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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 494

post #7396 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by kentyman View Post
 

 

Double-exclamations aside, I'm just pointing out that you can't claim to know the ingredients of any and all cordovan creams on the market, and therefore cannot say with any certainty that they're all safe for calfskin.

 

I think with how inexpensive shoe polish designed for calfskin is, we should be suggesting he use the right tool for the job rather than risk any damage.

 

cordovan cremes by their definition have to be more gentle than cremes for calf skin!! less solvents  -more oils so not to damage the smooth surface of cordovan( thats why when you use cremes for calfskin on cordovan you make it dull, you take out some of the wax infused in cordovan at  tanning-making progress)

Quote:
Originally Posted by New Shoes1 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

cordovan cremes is the same cremes as the cremes for calf  and conteining les solvents and more oils and pigments!! believe i really know what i say!!

 



This seems like an oversimplification. Saphir cordovan creme has a neatsfoot oil base while my understanding is that the shoe polish has a shea butter (or something similar) as its base. Similarly, the cordovan creme has no turpentine wjhile the polish has turpentine to assist in penetrating into the calfskin.

turpentine is a solvent(like naptha etc) !! its perpose in wax-creme polish is to prevent solidification of the product so you can use it!! turpentine's work has nothing to do with penetration!!! btw waxes of any kind of polish stay on top of the leather they dont penetrate in it!! there are other ingedients thats penetrating in(like oils etc) so to make leather supple and prevent drying

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Kentyman, sorry to say, but the renovateur is probably contributing to the dryness that you see there. There is a lot of turpentine in that stuff, and it should only be used sparingly.

i really like Glenjays polish too and consider some guys here like you as friends of mine(hope one day we can all meet in persone) but pls dont right things that dont stund!! we have discused it here a lot with glenjay -chogal and you (if i remember correctly)!! 

RENOVATEUR has no turpentine in it, it is water based( no smell of turpentine and nowhere is mentioned that it has in it)!

 

the cracking i have seen it too on my shoes and it has nothing to do with the conditioning properties of the product!! this micro cracks are from the bees wax that is in renovateur that stays on top of the leather and rase a shine if you buff!!wax is what is cracking and because there is no pigment(color) is visible!! the same efect but more visible is if you use neutral wax on dark brown shoes!!:happy:

post #7397 of 10809
Crat, as I am a shoe shining newbie, could you explain the how you fixed the high heel damage?
post #7398 of 10809

Benhour,

I think that  Renovateur does contain turpentine. It certainly smells as though it does. Are you thinking of the Collonil cream? You recommended this to me and it has no turpentine and no smell. 


Edited by Munky - 12/5/13 at 7:39am
post #7399 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogerP View Post

Crat, you are a freakin' genius. icon_gu_b_slayer%5B1%5D.gif

+1

Isn't Crat from the UK? If so, that would explain it. Wind blown storms pass from the USA across Ireland - where water droplets become infused with a magical Irish property - before raining upon mainland UK. This is especially true around Christmas time. Only this water + wax will produce the finish you see. It might sound unbelievable, but I have documents, data, and an eminent scientist ready to back it all up. If you want to match Crat's mirror shine, you'll simply have to move country.

I hope that helps someone.

Lear
post #7400 of 10809
Benhour, Reno does contain turpentine, Collonil does not.

DW, when you use water to last shoes, or as you stated above smooth out some wrinkles and such do you use water straight from the tap, or do you use distilled water? My understanding is that water itself isn't horrible for leather as much as the contents in the water contributing to the perception that water is harmful to leather. Just curious really on the use of tap vs. distilled in the shoemaking process.
post #7401 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Benhour, Reno does contain turpentine, Collonil does not.

DW, when you use water to last shoes, or as you stated above smooth out some wrinkles and such do you use water straight from the tap, or do you use distilled water? My understanding is that water itself isn't horrible for leather as much as the contents in the water contributing to the perception that water is harmful to leather. Just curious really on the use of tap vs. distilled in the shoemaking process.

PB,

There could be something to the idea that hard water...with minerals in it...would have an effect. That said, I have not ever paid much attention to the idea. None of my teachers/mentors did,none of their teachers did...time out of mind. I suspect it's somewhat beside-the-point. I do put a drop of liquid dish soap in to break through the oils and waxes on the surface of the leather.

The Bick4 is a great lubricant for the bone. And a conditioning agent that will slow down the evaporation and movement of the water.

All that said, when you use water to last (or chase wrinkles), you need to either be all in or dern careful esp. with light coloured leathers. Otherwise you risk water stains--which come not from the water but from residual tanning agents and dyestuff. When I last boots they're fully soaked. When I last shoes I just spritz the flesh side of the vamps.

BTW, I don't know how Crat approached it, but boning out the scratches and smoothing the leather, as I described above, is a good first step when you have damage.
post #7402 of 10809
Ok, here is where I admit my further ignorance… I hear flesh side and grain side all of the time, but I have no idea what the difference is as it is all flesh, no? confused.gif
post #7403 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Ok, here is where I admit my further ignorance… I hear flesh side and grain side all of the time, but I have no idea what the difference is as it is all flesh, no? confused.gif


My understanding is that flesh side is the side that faces inward, towards to "meat," if you will. Grain side is the side that faces out, what we would see on the animal.

post #7404 of 10809
It should be called "muscle side" or "bone side". I think I will start this tread just to irritate DW and his shoe historian friend. wink.gif
post #7405 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

It should be called "muscle side" or "bone side". I think I will start this tread just to irritate DW and his shoe historian friend. wink.gif

NakedSnake has it right.

And if you want to call it "bone side"...I'll know what you're talking about.

Don't worry about irritating me...the fact that you asked for more information...that alone...gives you anti-irritation points, big time. It speaks of genuine-ness.
post #7406 of 10809
smile.gif
post #7407 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post
 

the cracking i have seen it too on my shoes and it has nothing to do with the conditioning properties of the product!! this micro cracks are from the bees wax that is in renovateur that stays on top of the leather and rase a shine if you buff!!wax is what is cracking and because there is no pigment(color) is visible!! the same efect but more visible is if you use neutral wax on dark brown shoes!!:happy:

 

Trust me, the cracking on my Elgins is not from wax and does not come out from buffing.

 

I hope to put AE Leather Lotion on them tonight to see if that helps. I already feel bad for leaving them wanting for this long.

post #7408 of 10809
Doesn't Elgin make watches? If you are wearing them on your feet that must be why they are cracking. confused.gif
post #7409 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd13jd13 View Post

Crat, as I am a shoe shining newbie, could you explain the how you fixed the high heel damage?

I just polished over it tbh, method in sig.
post #7410 of 10809
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Benhour,

I think that  Renovateur does contain turpentine. It certainly smells as though it does. Are you thinking of the Collonil cream? You recommended this to me and it has no turpentine and no smell.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Benhour, Reno does contain turpentine, Collonil does not.
 

it's like seeing myself quoted to me as an answer to me!!! hahaha

 

Munky yes Collonil cream has no turpentine in it as i have said you in the past!!(officially from Collonil ,as the official reseller importer here is a friend of mine)!!

 

Renovateur has no smell of turpentine at all(you can take turpentine from an artist shop  and smell it)  and if you see the official shite instead of all the other products where is mentioned that it has turpentine as a natural solvent at Renovateur there is no such state

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