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post #7141 of 12370
Best case: let time do it's own burnishing.
post #7142 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Are there any places that do burnishing, or is it better to pretty much do it by hand? (Just didn't want to mess up my shoes
)

You are in the right city to be locating a source.

 

Patrick Thompson, buyer of men's fashions for Planet Blue, would be an excellent resource in Los Angeles to ask.

 

1)  Patrick's interview is in the following link:

 

www.ehow.com/feature_12154648_mens-shoes-burnished-leather.html

 

2)  You can probably get through to him by contacting one of the stores in the following directory link:

 

http://shopplanetblue.com/store-locator/

 

All my best,

 

David

post #7143 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

Are there any places that do burnishing, or is it better to pretty much do it by hand? (Just didn't want to mess up my shoes)

 

ron rider used to do burnishing/antiquing for people...

post #7144 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

ron rider used to do burnishing/antiquing for people...

Yeah, but his antiquing thread/his presence on here pretty much died, so I didn't know if he still did it//best way to contact
post #7145 of 12370

Disclaimer: I have no idea how to shine shoes or what constitutes a high quality finished look, post-shine.

 
What is the general consensus around here on getting your shoes shined by professionals rather than by yourself? From those dudes in Nordstroms, to guys on street corners downtown? Rainy season is just around the corner - are these guys good enough to confidently protect my shoes from normal rainy weather?
 
I found on yelp a guy running his own shoe shine business on a street corner near my office with universal praise and acclaim in his reviews. He apparently uses Lincoln products and sells a 25 shine card for $50. I imagine style forumers generally encourage learning to shine and protect your shoes yourself. But for someone like me who rarely has any free time, I want to just start supporting the local shoe shine guy, if that sort of thing is approved of around here.
post #7146 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Hello MoneyWellSpent,

You are not completely right in your account of Dr Marten's shoes. The boots version became popular, soon after they were first made, in the 1960s, in the UK. They were the favoured boots for Skinheads at the time. They went a bit quite for a couple of decades and began to be popular, again, in the 1990s.

 

Also, the goodyear welted, shoes aren't limited to their most expensive items. You can pay over £300 for a pair of DM's but I have three pairs, at around £100 a pair that are all described as goodyear welted.

 

It is interesting that you suggest that there is little or nothing in the making of DM's hat resembles what is usually expected of goodyear welting. Aren't there patents covering this sort of thing and couldn't Dr Marten's be sued for use of a name, and/or for false advertising?

 

Thanks, again, for your very helpful information.

 

My comment about the fashion side of DM's wasn't intended to be comprehensive.  I was just speaking from personal experience with remembering them being so popular in the 1990's.  I personally never cared for them, though one of my siblings had a pair back then.  Also, I'm in the US, so their UK fashion trends wouldn't have been evident to me.

 

Regarding the price, I haven't scrolled through all of their options, but it still appears to me that their more expensive offerings are constructed with either "Goodyear-welting" or "Leather-welting."  I don't know what they consider the difference to be between "Goodyear-welting" and "Leather-welting."  They don't clearly explain that, but I will say that their "Leather-welted" shoes resemble traditional Goodyear-welted shoes outwardly more than the ones that they actually call "Goodyear-welted."  At the end of the day, I'm just calling them like I see them.  They describe their manufacturing technique and they have some videos on their website.  They are clearly using methods and techniques that aren't "traditional."  I won't say that nothing in the making of DM's resembles what is usually expected of Goodyear-welting.  However, I would go so far as saying that it looks different enough to me that I wouldn't consider it to be the same manufacturing process overall.

 

I'm not a lawyer or an expert in patents, but I would assume that the machines themselves are what the patents cover (if they are still covered).  "Goodyear-welting" is a process of manufacturing welted shoes using machines.  In other words there isn't just one "Goodyear-welting machine."  It takes many machines, each with their own specialty.  You can patent a process as well, of course, and it may have been originally patented.  Also, patents expire, no?  If they were patented ~150 years ago, are the patents still in existence?  Also, are these international in their scope?  They were patented in the United States, so does that mean that a company in England can't do something "similar" and use the same famous name?  Again, before the patent experts come out of the woodwork, I'm not an expert in that arena.  I could take the time to do some reading on it and come to a conclusion fairly easily, but frankly I probably won't at this point.  Someone else can probably chime in pretty quickly.      

 

Yes, the prices vary widely, but those prices are impacted by many factors, not just their construction technique as I had originally stated.  When I go to their website, and sort shoes by price from highest to lowest, it appears to me that the non-welted versions of their shoes are consistently less expensive than their welted ones. 

post #7147 of 12370

Hello MoneyWellSpent,

Thank you very much for your helpful comments. I didn't intend to be hugely critical of what you had written! I found it to be instructive, as I have the other comments you make in your last message. So thank you for those. Best wishes, Munky.

post #7148 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Hello MoneyWellSpent,

Thank you very much for your helpful comments. I didn't intend to be hugely critical of what you had written! I found it to be instructive, as I have the other comments you make in your last message. So thank you for those. Best wishes, Munky.

 

No offense taken, just trying to make sure I was understood!

post #7149 of 12370

Morning gents,

 

Have a quick question... 

 

Was in a rush this morning and ended up scuffing my shoes on the concrete step in the garage. My foot was parallel to the step and it got scratched up as I was reaching for the light. I attached some pictures of the damage...hoping that it's not a big deal and can be easily fixed via normal polishing.

 

What do you guys think? Is this just a normal job to clean & polish or will it require some more? Also, what am I to do with the heel portion? I never polished the heel or anything like that before.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

post #7150 of 12370
Cream and polish will hide the scratch damages.
post #7151 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karembeu View Post
 

Morning gents,

 

Have a quick question...

 

Was in a rush this morning and ended up scuffing my shoes on the concrete step in the garage. My foot was parallel to the step and it got scratched up as I was reaching for the light. I attached some pictures of the damage...hoping that it's not a big deal and can be easily fixed via normal polishing.

 

What do you guys think? Is this just a normal job to clean & polish or will it require some more? Also, what am I to do with the heel portion? I never polished the heel or anything like that before.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

judging by the pics the  scratches are on surface so there would be no problem,and as chogal said  cream polish will do the trick!! as for the heel if it is made from wood or leather do the same thing but at the end add some wax too to give it more shine!

post #7152 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by ManImCool View Post
 

Disclaimer: I have no idea how to shine shoes or what constitutes a high quality finished look, post-shine.

 
What is the general consensus around here on getting your shoes shined by professionals rather than by yourself? From those dudes in Nordstroms, to guys on street corners downtown? Rainy season is just around the corner - are these guys good enough to confidently protect my shoes from normal rainy weather?
 
I found on yelp a guy running his own shoe shine business on a street corner near my office with universal praise and acclaim in his reviews. He apparently uses Lincoln products and sells a 25 shine card for $50. I imagine style forumers generally encourage learning to shine and protect your shoes yourself. But for someone like me who rarely has any free time, I want to just start supporting the local shoe shine guy, if that sort of thing is approved of around here.

 

If you are near a Nordstroms, the $2.50 shine hits the spot - they use very good products.  Last time I was there I tipped the guy to go into detail what products he used throughout the shine.  That would be one path.

 

Another would be to try the local guy with the Lincoln.  It's pretty hard to mess up "black".  If you have other colors and different types of leather, then you may venture out or buy the products yourself - or a combination of both.

 

Are you in Manhattan?  Or a large city?  I could post some great referrals that have been time tested.

 

For the do-itself, go to the following two links and digest the methods AND the products:

 

LINK 1

 

LINK 2

 

All my best,

 

David

post #7153 of 12370

Thank you chogall & benhour!

 

Makes me feel at ease knowing that the damage shouldn't be too hard to cover. Will definitely work this this weekend.

post #7154 of 12370

you can use cream polish on the heel stack as well if you don't have any sole edge dressing. 

 

and for better result, cream, high grit count sandpaper, and cream polish again. 

post #7155 of 12370
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post
 

 

If you are near a Nordstroms, the $2.50 shine hits the spot - they use very good products.  Last time I was there I tipped the guy to go into detail what products he used throughout the shine.  That would be one path.

 

Another would be to try the local guy with the Lincoln.  It's pretty hard to mess up "black".  If you have other colors and different types of leather, then you may venture out or buy the products yourself - or a combination of both.

 

Are you in Manhattan?  Or a large city?  I could post some great referrals that have been time tested.

 

For the do-itself, go to the following two links and digest the methods AND the products:

 

LINK 1

 

LINK 2

 

All my best,

 

David

 

David, thank you for your input. Extremely appreciated. Thanks for the links as well. I work in the financial district of San Francisco.

 
 
At the moment, my only colors of shoes are black, burgundy, and burnished brown. Much like shaving with a double-edged safety razor, I'm sure I'll eventually teach myself to shine my shoes and it will be very rewarding, but right now I am clearly a novice, nor have the time. Especially since it seems like I need separate brushes/cloths for each shade. Will the average Nordstrom/street corner guy have multiple shades of brown polishes/creams/brushes/cloths to work with, rather than just use one type of brown for all shades of brown?
 
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