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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 443

post #6631 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post
 

W.S. Robson's shoe wax.  Not sure if the solid gel spheres are wax or other ingredients, will post picture when I have time.

 

http://www.chainbridgehoney.co.uk/Beeswax-Polish__c-p-0-0-29.aspx

thank you  Chogall!! much appreciated

post #6632 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by gyasih View Post

Anyone have a picture or something that shows how much Renovatour they use? Three pea size dabs, as per instructions, don't seem to do it.

Below would be one pea size dab.

http://www.boq.jp/shoes/shoecare/05/index.htm
e9599595e7ee3acb161c1776dc0e61c813d4b0c9.jpg
4a1cf56821a72a0e6fa0c37c575fc8580dc8c7fc.jpg


The following experiment was done by NHK (Japan's national public broadcasting organization). (Unfortunately youtube is a dead link. http://www.wretch.cc/blog/yisa/5817042)

An excessive amount of Kiwi polish was applied on the right shoe (red label), a minimum amount of Kiwi polish on the left shoe (blue label).

b7b719ce.jpg


After 5 min jogging, both shoes were put into a plastic box and humidity inside each shoe was measured at the same time, which was almost same. (the right shoe 76.5 %RH, the left shoe 74.6 %RH)

d86ca109.jpg


Taking 5 min rest inside the box, humidity inside each shoe was measured again. The right shoe was 68.9 %RH and the left shoe 48.6 %RH.

a66ded46.jpg


BTW, below is interesting photos. A corrected grain being stripped, a scar emerged from underneath it.

http://onthedesk.jugem.jp/?eid=446
20130901_113059.jpg
20130901_113060.jpg
20130901_113061.jpg
post #6633 of 11915
I don't know about the whole heating up your way thing... Oils get volatile and break down under high heat. Think about the smoke point of different oils and such for cooking. Over certain temps it can't be good. FWIW, I kind of like wax polish when it gets older, drier and clumpy. The turpentine evaporates and makes shining better. Also, I'm not sold on turpentine being "ok", or "good" for leather anyway. But like behour said, using a heat gun... not sure that's the best idea for the oils themselves. Sounds like you are risking breaking down the oils to rid the solvent...
post #6634 of 11915
Vegtan, I am not sure what the point of that humidity test is... I mean essentially the shoe with more wax over it is holding the humidity in the shoe disallowing it to evaporate out as easily, right? What does this mean?
post #6635 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Vegtan, I am not sure what the point of that humidity test is... I mean essentially the shoe with more wax over it is holding the humidity in the shoe disallowing it to evaporate out as easily, right? What does this mean?

 

It just sounds to me like another case of showing why using too much wax on a shoe will prematurely destroy it from the inside out.  The interior relative humidity is showing that moisture can't escape the leather due to being sealed in by the wax.  The whole purpose of resting your shoes and using shoe trees is to allow the leather to properly dry and retain it's shape before being worn again.  Excessive wax is counterproductive for long-term shoe health.  

post #6636 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Vegtan, I am not sure what the point of that humidity test is... I mean essentially the shoe with more wax over it is holding the humidity in the shoe disallowing it to evaporate out as easily, right? What does this mean?

Yes and they say it means breathability and comfortableness.
Quote:
https://www.obenaufs.com/index.php?route=information/information&information_id=36

Your Leather Needs to Breathe!
We wear leather because it breathes and we stay comfortable. Never seal it off unless absolutely necessary! When pores are sealed the leather cannot breathe and you'll sweat like wearing rubber. Sealed leather is uncomfortable, stinks, and body acids, bacteria, and salt rot it from the inside out. Try wrapping your arm in cellophane wrap for a few hours to get a better understanding of what "sealing" your leather goods does to them, or imagine painting pine pitch or tar on your skin and sealing off the pores in this fashion. You can repel water easily and longer, resist chemicals, stay comfortable, and extend the useful life of your leather without sealing the pores. Simply extend the tanning process by regularly restoring the leather with proper natural oils.
post #6637 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

 But like behour said, using a heat gun... not sure that's the best idea for the oils themselves. Sounds like you are risking breaking down the oils to rid the solvent...

ofcourse and this is not good to do it at your polish!!! (btw  i heated it closed just to make it melt(not boiled it!!) then open the tin to let solvents evaporate, wax polish is melted by heat when it is packed in the tins!! i dont think this had any efect on oils!) consider that i did it to a half 50ml tin just to use it after for mirror shining toes!! so i didnt have to wory about the conditioning properties of the wax polish

 

 

vegtan nice link!! :nodding:

post #6638 of 11915
When someone does spit shine, the wax fills in the pours of the leather, is that bad as it stops the leather from breathing?
post #6639 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

When someone does spit shine, the wax fills in the pours of the leather, is that bad as it stops the leather from breathing?

if you wont over do it with polish and rotate your shoes there would be no problem at all!! and put unfished shoe trees after wear

post #6640 of 11915
Girlfriend has some nude colored Rag & Bone's that have some weird stains on it. I used a slightly damp cloth and finish just seems to come off it with water. Tried conditioning it a little with Reno but it looks just like oil stained on top. I'm pretty sure they are leather just not sure how to clean it if it is possible at all.

The oil on top:
post #6641 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post

Girlfriend has some nude colored Rag & Bone's that have some weird stains on it. I used a slightly damp cloth and finish just seems to come off it with water. Tried conditioning it a little with Reno but it looks just like oil stained on top. I'm pretty sure they are leather just not sure how to clean it if it is possible at all.
 

 

renomat or renovateur? if not renomat, try and get your hands on some.

post #6642 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwhitelaw View Post

renomat or renovateur? if not renomat, try and get your hands on some.
used reno, kinda worried renomat would strip finish?
post #6643 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post


used reno, kinda worried renomat would strip finish?

 

Both Renos perform a same function, i.e., cleaning and stripping, albeit to a different efficacy by concentration.  So, if Renovateur isn't doing anything, it's unlikely Reno'mat is the right tool, also bearing in mind that Reno'mat will strip the finish - that is Reno'mat's purpose.  

 

Some photos would be helpful in this case.

post #6644 of 11915
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevent View Post


used reno, kinda worried renomat would strip finish?

 

 

Impact on light colored shoes won't be as noticable.  Worse case you can reapply shoe creams and re-finish the shoes.  If renomat doesn't work, acetone.  But acetone will strip for sure.

post #6645 of 11915
I have some light brown sealskin shoes that are a little banged up. Should I just treat them like normal leather? Not a lot of info out there.
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