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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 479

post #7171 of 12472
Quote:
Originally Posted by basiameda View Post
 

 

Ironically, I have a question concerning a #8 Tassel Loafer I picked up from eBay. These loafers crease and fold in a similar way on both shoes but my right foot is borderline D/E and accentuates the pattern from the previous owner resulting in bowing.

 

 

Can a cobbler do anything to fix this? If i send them in for Alden Restoration, will this fold pattern go away when the shoes are relasted?

 

sadly, I'd cut your losses. loafers are the hardest, imo, to get fitted off the fly. even moreso when preworn.

 

I'd spend some time in a local (hopefully) to you store of a retailer that offers the manuf you are interested in. get fitted professionally, buy a pair there to support them for their help, and then you'll have a better idea of what to look for in the future.. 


Edited by kwhitelaw - 11/1/13 at 12:09am
post #7172 of 12472
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

If it's not a rude question, why do people buy beaten up old shoes on e-bay?  Surely shoes wear in around a particular person's foot?  Wouldn't it be better to wait until you have the money for a new pair?

Great question. Every pair of shoes I ever bought online (wasn't many) went right back. You never know what you are going to get… how the owner took care of them and such. I have a friend who has spent a small fortune trying to find deals on ebay. Honestly, not worth my time or effort. In the end you probably spend the same amount buying duds.
post #7173 of 12472
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Great question. Every pair of shoes I ever bought online (wasn't many) went right back. You never know what you are going to get… how the owner took care of them and such. I have a friend who has spent a small fortune trying to find deals on ebay. Honestly, not worth my time or effort. In the end you probably spend the same amount buying duds.

+1 same experience. 

post #7174 of 12472

Do any of you guys have experience with drill bit polishing systems?  

 

Something along these lines:

 

post #7175 of 12472
Yes, I bought one out of curiosity because it was cheap. I threw it in the garbage after about 10 minutes. That is all you need to know.
post #7176 of 12472
If it seems to be the answer to life and costs only $9.99 the chances are you are being taken for ride
post #7177 of 12472

That brand? That one in particular looks cheap/as seen on tv quality, but I would like to think the concept is worthwhile.  

post #7178 of 12472
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post


Great question. Every pair of shoes I ever bought online (wasn't many) went right back. You never know what you are going to get… how the owner took care of them and such. I have a friend who has spent a small fortune trying to find deals on ebay. Honestly, not worth my time or effort. In the end you probably spend the same amount buying duds.

 

There are certainly gems on eBay for shoppers armed with knowledge.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleroller View Post
 

Do any of you guys have experience with drill bit polishing systems?  

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Something along these lines:

 

 

Hand polishing is faster on finished leathers.

post #7179 of 12472
I have a question about removing old polish with Renomat. I just got a pair of ebayed Loake chukkas in English tan. The toes have had dark brown wax applied to them. So I did what the Renomat pictoral instructions said and brushed, applied Renomat, left for 15 minutes. At the end of 15 minutes -- no difference, literally!

I then did another round of Renomat, with the extra step of taking a small applicator brush to the toes after the Renomat had settled in for a few minutes. The old wax seemed to spread out a little bit, but it wasn't removed.

Do I have to get some acetone/white spirit/other alcohol for this? Shouldn't Renomat be taking care of this easily? The old wax actually doesn't look like a huge amount, it's just that it's noticeable because it's a different colour. Am I using the Renomat wrongly?

On a sidenote, I have had very good results with Saphir's suede cleaner with multiple pairs of shoes, and I just did what the instructions said.
post #7180 of 12472
Are those shoes burnished at factory??

If not, try Naptha or Spirit of turpentine.
post #7181 of 12472
Quote:
Originally Posted by joonian View Post

I have a question about removing old polish with Renomat. I just got a pair of ebayed Loake chukkas in English tan. The toes have had dark brown wax applied to them. So I did what the Renomat pictoral instructions said and brushed, applied Renomat, left for 15 minutes. At the end of 15 minutes -- no difference, literally!

I then did another round of Renomat, with the extra step of taking a small applicator brush to the toes after the Renomat had settled in for a few minutes. The old wax seemed to spread out a little bit, but it wasn't removed.

Do I have to get some acetone/white spirit/other alcohol for this? Shouldn't Renomat be taking care of this easily? The old wax actually doesn't look like a huge amount, it's just that it's noticeable because it's a different colour. Am I using the Renomat wrongly?

On a sidenote, I have had very good results with Saphir's suede cleaner with multiple pairs of shoes, and I just did what the instructions said.

RenoMat is a heavy cleaner/light stripper.....not a heavy duty stripper. As a product, it sits in a category between the two. Without knowing the history of the shoe, and what someone might have applied to it themselves, hard to say what product/process to use, but if they are new and the color on the toe came from the factory, it would most likely be a spray finish - not a cream finish (not much antiquing is done with wax....not enough pigment). RenoMat will have little to no effect on spray finishes, unfortunately.
post #7182 of 12472
Thanks for the responses. This does not look like it was applied at the factory. It's far too uneven. It does look like someone applied a few coats of dark brown paste wax to it -- I've done the same with tan coloured shoes in the past and this is just what they looked like.

After the renomat dried, I put a coat of renovateur on it. Now the shoe is completely dry, I can see that a bit of the tan dye has come off in places near the toe. But the brown paste wax remains. Strange isnt it? I think I might go down the white spirit route and see what happens.
post #7183 of 12472

Frequently, people ask for guidance about how to look after their shoes. Usually, they are referred back to previous entries on this site. I would suggest that not many people have the time or inclination to  read through nearly 500 pages. Might it be useful for people on here to occasionally post a description of basic shoe care? My list of items required would be as follows:

 

1. An old tee shirt

2. A jar of shoe cream

3. A tin of wax polish

4. An optional brush. 

 

Hopefully, their use is obvious. (If not, wear the tee shirt, use the cream for shaving, polish your floor with the wax and brush your coat).

post #7184 of 12472
Quote:
Originally Posted by jungleroller View Post
 

Do any of you guys have experience with drill bit polishing systems?  

 

Something along these lines:

 

 

The product you posted advertises "wool".  Other types of machines I have seen and used at times is 100% Fine Lambs Wool.

 

Here are some examples:

 

"Beck Shoe Polishers are the highest quality shoe polisher made in the USA.  Beck has been selling and supporting its customers for over 60 years and we are the only United States manufacturer of shoe polishers.

 

"Our durable die-case zinc alloy motor housing is built to last for generations.  We still sell buffer pads to our loyal customers that purchased our polisher over 40 years ago.  

 

"Our buffer pads are made of the finest lamb's wool generating the perfect shine every time."

 

Beck Diplomat Shoe Polisher Link

post #7185 of 12472
Hi everyone,
I have a question regarding the condition of a pair of shoes I have, and I was recommended to post question here:

So I have a pair of Guidi 992 in Kangaroo, and the leather is smooth on all except this left panel on the left shoe, which almost looks like cracks. Is this a flaw on their side, or something happens regularly? The only other pair I have is one-piece 995's and they don't have this problem. Can this issue be corrected at my end?
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)




other side:

Thank in advance smile.gif
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