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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 406

post #6076 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

 

it really depends on the leather.  but that look pronounced (if there're trees inside)

 

No shoe trees inside and it's calfskin. I put some rennovateur on it and it looks a bit better. Should I also put some cream on and let it sink in for awhile?

 

Just wondering why it would crease so much?

post #6077 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedStyleHelp View Post

No shoe trees inside and it's calfskin. I put some rennovateur on it and it looks a bit better. Should I also put some cream on and let it sink in for awhile?

Just wondering why it would crease so much?

Not an leather expert. But the creases are all at the right place.

Lack of shoe trees definitely contributed much of the creases. And also the leather. Shoes will crease always after being worn.
post #6078 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Not an leather expert. But the creases are all at the right place.

Lack of shoe trees definitely contributed much of the creases. And also the leather. Shoes will crease always after being worn.

 

Cool. I appreciate the replies.

post #6079 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

Boned calf is corrected grain. Both pairs are cg.

If the shoes in question are truly Boned Calf (which I believe they are), then they are not corrected grain leather.

Boned calf is basically highly polished wax calf. Wax calf, like cordovan shell, uses the flesh side of the leather as the exposed side of the upper (grain side inside). The flesh is shaved, infused with wax, and buffed very precisely to create a smooth and bright finish. Wax calf is commonly used in dress riding boots for equine related events like Dressage (where it would be insensitive to use cordovan shell ).

The reason the leather has a rolling effect like cordovan shell, and also creases like calf, is due to how it was made, and what it is made of.

If the shoes were corrected grain bookbinder leather you would not get the rolling effect in the leather as shown.
post #6080 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedStyleHelp View Post

Hey guys,

 

This is a picture of my Carmina's after their first wear. Is it too much creasing? I'm a bit nervous. 

 

If it is, what can I do to help, and stop in the future. Really appreciated!

 

as chogal said most of the creases are at the right place !! there are creases at the top of the vamp(at the first  shoelace line) witch most of the time apear when the shoe is  too small or the leather  is too thik(or unflexible)!nothing to worry about ecxept the cosmetic issue! i think when you buy shoes over 250-300(calf skin carmina price is 325-340) euro you have to buy shoe trees(wooden) at the same time!!

 

i think  putting shoetrees in them with some renovateur and after some dubbin at the vamp area(leave it about 2 days before buff) will make the creases a lot smouther!!!always put shoe trees after wearing them!!espeacially after an allday wear where your shoes are wet from sweat!!(if they dry without shoe trees creases are more noticeable)

post #6081 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

If the shoes in question are truly Boned Calf (which I believe they are), then they are not corrected grain leather.

Boned calf is basically highly polished wax calf. Wax calf, like cordovan shell, uses the flesh side of the leather as the exposed side of the upper (grain side inside). The flesh is shaved, infused with wax, and buffed very precisely to create a smooth and bright finish. Wax calf is commonly used in dress riding boots for equine related events like Dressage (where it would be insensitive to use cordovan shell ).

The reason the leather has a rolling effect like cordovan shell, and also creases like calf, is due to how it was made, and what it is made of.

If the shoes were corrected grain bookbinder leather you would not get the rolling effect in the leather as shown.

Thanks for correction, always a pleasure to learn. smile.gif I read something about it when googling before answering, and the majority concluded with it being cg. Would it be possible to see some more pictures of the shoes after some wear?
post #6082 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oli2012 View Post

Question -

If your shoes have no marks or discolouration is it necessary for the health of the shoe to polish them with a shoe cream?

The black Chelseas in my picture are 2 years old now and whilst I wear them frequently its in an office environment so they don't get scuffed etc. I've used saddle dressing on them once every 1-2 months.

 

Can someone advise me with this? :(

post #6083 of 12426
Well, shoe care is for the prevention of serious cracking and damage.

It's like there is no point in taking the vaccination after you got the flu. smile.gif
post #6084 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by wurger View Post

Well, shoe care is for the prevention of serious cracking and damage.

It's like there is no point in taking the vaccination after you got the flu. smile.gif

But it's not the polish that stops the cracking, it's the conditioner.
post #6085 of 12426
Ah, I actually didn't pick up the saddle dressing, so I just mentioned general care, sorry mate.

Isn't shoe cream basically a leather conditioner with a colour dye?
post #6086 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeedStyleHelp View Post

Hey guys,

This is a picture of my Carmina's after their first wear. Is it too much creasing? I'm a bit nervous.?

If it is, what can I do to help, and stop in the future. Really appreciated!
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)



They seem to be slightly loose grain.

Quote:
http://www.leatherchemists.org/dictionary.asp
Flanky: A characteristic of loose grain leather that forms coarse wrinkles on bending with the grain inward.

http://www.leathermag.com/features/featurefloater-leathers-require-a-loose-grain
Loose grain occurs when the two layers of the hide with totally different structures, the papillary layer and reticular layer, no longer interconnect as strongly as before. For normal upper leathers this junction is strengthened or supported by retanning.


Genuine loose grain

From Men's Ex magazine
Quote:
http://xbrand.yahoo.co.jp/category/fashion/5346/1.html

10 points to be checked

About leathers;

2. Coarse wrinkles; loose grain(6) or loose leather(7)

41754b15c62c698ffc138359f09c0bf1.jpg


6. Loose grain is a cause for cracking (Must-avoid)

46fd70e910b17f3452626cabe2a33995.jpg


9. Veins are hollow and liable to crack (Must-avoid)

af17bab5b64c1f42122875983c80d2d6.jpg


3. Natural marks are a proof of natural leathers and less pigments

f3aee724bf8de2691fb6ba7fa18902d2.jpg


7. Using belly(loose leather) is cost-cutting

1ce1e787d3d5a4d5dfaf99a5bbd9ace2.jpg


10. Shaggy suede

305b7b763a28f69b83e78cd682ff4890.jpg


About constructions;

1. Loose or visible welt-stitches are a cause for penetration of water (Must-avoid)

8db965d4d5961f13c0e9d87f85365d47.jpg


8. Opening of top-line when wearing shoes is a cause for losing shape (Must-avoid)

8728f21cffc2015dc6d0c4ab041a3d1a.jpg
e093de5e4845e46ce941a682fd9253bd.jpg
warau.jpg
(The dashed line means opening of top line)


4. Roundish outsoles are important for comfortable walking

ebae5725710fec910f5afca932880073.jpg
06b4559a54dde62b9127920a26837f1f.jpg


5. Nails on top lifts should be hammered not to slip

a048e7cf57ae40176c22ff02aa93f9ea.jpg
8989783371678034b14543223a2fa0d3.jpg

Edited by VegTan - 7/4/13 at 8:39pm
post #6087 of 12426
informative post as always, and thanks for the link! My chrome's google translator made reading easy. thumbs-up.gif
post #6088 of 12426
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

as chogal said most of the creases are at the right place !! there are creases at the top of the vamp(at the first  shoelace line) witch most of the time apear when the shoe is  too small or the leather  is too thik(or unflexible)!nothing to worry about ecxept the cosmetic issue! i think when you buy shoes over 250-300(calf skin carmina price is 325-340) euro you have to buy shoe trees(wooden) at the same time!!

 

i think  putting shoetrees in them with some renovateur and after some dubbin at the vamp area(leave it about 2 days before buff) will make the creases a lot smouther!!!always put shoe trees after wearing them!!espeacially after an allday wear where your shoes are wet from sweat!!(if they dry without shoe trees creases are more noticeable)

 

You always give great advice, benhour. 

 

I put shoe trees in them right after I took the pictures, just wanted to give an understanding of what they looked like smile.gif


Now it's off to find some Dubbin. Does anyone know where I can pick some up in Toronto?

post #6089 of 12426

Leatherfoot in Yorkville I think  carries it

 

http://www.leatherfoot.com

post #6090 of 12426

Perfect! I live/work right near it. It didn't show up on their website, though.


Anyways, I'll take a look on my lunchbreak.  

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