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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 408

post #6106 of 10595

T

This information is really helpful.
 

post #6107 of 10595

Thanks for your advice and help, wurger.

post #6108 of 10595
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Thanks for your advice and help, wurger.

No worries, mate. We all have our fair share of shoe fitting problems.shog[1].gif
post #6109 of 10595
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

 

The forte of these designer boots are the distressed process, not the quality of the material, shape of the last, details of the pattern, or the sturdiness of construction.  And they need to command a high listing price to sustain their brand's accessibility image.  Pretty sure you could find a similar used/thrown away pair at a Goodwill store.

 

p.s., yes, inferior leather.

 

Thanks for your input, chogall.  Confirms my suspicion.  I guess for these washed/distressed style Italian fashion boots (some of which do appeal to me), it's easier to start with "inferior" leather which has visible markings/defects as they can achieve the worn/distressed look much easier.

post #6110 of 10595
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

The forte of these designer boots are the distressed process, not the quality of the material, shape of the last, details of the pattern, or the sturdiness of construction.  And they need to command a high listing price to sustain their brand's accessibility image.  Pretty sure you could find a similar used/thrown away pair at a Goodwill store.

p.s., yes, inferior leather.
However fashion dictates.............
post #6111 of 10595
Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

especially the Japanese site where they were showing presumable tell-tale signs of inferior leather.

That is written by a man who worked as a leather buyer for 15 years at Japanese shoemaker, Otsuka, and is common knowledge for leather specialists. Here is another explanation;

Quote:
http://jamessaddlery.com.au/about-us/secrets/

The side of leather includes the leather from the neck, shoulder and belly. These areas make the poorest quality leather as they are very wrinkly and the continuous leg and neck movement mean the hide is soft and thin and the layers easily separate.

On the other hand a croupon (double bend) is made up of a full hide which is not cut into two along the back bone. Instead it is left intact and the poor quality neck, belly and shoulder is removed. Trevor James uses only croupon leather. This means that when you buy a James saddle you can be sure each and every part is prime leather and that no second rate leather can possibly find its way into a saddle even by accident.

The best way to check the quality of leather is to fold the leather back on itself. The grain should remain tight and cohesive. If it separates and wrinkling occurs the leather is poor quality.

secrets1.jpeg
Above - Poor quality leather wrinkles when bent.

secrets2.jpeg
Above - This good quality leather when bent shows no wrinkling or separation at all.


From American Leathers(1929)

1290c46c.png


Quote:
Originally Posted by BootSpell View Post

But I'm now wondering about the "washed" and distressed leathers of which many of the Italian boots are made (and not inexpensive boots either, some of them over $1k). Many of them seem to show signs of the veins are creases that are supposed to be avoided.? So are these inferior leathers? For example, this Italian boot...
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

Here is a schematic from American Leathers; Toe-tips and vamps are from bend, and quarters and tongues are from shoulder and belly. As written above, I think shoulder and belly are not used by high-quality shoemakers such as Edward Green and Cleverley, who say 3 pairs a calfskin.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_0hczSirzY#t=58
http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2010/05/bespoke-shoes-at-cleverley-part-5.html

c6d1e40f.png


Red wing uses whole steerhide, so some are relatively good quality and some are relatively poor quality.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/markestes/6281292999/in/set-72157627885241522



Washing and Spin-drying

http://web.stagram.com/n/officinecreativeitalia/?npk=381054394697244174_53765502&vm=grid
343f944c3f6a11e2826f22000a9f13e9_7.jpg
997ab5c03e6211e2b07922000a1fbd9b_7.jpg
Edited by VegTan - 7/6/13 at 11:25pm
post #6112 of 10595
Quote:
Originally Posted by VegTan View Post

That was written by a man who worked as a leather buyer for 15 years at Japanese shoemaker, Otsuka, and is a common knowledge for leather specialists. Here is anther explanation;
From American leathers(1929)

1290c46c.png
Here is a schematic from American leathers; Toe-tips and vamps are from bend, and quarters and tongues are from shoulder and belly. As written above, I think shoulder and belly are not used by high-quality shoemakers such as Edward Green and Cleverley, who say 3 pair a calfskin.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_0hczSirzY#t=58
http://www.permanentstyle.co.uk/2010/05/bespoke-shoes-at-cleverley-part-5.html

c6d1e40f.png


Red wing uses whole steerhide, so some are relatively good quality and some are relatively poor quality.
Washing and Spin-drying
veg tan If you did a thread on this it would not get buried in here this is great reference material plus the other stuff youve posted
thanks
post #6113 of 10595
^^^. Great post and info, vegtan. Thanks!
post #6114 of 10595

Thank you, Vegtan.

post #6115 of 10595
Great article
post #6116 of 10595
Yes, very good article VegTan. Thank you.
post #6117 of 10595

Anyone own hatch grain shoes? What do you do to care for the hatch grain leather?

post #6118 of 10595
Quote:
Originally Posted by joshuadowen View Post

Anyone own hatch grain shoes? What do you do to care for the hatch grain leather?

same as normal calf, although i probably wouldn't use wax as hatch grain looks better in a more relaxed low shine finish IMO. 

post #6119 of 10595
Great post, also second making a separate thread for that.
post #6120 of 10595
I do use wax, not the highly pigmented shoe cream, although I do not aim for a hard and glassy mirror shine.

With cream you ought to be careful, as the charm of the leather is it's variegated colour. Not only are the veins lighter than the rest of the leather, the main colour itself is "blotchy" (presumably sponged), there are lighter and darker spots.



http://www.aacrack.co.uk/catalogue.asp?product_id=18

If you use cream all the time, you are likely to change the colour of the leather to the colour of the product and you will lose the antique effect. So, use cream sparingly, only if you need to 'retouch' some blemishes.
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