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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 475

post #7111 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Willin View Post


Could someone advise if I am doing the waxing process in the correct order? Thanks.

the only thing i can recomend to you is to see the process me, glenjay and some other gents here have posted and see if this works for you!! about the melting , i have said once that i melt the wax polish but only because thats make the solvents evaporate and then its easier to build layers  cause the less solvents wont effect the previous layers!!! about 3-5 applies and you ll have to be ok to raise a mirror shine!

post #7112 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

the only thing i can recomend to you is to see the process me, glenjay and some other gents here have posted and see if this works for you!! about the melting , i have said once that i melt the wax polish but only because thats make the solvents evaporate and then its easier to build layers  cause the less solvents wont effect the previous layers!!! about 3-5 applies and you ll have to be ok to raise a mirror shine!

Do you have a page number or link to direct me to posts you reference? Thanks.
post #7113 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

Huh, I've never seen shell get that shiny before. Good stuff.

Wax...
Quote:
Originally Posted by dieworkwear View Post

I don't understand the dab of water advice.

The point of adding water to wax, as I understand it, is to soften the material up a bit, so you can more easily fill up the pores in calf (which is grained). Shell is not grained. The only point of adding wax polish to shell (and you should only add very little) is to give it a minimal amount of protection. Adding water just means you have a bit more of a watery wax, as there's no grain to fill here.

It's been a mystery to me why shell develops those bumps that it does when it gets wet. Ron Rider said on his blog that it's from moisture getting trapped under layers of wax, which from what I remember, is why he said you shouldn't wax your shell too heavily. My shell gets bumps regardless of how much wax is on it, and regardless of how old it is, but who knows. I do know that my shell shoes look dull after they get wet though, and the only thing that will bring out the shine again is buffing.

If you want to shine up your shoes, just keep buffing. But adding all these products in the way you've been adding (or how it sounds like you've been adding) is probably not wise. FWIW, I doubt you've really damaged the material, given how dense it is, so you can probably "repair" the material easily.

Water is to help the solvents in wax polish evaporate and cools down from all the rubbing. Alcohol does the same thing.
post #7114 of 10118

Hey guys, I've been reading through the thread and have used the search function, but I just wanted to clarify in terms of products I'm using,

 

I have brown, black, and walnut shoes, and currently I have

 

1. Saphir Renovateur

2. Saphir Creme 1925 Dark Brown

3. Saphir Creme 1925 Black

4. Saphir Pate de Luxe wax polish Dark Brown

5. Saphir Pate de Luxe wax polish Black

6. AE Heel and Sole Edge Dressing in Black, Brown, and Natural (for Walnut)

7. AE Premium Shoe Polish Walnut

 

My question is if I understand correctly the AE Premium Shoe Polish (in the tube) is basically a combination of the Saphir Creme and the polish, so can I still do a mirror shine on them after using the AE Shoe Polish? What color wax should I use? Neutral?

 

Am I missing anything else? Got 3 horsehair brushes and 3 daubers.

post #7115 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Odd I/O View Post

Ron, for the Nano Protector how often should it be re-applied? My retailer recommended after every couple of wears which seems a little excessive to me. I've been using it on a pair of suede chukkas.

Does anyone else know?
post #7116 of 10118

I've heard every couple of months to half a year. Depends how often you wear them and the conditions, really.

post #7117 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Wax...
Water is to help the solvents in wax polish evaporate and cools down from all the rubbing. Alcohol does the same thing.

Not exactly:

Water actually impleads the evaporation of the solvent to some degree, alcohol less so.

There are two main things that define evaporation: vapor pressure (which is measured in millimeters of mercury [mmHg]), and oxygen/hydrogen bonding.

The lower the mmHg the faster something evaporates, and the greater the oxygen/hydrogen bonding the slower it evaporates.

The vapor pressure is as follows

Naphtha = .082 mmHg (typical solvent in shoe polish)
Orange Oil = 1.43 mmHg (solvent in GlenKaren shoe polish))
Turpentine = 4 mmHg (typical solvent in Saphir polish)
Water = 17.5 mmHg
Isopropyl Alcohol = 33 mmHg

Based on vapor pressure alone it would seem that water evaporates faster what alcohol, but because water has such high oxygen/hydrogen bonding it evaporates about twice as slowly as alcohol.

The main purpose of water in shining a shoe is as a relatively smooth barrier/surface (at the molecular level) to press against the wax to smooth it out. If the wax is too soft (like cream polish) the water will penetrate the wax and actually break it down a little. The harder the wax the smoother the water can make it. This is why carnauba wax is best for spit shining.

Actually if you ever want to get rid of excess cream polish on a shoe, just spritz the shoe with a little water and take a shoe brush to it while it is damp (wear an apron and do it outside).

In regard to using alcohol when spit shining: The barrier/surface is very similar, but since it evaporates quicker you don’t have to rub as long, and the heat transfer qualities of a faster evaporation (that chogall referred to) will cool the surface coat a little quicker.

I still prefer to use water to polish my shoes, and drink my alcohol while doing it (preferably not Isopropyl Alcohol. [more like Glencairn scotch]).
post #7118 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeneralW View Post
 

Hey guys, I've been reading through the thread and have used the search function, but I just wanted to clarify in terms of products I'm using,

 

I have brown, black, and walnut shoes, and currently I have

 

1. Saphir Renovateur

2. Saphir Creme 1925 Dark Brown

3. Saphir Creme 1925 Black

4. Saphir Pate de Luxe wax polish Dark Brown

5. Saphir Pate de Luxe wax polish Black

6. AE Heel and Sole Edge Dressing in Black, Brown, and Natural (for Walnut)

7. AE Premium Shoe Polish Walnut

 

My question is if I understand correctly the AE Premium Shoe Polish (in the tube) is basically a combination of the Saphir Creme and the polish, so can I still do a mirror shine on them after using the AE Shoe Polish? What color wax should I use? Neutral?

 

Am I missing anything else? Got 3 horsehair brushes and 3 daubers.

 

Just to make sure you are aware, AE Premium Shoe Polish is not made by Saphir.  I think it may be made by Collonil, however. 

 

Yes, you can achieve a mirror shine after you have nourished your shoes with traditional cream polish by adding paste wax.  The color of wax is largely personal preference, and depends on the look you are going for.

post #7119 of 10118
Regarding Renomat: firstly, we started using the phrase Reno to mean Renovateur. Now we're using Reno to sometimes mean Renomat. Novices beware. Would hate for someone to confuse the two smile.gif

Just a quick thought: I used Renomat a while back. Great stuff on everything from JL's to RMW's. However, I did notice that on a particular pair, the leather just above the welt (toe only) absorbed rainwater & puddle splashes very quickly. At first I thought it might be entering through the Renomat stripped leather sole edge. Now I'm wondering if it's the actual welt join itself. Should this have been obvious to me? Was unsure after reading how a stripped sole edge can act like a sponge. Anyway, I've just had the edges professionally coated - you need heat/friction to apply the very hard wax they use - as I can't do this at home. Dye by itself does nothing to protect, but the new Saphir edge dressing (in the tube) might. I realize I could've used plain old Saphir wax, but I'm after something a little more permanent.

Anyway, the point of this ramble is to see whether it's the sole edge or welt join. As it NEVER happened before the application of Renomat. It has to be one or the other.

I'm finding it hard to discuss things that aren't already covered in this thread. If you're a novice and really serious about proper shoe care & polishing , you should read the entire thread over a few weeks smile.gif Pretty much everything contained within should keep you going.

Lear (Way of the Mirror)
post #7120 of 10118
I would say that the renomat could be part of the issue you are having. I think it would be wise to maybe put some snoseal, or obaneufs in the joint between the welt and upper lightly to ensure no water penetration occurs.

Way of the mirror, Lear. Way of the mirror.
post #7121 of 10118
Yes, I know it's the Renomat that's causing the problem. Probably is coming through the welt join. Without proper treatment there'll be a permanent tide mark around the toe-box (light coloured shoes). I'll give your tip a go, after another soaking. I'm curious, and want to able to strike the water soaking through the solid sole edge off the list of possible causes. Might save me hassle & tears on other pairs.

I've been away for a while. Glad to see you're still here icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

Lear
post #7122 of 10118
If shoe cream seems to have absorbed unevenly on your shoe (left it for about 5 min before I brushed), now the shoe color looks cloudy, what should I do? (Don't want to wax the entire shoe, and don't want to renomat, too drastic). I've tried using cream over it to even it, but the unevenness still shows (is the leather too oily that it can't accept more pigment at the time?)

Should I just wear them until the leather dries out more and then re-cream again?
post #7123 of 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post
 

 

Just to make sure you are aware, AE Premium Shoe Polish is not made by Saphir.  I think it may be made by Collonil, however. 

 

Yes, you can achieve a mirror shine after you have nourished your shoes with traditional cream polish by adding paste wax.  The color of wax is largely personal preference, and depends on the look you are going for.

I realize the AE Premium Shoe Polish isn't made by Saphir, I just couldn't find a matching color by Saphir at the store I shopped. I thought the AE Premium Shoe Polish in Walnut would be better than Saphir Light Brown.

 

Would I be able to use Dark Brown wax on Walnut shoes? Or is that too much? I'm assuming Saphir Light Brown paste wax would do? I was just making sure I could use paste wax over the AE Premium Shoe Polish since it's different than the Saphir creme.

post #7124 of 10118
For sole edges try burnishing. Take a chunk of bees wax and rub it firmly and briskly on the sole edge. Then take a piece of canvas or denim and wrap it around your thumb . Dampen your fore finger and lightly wet a short area of the waxed sole edge. Rub as fast and as hard as you can with the canvas wrapped thumb . You will feel the surface become slick.continue this process all around the edge . Repeat if your the type who wears both belt and suspenders . If you are of a mechanical bent this process can be extrapolated to employ the use of common workshop power tools
post #7125 of 10118

Talking of burnishing, I seem to have lost the 'burnish' on my Loake's Chester tan Brogues, probably owing to too much cleaning/renovating. Would it be a good idea, or not, to polish them with one coat of black cream? Or would I be left with a complete mess?

 

On balance, I would prefer to avoid a complete mess.

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