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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 459

post #6871 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post


You can try Lexol leather cleaner first if you like. If that does not work to your satisfaction then you may want to try RenoMat. If you are too aggressive with RenoMat you can also remove the leather finish, so keep that in mind if you use it.

 

Really appreciate it, i'll certainly be erring on the side of caution

post #6872 of 12413

After polishing my shoes, i noticed the parts of the leather where profound creases were began to look like this. Is this is the consequence of too much polish in a heavily wearing area which causes the excess polish to crack? If so, is there any way to remove the polish? I've heard of people using nail polish remover to strip polish from shoes but i'm a bit scared of it. Any feedback would be great. Also, please excuse the phone quality photos. 

 

 

  

post #6873 of 12413

There's a cobbler in town who sells shit that people don't come back for. Problem is, rack after rack of this stuff is displayed in almost direct sunlight. He's on the same side of the street that I park for work, and I've been passing the same shoes for over a year. So most of the shoes are faded, but beyond dry leather, they're fine.

 

Barring worse damage, can I re-stain a faded shoe and bring it back?

post #6874 of 12413

" This also means that I won't buy in a particular price range or shoes made by a particular range of makers."

 

Hello Glenjay. First of all, I can't afford shoes in the region of £400 and above, so that rules out my experiencing the comfort of shoes in the upper price bracket. I certainly didn't mean to infer that higher priced shoes are bought only for their looks.

 

My experience has been that  shoes in lower price brackets, not made by companies well known for making the best shoes, can also be very comfortable and look good.  Thus by suggesting I won't buy in a particular price range, I am really referring to not buying in the higher price range but the lower. And I won't, particularly, look for 'names'. As you suggested: "I think it comes down to finding the best fit within your budget". That sums up my position.

 

I hope the day never comes when I wear velcro fastening shoes! Thanks and best wishes for your message. 

post #6875 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerryberry View Post
 

After polishing my shoes, i noticed the parts of the leather where profound creases were began to look like this. Is this is the consequence of too much polish in a heavily wearing area which causes the excess polish to crack? If so, is there any way to remove the polish? I've heard of people using nail polish remover to strip polish from shoes but i'm a bit scared of it. Any feedback would be great. Also, please excuse the phone quality photos.

 

 

  

from the photos these marks across the creasing looks like build up polish braking!! for cleaning try to use lexol leather cleaner or renovateur and if this wont work for you go with the renomat!! leave the acetone(nail polish remover) as the last measure cause it the most aggressive !! i think with the first group of products you ll be fine:happy:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lirum View Post
 

There's a cobbler in town who sells shit that people don't come back for. Problem is, rack after rack of this stuff is displayed in almost direct sunlight. He's on the same side of the street that I park for work, and I've been passing the same shoes for over a year. So most of the shoes are faded, but beyond dry leather, they're fine.

 

Barring worse damage, can I re-stain a faded shoe and bring it back?

for the bolded words: i cant understand how this is possible but ok!!

 

yes you can!! its quite easy!! you can do it by using a cream polish with matching color or with dye! dont forget to condition shoes before wearing them!!

 

btw most of the time only by the use of a conditioner(renovateur-lexol-1909 leather cream) the faded color(most of the time looks like that from dryness) comes back close to the original color with some patina!! so i recommend do that first and if you are not satisfied witht the outcome go with the other way!!

post #6876 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by masernaut View Post
 

 

It's hard to describe the scent, but I don't find it 'rancid.' It smells very oily- like a blend of olive oil and mustard oil. 

I tried to pop open the bottle and it squeezed a bit of conditioner on my hand. That's all I can smell now, haha.

 

Thank you for your answer. I come to the conclusion that both bottles are old and therefore smell funny. I like how the Lexol works but turnaround time seems to be a problem in Europe. I will try to order from UK.

 

Again, thanks for taking the time to check.

 

Florian

post #6877 of 12413

Are the creases in the shoes, in the photos above, posted by Jerryberry ones that fairly naturally occur in corrected grain shoes?

post #6878 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Are the creases in the shoes, in the photos above, posted by Jerryberry ones that fairly naturally occur in corrected grain shoes?

Those are creases near the toe box where the foot naturally bends during walking.  It is near impossible to avoid such creases.  Learn to embrace them, and polish the toe up to the point of creasing.  Polishing anything above the crease will only lead to cracked polish.

post #6879 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

I'm not a fan of those J&Ms Sam H, no offense.

 

Hey sorry for the late reply, not been paying attention. No offense taken, what part is it specifically though? And is it the before or after? I know at the end of the day I'm working with corrected grain $100 shoes, but what is it besides that that stands out and is it related to my refinishing or just the shoe in general?

post #6880 of 12413

Hello Sam H

On balance, I feel that leaving shoes as they are may be the best bet. From what you say, I imagine you bought them knowing that they were corrected grain shoes. What I am not so sure about is why you wanted to change them so radically. While what you have done to this pair looks good, perhaps it would be better, next time, to buy the shoes that you really want, rather than changing a pair into something else. As has been discussed on this thread, the difference in price between calf leather shoes and corrected grain shoes may not be so great. 


Edited by Munky - 9/30/13 at 12:26pm
post #6881 of 12413

I recently bought a pair of Ecco chukkas for travel shoes - easy to slip on and off at airport, comfortable for being on my feet, all the usual reasons.

 

I have 2 questions:

1. Do I use shoe trees on chukkas?

2. What do you recommend for shoe care on a distressed/ relaxed leather? I was thinking of some Venetian Shoe Cream every so often to condition, clean and give some shine... other thoughts are very welcome!

post #6882 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noo Guy View Post
 

I recently bought a pair of Ecco chukkas for travel shoes - easy to slip on and off at airport, comfortable for being on my feet, all the usual reasons.

 

I have 2 questions:

1. Do I use shoe trees on chukkas?

2. What do you recommend for shoe care on a distressed/ relaxed leather? I was thinking of some Venetian Shoe Cream every so often to condition, clean and give some shine... other thoughts are very welcome!

 

1. I do

2. That is a fine approach

post #6883 of 12413
Avoid Venetian cause it has petroleum distillates ! I would use renovateur !
post #6884 of 12413
I picked up these shoes at a Canadian Value Village. From what I've learned, these are John McHale gunboat shoes from the late 50s or early 60s. I took them into a local shoe repair shop and the owner, an old guy whose been around for a few decades, said he's familiar with the company and thinks they're likely from the 60s (there is scant information available about the company on the internet, but enough to make me think these are quality vintage...I also tracked down the grandson of John McHale to talk about the company and confirm some of the facts floating around the web).

Anyway, I haven't really cared for vintage shoes like these before and I was wondering what kind of stuff to slather on to clean and protect them. I have Meltonian all-purpose cleaner and conditioner, but I don't know if that's the best thing for this job. Something like it and then clear polish?

Also, they need new soles and two different cobblers said I should replace the heels with rubber heals. I'm thinking I should use a leather heal with a rubber insert and put on toe taps. Recommendations?



post #6885 of 12413
Quote:
Originally Posted by fromega View Post

I picked up these shoes at a Canadian Value Village. From what I've learned, these are John McHale gunboat shoes from the late 50s or early 60s. I took them into a local shoe repair shop and the owner, an old guy whose been around for a few decades, said he's familiar with the company and thinks they're likely from the 60s (there is scant information available about the company on the internet, but enough to make me think these are quality vintage...I also tracked down the grandson of John McHale to talk about the company and confirm some of the facts floating around the web).

Anyway, I haven't really cared for vintage shoes like these before and I was wondering what kind of stuff to slather on to clean and protect them. I have Meltonian all-purpose cleaner and conditioner, but I don't know if that's the best thing for this job. Something like it and then clear polish?

Also, they need new soles and two different cobblers said I should replace the heels with rubber heals. I'm thinking I should use a leather heal with a rubber insert and put on toe taps. Recommendations?



 

first of all the shoes judging from their age look in really good condition!!

 

the soles dont need a replacement at all (the stitching is intact except toes which is completely reasonable!!! they are in great shape but they need some conditioning for sure ) !!a toe steel guard is a must!!

 

about the heels!! i think some sanding and a placement of a half leather half rubber last layer ll be what you need and ll keep the originality of the shoes!!

 

about the conditioning issue  i would use lexol leather cleaner first to lightly clean the surface!!

then i would use renovateur alone or combined with 1909 leather cream of collonil to condition the leather at first and let it to soak in!!

without buffing at the end so not to create a barrier!!

some gents here(i am sure chogal will :rotflmao: ) will disagree on that but judging from the fact the the shoes are not conditioned for over 50years i would use dubbin as the final conditioning agent(2 applies at the flexing points)! this ll need about 24hours to completely absorbed so you could raise a shine!!!

 

dont forget soles!!! leave the shoes rest for about 24hours  and buff!! wait another 24 hours and now you can polish them with a cream or a wax polish!!

hope i helped a little bit and i am sure a lot of gents-friends ll give some alternative options

 

enjoy your vintage diamonds!! :happy:

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