get the repair cream. but will try the cognac saphir mdo cream or reno when i fly back home next week.

dont know if theres a better way to cover the spot




Nick stocks the Repair Cream (http://www.bnelsonshoes.com/) but it seems you have to send a note......don't think he has a ordering site.

http://www.avel.com/product-details-shoe-polish-renovating-cream,40

Color #10 would seem to be the color for these and we have a couple hundred in stock. Any preferred Saphir dealer can have us ship it to you also...they know where to find me.
post #8175 of 11291
x-post from Alden thread:
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Tried at a deer bone for the first time this morning, worked pretty well for me and way more effective than using a spoon. Cleared up rolls pretty well and I only used for maybe 30 seconds on each shoe. Shoe trees are not in shoes for before and after. Deer bone was also pretty oily compared what I've read here

Before:



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