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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 539

post #8071 of 19038

I should clarify my comment above.  The pair I mentioned has certainly been worn in plenty of wet weather (perhaps not the norm, but also not necessarily rare).  I just meant that most of my soles will wear out in normal fashion because I wear them frequently enough such that the soles don't need replacement due to anything other than being truly worn out.  The outlier being my pair that is now 14 years old, and still on their original soles, which aren't showing signs of cracking. 

post #8072 of 19038
I guess just like regular conversations about conditioning shoes. There is that fine line between softening too much and being so rigid that it cracks. One of the secrets of the universe. revolve.gif
post #8073 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Maybe I missed that discussion but just from a practical POV, using something like Bick4 on your outsoles probably can't hurt. But anything with a heavy oil or fat base will simply soften the outsole and make it wear away quicker esp. on pavement and even in wet weather when despite the waterproofing they get saturated. Even silicone based products.

The water and the oil work the same way--loosening the fiber mat and softening the connective tissue.

 

That is the logic I've subscribed to in refraining from using anything, though I've never used Bick4.  Given what I said above, do you think I would derive any benefit from even something like Bick4 if I wear through my soles before they seem to experience any adverse effects from moisture?  In other words, will something like Bick4 impart anything desirable in my case? 

post #8074 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Those are good illustrations and reinforce what I was saying about last widths and foot length....if not being particularly on-point about the reasons.

These illustrations doesn't show that this particular pair shoe is too big or small for the feet, but rather the shoe-last is not ideal for his feet.  

post #8075 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post

These illustrations doesn't show that this particular pair shoe is too big or small for the feet, but rather the shoe-last is not ideal for his feet.  


You're right, the illustrations don't speak to reasons (as I said in my above post). But the photos provided by the OC (original questioner) clearly show that for some reason...almost certainly one of the two I outlined...his medial ball joint is not synchronizing with the corresponding position on the last or the insole (which is cut to the last).

If the heel to ball measurement on the last doesn't correspond to the heel to ball measurement on the foot the last is "not ideal for the foot"...and never will be. That's an absolute no matter what foot or what shoe.

If the tread width does not correspond to the weight bearing footprint in the joint area, the last is "not ideal for the foot"...another absolute. (Although too narrow a tread width will not create that particular problem if the girth is correct).

There's simply not many other reasons, if any, that those creases would develop.

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Edited by DWFII - 2/13/14 at 8:38am
post #8076 of 19038

I've taken extraordinarily good care of my AE Strands but I'm considering whether its worth the money to invest $150 to have them recrafted given what appears to be paper thin leather on either side of the upper part of the vamp. I've always used Saphir products and this morning I applied renomat to strip all waxes, then applied renovateur to the area pictured in the photo with no other creme or wax applied - just renovateur. This is not creasing as much as it is "crinkling" - again almost like paper.  

 

Is this due to inferior leather or is this the result of normal wear and tear that would show up in any shoe. Wondering whether it would be wise to ebay these for $80 and then put the $230 toward a pair of Carmina's or Edward Green (having graduated to those higher quality shoes of which I now have a sample of each, as well as a couple of pair of Lobbs).  On the plus side I do love the design of the AE Strand.  What say you? Opinions? Is this an improper care issue, or the quality of leather, or "normal"?  Of course it probably shouldn't bother me but have shoe OCD, it does.

 

post #8077 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwhinson View Post
 

I've taken extraordinarily good care of my AE Strands but I'm considering whether its worth the money to invest $150 to have them recrafted given what appears to be paper thin leather on either side of the upper part of the vamp. I've always used Saphir products and this morning I applied renomat to strip all waxes, then applied renovateur to the area pictured in the photo with no other creme or wax applied - just renovateur. This is not creasing as much as it is "crinkling" - again almost like paper.  

 

Is this due to inferior leather or is this the result of normal wear and tear that would show up in any shoe. Wondering whether it would be wise to ebay these for $80 and then put the $230 toward a pair of Carmina's or Edward Green (having graduated to those higher quality shoes of which I now have a sample of each, as well as a couple of pair of Lobbs).  On the plus side I do love the design of the AE Strand.  What say you? Opinions? Is this an improper care issue, or the quality of leather, or "normal"?  Of course it probably shouldn't bother me but have shoe OCD, it does.

 

One more thought - I wonder if I had used renomat to strip them on a regular basis and reapply renovateur, would this condition still have developed (or is it the result of too much wax buildup for too long?)  Again the photo again has NO wax or creme applied, only renovateur, and then brushed.

post #8078 of 19038
Leather behavior is weird. Hard to say about the cause and quality, but in handling many different brands of mid level and high end shoes I would put AE's at the bottom of my list. I would get some new ones if it bothers you that much, but I don't see this as being a problem. They won't explode or anything.

Question, why did you strip all of the waxes off with renomat? I can't really understand one doing this unless they are preparing their shoes to be recolored or something.
post #8079 of 19038

I stripped the shoes because I thought what I might be seeing is a surface of cracking wax.  Also - to clarify - I would not be having them recrafted due to the uppers, rather the simply need new soles and heels.  

post #8080 of 19038
I'd vote new shoes, but that vote is based on more than just that wrinkled section. I dislike AE's for a lot of reasons.
post #8081 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwhinson View Post

Is this due to inferior leather or is this the result of normal wear and tear that would show up in any shoe.
It's not necessarily thin leather (doesn't look particularly thin in the photo either). What it is, is leather from the margins--it's not prime, IOW. It comes from the shoulder or belly (or close at hand) where the fiber mat is looser and less dense.
post #8082 of 19038

I agree with DWF, the facings are usually saved from the extreme parts of the calf, at leat in the industrial production.

post #8083 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalzolaiFeF View Post
 

I agree with DWF, the facings are usually saved from the extreme parts of the calf, at leat in the industrial production.

That clarifies things.  Thanks.

post #8084 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbya View Post


I would actually encourage against applying any waxed shoe polish to Chromexcel. Chromexcel is an oiled leather that is unwaxed. Using Saphir Renovateur or any other polish that contains a wax will change the look of the shoe.

We just picked up (literally I just finished adding the product today) a product that Saphir has just for oiled leathers (including Chromexcel). It is oil-based and does not contain any waxes. Available in neutral, brown, or black. What's nice about the pigmented varieties is that it is a very, very light pigment, so it will not alter the natural look of the finish (also not essential that it's a "perfect" match).

http://www.hangerproject.com/saphir-greasy-leather-cream.html

 

There wasn't much follow up on this at the time, nor can I find reference to people using Saphir Greasy Leather Cream elsewhere on SF. Does anyone have any experience with it and opinions on its use?

 

There seem to be many schools of thought with CXL, ranging from not conditioning (due to it being packed with oils) to VSC (Horween recommends) to this Saphir Greasy (Kirby recommends) to Obenauf's Heavy Duty LP (Crane's recommends, more for hard wear) to coconut oil, Blackrock Leather n Rich, Bicks 4, Lexol, and more.

 

I know you really can't go too wrong, it'll be fine any way you go, etc. etc. Consider this a point of curiosity :)

post #8085 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by CalzolaiFeF View Post

I agree with DWF, the facings are usually saved from the extreme parts of the calf, at leat in the industrial production.


Yes...my mistake...as you suggest, most bespoke makers would never cut any major component of the shoe from leather that was not prime.

Manufacturers are constrained by profit concerns, however, and often cut for maximum yield.

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Edited by DWFII - 2/13/14 at 5:58pm
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