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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 460

post #6886 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromega View Post



 

Those are in wonderful condition! I wish I could find this kind of stuff at Value Village (I am also from Canada). Do what Benhour has said already, but as for the heels, both cobblers and Benhour are correct.

The heels and soles look to be in great condition which should give you a long time of travels before resoling is required. The problem with nailed leather heels is that they are extremely slippery on carpets and waxed floors. They can also cause damage to hardwood. Replacing the heels with rubber heels will prevent all of that from happening. 

post #6887 of 10092
Thanks, fellas. It's both heels that need work, for sure. They're are worn down at the back edge, but the rest of the sole should be fine once toe taps are in place. Should I be asking/warning the cobbler about the anything before getting the heels replaced, or is it really just a standard job? I'd prefer if the repairs done are kept in line with the original work as much as possible.
post #6888 of 10092

Does this thread have a sticky? (We should make one in the first post.) Or am I supposed to read through all 460 pages or how it is supposed to work? Thanks.

 

How are you supposed to take care of the inside of your shoes if you intend them to last for 20 years? How about using lightweight odor-reducing insoles (such as Scholl) even if your feet are not that stinky? ;)


Edited by name - 10/1/13 at 5:52am
post #6889 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I am probably older than most people on this thread. It occurs to me that I don't need/want my shoes to last me 20 years. I have lately taken the view that what I will do is to buy shoes that I think are stylish but - more than anything else - are comfortable. This also means that I won't buy in a particular price range or shoes made by a particular range of makers. As you get older, you get more invisible, so no longer have to buy shoes for other people to look at - if other people ever look at our shoes. It does seem to be that 'comfort' is probably one of the most important features about what we put on our feet. Comfort and style, perhaps. Just some thoughts!

We want your shoes to last 20 years so when you have your estate sale we can cop em' for cheap! wink.gif
post #6890 of 10092

Mink oil or beeswax? https://www.google.com/search?q=mink+beeswax

 

This search term has many leather related results though not one I have found is about style or shoes.

post #6891 of 10092
Mink oil and beeswax serve two different purposes for shoe care and aren't mutually exclusive for proper shoe care. Mink oil is a conditioner, whereas beeswax is what raises a shine and gives protection against a bit of moisture.
post #6892 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by name View Post
 

Does this thread have a sticky? (We should make one in the first post.) Or am I supposed to read through all 460 pages or how it is supposed to work? Thanks.

 

How are you supposed to take care of the inside of your shoes if you intend them to last for 20 years? How about using lightweight odor-reducing insoles (such as Scholl) even if your feet are not that stinky? ;)

 

 

Excuse my ignorance, but I'm not sure what you mean by a "sticky."

 

As for the care of the inside of your shoes...  Keep wooden shoe trees in them whenever you aren't wearing them.  Rub some conditioner into the lining and insole periodically (I try to about twice a year).  If your feet aren't very stinky, then you shouldn't need an odor reducing insole, and the insole will change fit characteristics.  If you don't need an insole for fit reasons, I'd stay away from them.  Use cedar shoe trees instead of some other wood, to help keep them smelling good.

post #6893 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post
 

 

 

Excuse my ignorance, but I'm not sure what you mean by a "sticky."

 

As for the care of the inside of your shoes...  Keep wooden shoe trees in them whenever you aren't wearing them.  Rub some conditioner into the lining and insole periodically (I try to about twice a year).  If your feet aren't very stinky, then you shouldn't need an odor reducing insole, and the insole will change fit characteristics.  If you don't need an insole for fit reasons, I'd stay away from them.  Use cedar shoe trees instead of some other wood, to help keep them smelling good.

 

afaik, a sticky would be a directory of all the good posts in this thread. Usually used for reference or to get someone running quickly instead of sifting through hundreds of pages.

post #6894 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lirum View Post
 

 

afaik, a sticky would be a directory of all the good posts in this thread. Usually used for reference or to get someone running quickly instead of sifting through hundreds of pages.

 

 

I assumed as much.  I guess I also could have Googled it. :D

post #6895 of 10092

I will leave you my shoes in my will, Patrick, but I fear you might want to give them to a charity shop! :lookaround: 

post #6896 of 10092
I am a charity shop!
post #6897 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post
 

 

 

Excuse my ignorance, but I'm not sure what you mean by a "sticky."

 

As for the care of the inside of your shoes...  Keep wooden shoe trees in them whenever you aren't wearing them.  Rub some conditioner into the lining and insole periodically (I try to about twice a year).  If your feet aren't very stinky, then you shouldn't need an odor reducing insole, and the insole will change fit characteristics.  If you don't need an insole for fit reasons, I'd stay away from them.  Use cedar shoe trees instead of some other wood, to help keep them smelling good.

 

 

This response did remind me that I've been meaning to ask the input of the others in this thread on conditioning the inside of your shoes.  While I do what I said above, I never look forward to it.  I have yet to figure out an easy way to condition the insides of my shoes.  I get quite frustrated with trying to condition the inside from the ball of the foot area forward.  You can't see what you are doing, because your hand is in the way.  Stuffing your hand into your shoe and then "blindly" trying to rub in the conditioner, while making sure that you aren't missing areas while over conditioning other areas is my issue.  Inevitably, I dab some conditioner onto the cloth and then as I'm reaching into the shoe, half of it gets rubbed off somewhere else before I can get to the area that I'm aiming for.   Not to mention the lint that turns the whole process into a sloppy mess.  I try to reach in and pinch out the lint that accumulates in front of the toes, but there is always a dusty residue left, and the conditioner soaks it into some sort of a putty.  I even tried vacuuming it out with a vacuum nozzle once, but the angle wouldn't quite reach properly.

 

Maybe I would have better luck with cotton balls rather than a rag?

 

Maybe I should start working on patenting a vacuum nozzle that is shaped like the forepart of a shoe tree! :smarmy:

post #6898 of 10092
I think pB mentioned a method for that a couple days ago. Or was that another thread
post #6899 of 10092
Quote:
Originally Posted by englade321 View Post

I think pB mentioned a method for that a couple days ago. Or was that another thread

 

 

Hmm... I didn't see it here.  Let me know if you find it, or maybe Patrick will chime in.

post #6900 of 10092
I turn the shoes upside down at an angle, (the shoe opening pointing towards the ground with the sole at about a 45 degree angle) and I literally pour Lexol on the underside of the tongue so it acts as a slide for the conditioner into the shoe. Then I just get my hand in there and blindly wipe it on the ball area of the upper lining and everywhere else. It does a good job of absorbing everything just using your hand. If it doesn't you can just shove an old t shirt in there to absorb the rest. I don't over think it really, doing this is better than doing nothing. I then put the trees back in so that should absorb extra as well.

I would be careful doing this on shoes that use gemming. If you get too much conditioner in there and it seeps in between the insole and upper lining it can loosen the glue that holds the gemming in place causing it to shift when you get a resole.
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