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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 461

post #6901 of 11395
I will also add that I just ordered some GlenKaren shoe products. Proudly.
post #6902 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I turn the shoes upside down at an angle, (the shoe opening pointing towards the ground with the sole at about a 45 degree angle) and I literally pour Lexol on the underside of the tongue so it acts as a slide for the conditioner into the shoe. Then I just get my hand in there and blindly wipe it on the ball area of the upper lining and everywhere else. It does a good job of absorbing everything just using your hand. If it doesn't you can just shove an old t shirt in there to absorb the rest. I don't over think it really, doing this is better than doing nothing. I then put the trees back in so that should absorb extra as well.

I would be careful doing this on shoes that use gemming. If you get too much conditioner in there and it seeps in between the insole and upper lining it can loosen the glue that holds the gemming in place causing it to shift when you get a resole.

 

 

Eliminating the use of a cloth is probably my best bet.  It's taking up too much room.  I've never used Lexol, even though many speak highly of it.  Is it thin enough to "run" into the shoe?  Most conditioners are more of a lotion consistency, thus requiring more spreading.

post #6903 of 11395
Lexol is like a thicker water. Not lotion-like at all. Soaks into leather better than anything I have used.
post #6904 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Lexol is like a thicker water. Not lotion-like at all. Soaks into leather better than anything I have used.

 

 

Good to know, thanks.

post #6905 of 11395

I have a marginal preference for filling my shoes with Lexol and walking in them. Every few yards, it pays to top the shoes up. In this way, your shoes benefit and so do your feet. Carry a can of Lexol wherever you go. 

post #6906 of 11395

I thrifted a pair of Hanover longwings in #8 shell over the weekend. The leather wasn't particularly dry or anything, but they still needed a good cleaning and conditioning.

 

I forgot to take a picture of the original condition, but it was quite dusty.

 

Did a quick brushing and then followed with Lexol Cleaner (first experiment with this on shell; worked fine). Followed this with a quick buffing.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

After using Renovateur. I don't like using Lexol Conditioner on shell cordovan as it takes off quite a bit of the finish.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Brushing after using Renovateur.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Applied a liberal amount of AE's Cordovan Creme. 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Post-brushing. I forgot to apply Cordovan Creme to the tongue :facepalm:

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Final product after a good heaping of brushing with the horsehair. The overall process took about an hour. The shoes were in pretty good condition as they were so they didn't need a second or third application of Renovateur unlike some of my other vintage shells.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

post #6907 of 11395
I recently bought my first pair of oxford boots and noticed that in one boot the tongue keeps drifting to the side of the boot which looks and feels awkward. Upon further inspection, it seems the tongue in this boot is misaligned (it looks to be a bit twisted, see pictures).

Has any of you ever seen this before and what can be done to fix this? Or is this considered normal behavior?



post #6908 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post


This response did remind me that I've been meaning to ask the input of the others in this thread on conditioning the inside of your shoes.  While I do what I said above, I never look forward to it.  I have yet to figure out an easy way to condition the insides of my shoes.  I get quite frustrated with trying to condition the inside from the ball of the foot area forward.  You can't see what you are doing, because your hand is in the way.  Stuffing your hand into your shoe and then "blindly" trying to rub in the conditioner, while making sure that you aren't missing areas while over conditioning other areas is my issue.  Inevitably, I dab some conditioner onto the cloth and then as I'm reaching into the shoe, half of it gets rubbed off somewhere else before I can get to the area that I'm aiming for.   Not to mention the lint that turns the whole process into a sloppy mess.  I try to reach in and pinch out the lint that accumulates in front of the toes, but there is always a dusty residue left, and the conditioner soaks it into some sort of a putty.  I even tried vacuuming it out with a vacuum nozzle once, but the angle wouldn't quite reach properly.

Maybe I would have better luck with cotton balls rather than a rag?

Maybe I should start working on patenting a vacuum nozzle that is shaped like the forepart of a shoe tree! mwink%5B1%5D.gif

Edge Dressing Dauber:
post #6909 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post


This response did remind me that I've been meaning to ask the input of the others in this thread on conditioning the inside of your shoes.  While I do what I said above, I never look forward to it.  I have yet to figure out an easy way to condition the insides of my shoes.  I get quite frustrated with trying to condition the inside from the ball of the foot area forward.  You can't see what you are doing, because your hand is in the way.  Stuffing your hand into your shoe and then "blindly" trying to rub in the conditioner, while making sure that you aren't missing areas while over conditioning other areas is my issue.  Inevitably, I dab some conditioner onto the cloth and then as I'm reaching into the shoe, half of it gets rubbed off somewhere else before I can get to the area that I'm aiming for.   Not to mention the lint that turns the whole process into a sloppy mess.  I try to reach in and pinch out the lint that accumulates in front of the toes, but there is always a dusty residue left, and the conditioner soaks it into some sort of a putty.  I even tried vacuuming it out with a vacuum nozzle once, but the angle wouldn't quite reach properly.

Maybe I would have better luck with cotton balls rather than a rag?

Maybe I should start working on patenting a vacuum nozzle that is shaped like the forepart of a shoe tree! mwink%5B1%5D.gif

Soaked cotton pad/ball + chopstick. Works wonders with great control.
post #6910 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post


Edge Dressing Dauber:

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Soaked cotton pad/ball + chopstick. Works wonders with great control.

 

Both excellent recommendations!

post #6911 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Mink oil and beeswax serve two different purposes for shoe care and aren't mutually exclusive for proper shoe care. Mink oil is a conditioner, whereas beeswax is what raises a shine and gives protection against a bit of moisture.

 

Source? My source says beeswax is a conditioner too: 

http://www.renapur.com/

post #6912 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by name View Post
 

 

Source? My source says beeswax is a conditioner too:

http://www.renapur.com/

 

 

That product has oils in it, which they claim are serving as conditioners (jojoba oil and avocado oil).  The beeswax isn't the conditioning agent.

post #6913 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post
 

 

 

That product has oils in it, which they claim are serving as conditioners (jojoba oil and avocado oil).  The beeswax isn't the conditioning agent.

 

Truly. And how about ethics and mink oil? You know it is a by product of fur trade (AFAIK). Any natural or effective alternative?

post #6914 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by name View Post
 

 

Truly. And how about ethics and mink oil? You know it is a by product of fur trade (AFAIK). Any natural or effective alternative?

 

 

There are natural alternatives.  I'm not so sure I have a problem with the way mink oil is derived, if in fact it is a similar process to any other farmed animal use.

 

See this short Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mink_oil

 

I don't get up in arms over cows and chickens being raised for consumption, so I don't see why I should feel differently about the mink.  It sounds like they are using the entire animal, which I think is appropriate. 

 

I am all about humane treatment of animals, and my food practices reflect that with the types of meat I buy, as far as I can reasonably control that.

post #6915 of 11395
Quote:
Originally Posted by englade321 View Post

I applied it with my dick for a while but I found it left a smeary finish and my wife complained about the smell
Nice. I thought about that but didn't want to get my body dirty.

I meant what technique are you using. Spray water before or after? Horsehair or cloth?
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