or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 458

post #6856 of 11875
I'm considering it. I will also send him the receipt from the cobbler and a new pair of shoetrees. For which operations my cobbler finds necessary. If my shoes survive this, that is. Else he owe me a new pair.
post #6857 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I remember in my early 20's (not that long ago). I would go out to a bar get blackout drunk and when I woke up my shoes look like they went through a battlefield of foreign substances. I had a dedicated pair of "bar shoes".

 

I still own a pair of beat up suede loafers for that scene, it's amazing how black and sticky those floors can be!

post #6858 of 11875
There is a shallow dent with central dark spot on these seconds (RL Saunders) at center of image. Not a big deal to me but I'd like to lighten the shade of the spot if I can. Any recommendations? (X-post with AE thread)
post #6859 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnr View Post

I'm considering it. I will also send him the receipt from the cobbler and a new pair of shoetrees. For which operations my cobbler finds necessary. If my shoes survive this, that is. Else he owe me a new pair.

 

Did you try stuffing the shoes with newspaper? That usually helps dry them out pretty quickly. Truly sorry what happened to your shoes, that guys sounds beyond ignorant.

 

Who in their right mind is afraid of a well kept, shoe collection, absolutely mind boggling. 

post #6860 of 11875
Rider boots leather outsole protrude a couple MM too much for my taste giving them a cowboyesque look. The welt stiching is underneath the leather boot so all the leather outsole is superficial. Anyone have a recommendation on what I can do. I could shave it away but it's unlikely I can get it uniform. is this something anyone here has considered doing?





post #6861 of 11875
A skilled cobbler could do it.
post #6862 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnr View Post

I will take the shoes to a cobbler and see how it holds up, it's been wet for 48 hours... I fear they have begun to rot. Seems like one of my new classmates doesn't like me.

Since the beer was poured into the shoe the cobbler will probably have to soak the shoe in water to flush out the sugars left by the alcohol (liquor is much worse than beer), and he should do this to both shoes to keep the impact consistent. The shoes would then be conditioned with leather conditioner and polished, and should look like new.

The shoe tree can just be washed off with dish soap and warm water.
post #6863 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by adam-r8 View Post

...
I purchased a pair of oxfords that have been polished with oxblood from a mid/dark brown and there is slight flaking of the polish.  Is this a natural thing that will be resolved once adding conditioner and going through the process outlined by Glenjay?  My worry is that this will carry on even after that and could it be the quality of polish used (Kiwi Paste)?

Kiwi polish isn't any more prone to flaking than any other paste polish. Flaking is related to wax cracking and losing adhesion to itself, typically caused by using too much wax. If you do have wax flaking going on I would strip the shoes down to the factory finish and start over. Although it doesn't sound like you have put a lot of polish on the shoes, it actually takes very little to produce and keep a shine.

In regard to corrected grain finish (which I don't think these are): Wax has no real adverse affect on corrected grain, except, perhaps, to dull the shine a little depending on the finish. The depth of the applied corrected grain finish (typically an acrylic) will determine how effective or ineffective shoe polish will be. On a thicker finish the oils cannot penetrate well so they sit on top. The solvents can also slowly breakdown the acrylic finish over multiple applications, which may cause the finish to begin to flake rather than the wax.
post #6864 of 11875
Thank you for reposting my steps on shoe polishing NAMOR, I appreciate it, and I appreciate all the positive response it received. Thanks guys.
post #6865 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post


Kiwi polish isn't any more prone to flaking than any other paste polish. Flaking is related to wax cracking and losing adhesion to itself, typically caused by using too much wax. If you do have wax flaking going on I would strip the shoes down to the factory finish and start over. Although it doesn't sound like you have put a lot of polish on the shoes, it actually takes very little to produce and keep a shine.

In regard to corrected grain finish (which I don't think these are): Wax has no real adverse affect on corrected grain, except, perhaps, to dull the shine a little depending on the finish. The depth of the applied corrected grain finish (typically an acrylic) will determine how effective or ineffective shoe polish will be. On a thicker finish the oils cannot penetrate well so they sit on top. The solvents can also slowly breakdown the acrylic finish over multiple applications, which may cause the finish to begin to flake rather than the wax.

 

Thanks for the detailed info.  I have not actually polished them at all, this was done by the store to presumably spruce up a non-selling shoe (it worked!).  I agree that stripping is likely the only solution as further coats will only enhance the flaking and i'm actually interested to see the original brown.  Lexol is the thing for this right?  

post #6866 of 11875

I am probably older than most people on this thread. It occurs to me that I don't need/want my shoes to last me 20 years. I have lately taken the view that what I will do is to buy shoes that I think are stylish but - more than anything else - are comfortable. This also means that I won't buy in a particular price range or shoes made by a particular range of makers. As you get older, you get more invisible, so no longer have to buy shoes for other people to look at - if other people ever look at our shoes. It does seem to be that 'comfort' is probably one of the most important features about what we put on our feet. Comfort and style, perhaps. Just some thoughts!

post #6867 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

Rider boots leather outsole protrude a couple MM too much for my taste giving them a cowboyesque look. The welt stiching is underneath the leather boot so all the leather outsole is superficial. Anyone have a recommendation on what I can do. I could shave it away but it's unlikely I can get it uniform. is this something anyone here has considered doing?





My 2 cents - there is absolutely nothing cowboyesque about them. Don't mess with them. Those are great boots.
post #6868 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by adam-r8 View Post

Thanks for the detailed info.  I have not actually polished them at all, this was done by the store to presumably spruce up a non-selling shoe (it worked!).  I agree that stripping is likely the only solution as further coats will only enhance the flaking and i'm actually interested to see the original brown.  Lexol is the thing for this right?  

You can try Lexol leather cleaner first if you like. If that does not work to your satisfaction then you may want to try RenoMat. If you are too aggressive with RenoMat you can also remove the leather finish, so keep that in mind if you use it.
post #6869 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I am probably older than most people on this thread. It occurs to me that I don't need/want my shoes to last me 20 years. I have lately taken the view that what I will do is to buy shoes that I think are stylish but - more than anything else - are comfortable. This also means that I won't buy in a particular price range or shoes made by a particular range of makers. As you get older, you get more invisible, so no longer have to buy shoes for other people to look at - if other people ever look at our shoes. It does seem to be that 'comfort' is probably one of the most important features about what we put on our feet. Comfort and style, perhaps. Just some thoughts!

Could you expound on the part of your comment that I have highlighted?

I inferred that to mean you feel shoes at the higher end of the price range ($800+) are more about looks than comfort. If that is your position, then I would tend to disagree.

First, let me clarify the context being leather business/dress shoes; Velcro closure, rubber soled walking shoes, are probably more comfortable than most leather oxfords, but look terrible with a business suit.

In my opinion, I believe that the shape of the last is the major definer of comfort in a shoe (if the shoe is properly fitted). Arch support and quality of insole also play a role. Finding a last shape that fits your foot shape is the most important thing for comfort to me. This is the main reason bespoke shoes fit so well; because the last has be created/modified to match the shape of your foot.

I have also found that lasts made by the higher end shoe makers have more nuances in the shapes of the lasts to better conform to foot shape, regardless of the last style. You can see this simply by comparing a shoe made by a maker like Allen Edmonds versus Edward Green or John Lobb. Whether the difference in cost is worth the difference in comfort is a personal perspective.

I personally don't buy shoes based on what others might think of the shoes specifically. I buy shoes based on a number of factors like: Do they feel comfortable, do they fit my style and therefore my wardrobe, are they well constructed, and are the materials of good quality. Of course the visual appeal has to be there for me to be attracted to them in the first place.

Certainly, comfortable shoes can be found for less than $500, but I can tell you that even though I have Allen Edmond shoes that fit me comfortably, my John Lobb shoes fit like brown on natural rice.

I think it comes down to finding the best fit within your budget.
post #6870 of 11875
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

Rider boots leather outsole protrude a couple MM too much for my taste giving them a cowboyesque look. The welt stiching is underneath the leather boot so all the leather outsole is superficial. Anyone have a recommendation on what I can do. I could shave it away but it's unlikely I can get it uniform. is this something anyone here has considered doing?





 

wouldn't mess with the welt/outsole trimming if you want them to be serviceable.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**