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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 542

post #8116 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I could be wrong, but I always thought that La Cordonnerie polish was just rebranded Saphir.

I am most curious about Burgol polish as allegedly it is the "best" polish, but very difficult to find. Also a lot of the materials that exist on the stuff is in German.

It is.......Avel owns LCA.

Come on man.....you know we got the goods - you just get bored easily.stirpot.gif
post #8117 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by agbassano View Post

Hairy suede?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Did you buy this directly from Vass? If so get in touch with them and I'm sure they will work this out.
post #8118 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I could be wrong, but I always thought that La Cordonnerie polish was just rebranded Saphir.

I am most curious about Burgol polish as allegedly it is the "best" polish, but very difficult to find. Also a lot of the materials that exist on the stuff is in German.

 

Burgol is a bit excessively praised. The creams are wonderful, but their wax is a bit too greasy and doesn't polishes to a mirror shine, at least not without a lot of experience.

post #8119 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstomcat View Post

Did you buy this directly from Vass? If so get in touch with them and I'm sure they will work this out.

No, from an affiliated SF vendor, I'll reach out to them. Thanks tomcat
post #8120 of 10581

Oh no!  I have found a UK supplier of Burgol products. Have I got to start buying them?  I think I have a jar of most things now. I am vowing only to buy something different once I have used up the other jars...at least, for now. 

post #8121 of 10581
Meh.
post #8122 of 10581
When you guys opened your glen jay cream polish, was it hard, almost wax-like?

Also, to pBooths precious comment, I also get the whitish residue after I walk a bit (mostly in creases and in the brogueing) when I use neutral cream. Is that normal? Or mean I use too much.
post #8123 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


It's marginal leather--cut from areas of the hide that are not prime. When manufacturers cut a hide to maximize yield, this is almost inevitable. As you get further away from the prime areas of a hide the corium contains more adipose cells and the flesh...the fiber mat...is looser. If the shoes were grainside out, that piece leather would wrinkle up and crease differently from the rest of the shoe.

Can it be fixed? No.

I've heard from many of my friend's that Vass has done chosen irregular and not prime materials to build their shoes( suede and calfskin shoes)

 

I'll no longer buy from Vass again until their quality control gets better. You NEVER EVER hear this from EG or JL

post #8124 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

When you guys opened your glen jay cream polish, was it hard, almost wax-like?

Also, to pBooths precious comment, I also get the whitish residue after I walk a bit (mostly in creases and in the brogueing) when I use neutral cream. Is that normal? Or mean I use too much.

The whitish residue is normal for most "neutral" polishes. I don't use them as I don't really see the point. The cream polishes are somewhat hard because they are coconut oil and beeswax based, which is harder at room temperature. They have very little solvents in them to keep it creamlike like other cream polishes are, but after rubbing your finger around in the jar it softens up. In my experience you don't need a hell of a lot of GlenKaren cream to cover the shoe. You shouldn't really need to "scoop" it out.
post #8125 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by namdaemun View Post

I've heard from many of my friend's that Vass has done chosen irregular and not prime materials to build their shoes( suede and calfskin shoes)

I'll no longer buy from Vass again until their quality control gets better. You NEVER EVER hear this from EG or JL

I don't know. I would imagine the only shoe manufacturer's who don't use anything less than prime are making bespoke shoes. I doubt even EG and JL are wasting all of the scraps.
Edited by patrickBOOTH - 2/19/14 at 11:05am
post #8126 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


I don't know. I would imagine the only shoe manufacturer's who don't use anything less than prime are making bespoke shoes. I doubt even EG and JL are wasting all of the scraps on RTW shoes.

 

 

When you talk about leather, the concept of scraps simply doesn't exist.

You cut the best from the center, then you use the margin to make trial shoes, to experiment new models, to fill in the bottoms, to test the dyes and finishes... Nothing gets thrown away simply because isn't the best part :D

post #8127 of 10581
That's what I am saying. Those "scraps" are indeed turning into shoes even from the best makers. Only bespoke makers are using prime for every pair of customer's shoes.
post #8128 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

That's what I am saying. Those "scraps" are indeed turning into shoes even from the best makers. Only bespoke makers are using prime for every pair of customer's shoes.

pB,

Not saying you're wrong because you're not. But there's a difference.

Manufacturers don't regard the less-than-prime leather the same way bespoke makers do. When a bespoke maker clicks a pair of shoes he not only knows that using only prime is what he has promised (and must deliver) but, as Calzo said, that even the less than prime has a use.

And foremost in the mind of the bespoke maker is the secure knowledge that since every square inch is paid for and every square inch is usable...without compromising quality...he doesn't have to throw money away, so to speak. It will get used.

But the manufacturer has already replaced all those "scraps" with other, supposedly cheaper, and easier to use materials. He's not using the "scraps" to bottom fill...it's cork, cork and more cork.. He's not making fitter's models (trial shoes). He's not using leather for the toe stiffeners or the heel stiffeners. In all likelihood, he's not even using the margins for heel pads. Most times it's faster and easier to buy pre-cut heel pads than cut them yourself.

So the only way to utilize those marginal areas and recoup some of the cost of the hide is to cut critical components out of as much of the hide as possible.

I am not saying that this is done with malice aforethought but it is a deeply rooted business philosophy and even if it is just a poor judgement call...perhaps from a worker who doesn't have enough experience to see, know and reject the suspect leather...the result it the same. A big savings for the manufacturer...with seldom any real consequences. 9 out of 10 customers will not know what they are looking at and of those that do, 9 out of 10 of them will not complain.
post #8129 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalzolaiFeF View Post

 

 

When you talk about leather, the concept of scraps simply doesn't exist.

You cut the best from the center, then you use the margin to make trial shoes, to experiment new models, to fill in the bottoms, to test the dyes and finishes... Nothing gets thrown away simply because isn't the best part " src="http://files.styleforum.net/images/smilies/biggrin.gif">

 



Makes good sense to me.

That shaggy pair of Vass suede are just horrible. I don't excuse it, nor would I accept it. I will say that in the half dozen pair of Vass shoes that I own, such poor quality leather is not evident. As such, I would be reluctant to accept, based on one pair alone, that this reflects common practice from them. I have been following the Vass thread on this forum for some time - people are not shy to complain about any aspect of the shoes that displease them.

Far from the 'nobody notices / nobody complains' paradigm - at least on this forum, the reverse seems to be true. People seem to go over their shoes with a magnifying glass searching for any fault or blemish. I have lost track of how many macro-pics of circled-in-red micro-faults I have viewed on these pages. But I have certainly never seen the likesof this shaggy shoe posted from Vass before.

I don't generally dispute the notion that $4k bespoke shoes will reflect higher quality materials and higher quality control standards than $700 ready-to-wear shoes. I don't know why one would expect otherwise. But I do reject the notion that such obvious poor quality hides as shown in this example represent the rule, rather than the significant exception in premium RTW shoes (and no, I am not suggesting that you have advanced such a proposition).

Thanks for your continued contributions to this forum.
post #8130 of 10581
Quote:
Originally Posted by namdaemun View Post

I've heard from many of my friend's that Vass has done chosen irregular and not prime materials to build their shoes( suede and calfskin shoes)

I'll no longer buy from Vass again until their quality control gets better. You NEVER EVER hear this from EG or JL

This is interesting, because I have never heard anything like this coming from Vass. Could your friends show us examples, so we know what problems with QC//bad materials they use, so we can potentially avoid it?

(Just an interesting comment, considering vass is considered one of the best deals on the market for handmade shoes, and has never been accused of shoddy workmanship or poor leather to my knowledge)
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