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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 378

post #5656 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

But I feel the cleaner is absorbed by the leather, and using just a damp rag afterwards only removes the top layer of the soap, not what has been absorbed. However, I feel that light brushing while wetting the leather removes every bit of dirt and soap. Nevertheless, water is still not good for the leather, and I'm quite certain I strain it more than I should with my method.

Unless you are trying to strip off a substantial amount of old polish why use any product for cleaning? A good brushing and sometimes a damp rag is usually all that is required. Sure if they are exceptionally dirty or stained a cleaner might be required, but if you maintain them that should be a rarity.
post #5657 of 12469
Of course, this is something done after maybe two years or with boots used in pretty bad conditions, not monthly to my black oxfords.
post #5658 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

Of course, this is something done after maybe two years or with boots used in pretty bad conditions, not monthly to my black oxfords.

A bit of soap and water every 2 years is hardly something to be overly concerned with then.
post #5659 of 12469
Well, that is fully understandable, but if it's an unnecessary amount of cleaning I could use soap and a damp rag instead.
post #5660 of 12469
Street shoes ,cordovan and calf, are given a wipe down with a slightly damp cloth and brush /buffed every wearing . I rarely see a need for cleaning as this keeps polish build up to a minimum and allows the leather to attain its own patina . Work boots are another creature altogether
Quick question glenjay dont you find the lexol cleaner to be juust a liquified form of saddle soap ? I'm in the honeymoon phase of a love affair with the lexol conditioner as Im really impressed with the way it rejuvenated old shell but the cleaner meh not so much
post #5661 of 12469
In all my time I have never cleaned a pair of shoes. Reno or Lexol conditioner is enough to get rid of any dirt, or booze or anything.
post #5662 of 12469

Just to add to the pool of information and in my search for turpentine free products, I wrote to Collonil. They told me that I should 'not use any wax polish or dubbin as they all contain turpentine substitutes.' I'm not sure that, if you are allergic to turpentine you will automatically be allergic to turpentine substitutes but that's what they say. Like Benhour, they also recommend their 1909 Creme de Luxe, which they say is 'water based...with cedar oil'. I note that the Creme de Luxe comes in a range of colours. It sounds as though it would be impossible to find a non-turpentine wax polish

 

I think my non turpentine (for health and no other reason) shoe box will now contain just Saphir Renovateur and Collonil 1909 Creme de Luxe. Thanks, again for lots of help from those on this site. 

post #5663 of 12469

the only time i used soap to clean shoes were on a 8years old shoe and after i stepped in hole of mud!!! i think using  a cleaner conditioner it's enough  before polishing(as englade already mentioned)!! on the other hand if you leave in a country were salt is used in the streets(here they use it about 1-2 weeks the whole year  and that only in a few places) probably you have to take some more drastic  measures!!

 

Munky what polish you used at the past? hope you ll be ok with renovateur and the 1909 creams

post #5664 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Just to add to the pool of information and in my search for turpentine free products, I wrote to Collonil. They told me that I should 'not use any wax polish or dubbin as they all contain turpentine substitutes.' I'm not sure that, if you are allergic to turpentine you will automatically be allergic to turpentine substitutes but that's what they say. Like Benhour, they also recommend their 1909 Creme de Luxe, which they say is 'water based...with cedar oil'. I note that the Creme de Luxe comes in a range of colours. It sounds as though it would be impossible to find a non-turpentine wax polish

I think my non turpentine (for health and no other reason) shoe box will now contain just Saphir Renovateur and Collonil 1909 Creme de Luxe. Thanks, again for lots of help from those on this site. 

Why not just use meltonian shoe creams?
post #5665 of 12469

Ben, before I used Saphir products I used ones made by Woly. I have just found an old jar of Woly cream and I am pretty certain it doesn't contain turpentine. It smells of coconut. It may account for why did not have any symptoms when I used the Woly cream. 

 

Patrick, yes I could use Meltonian - although it is not so widely available in the UK.

 

I have just ordered a jar of the Collonil super de luxe creme, so I will use that up before making any further changes. I might use up the Woly cream as well. Thanks to you both for your help.

post #5666 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Ben, before I used Saphir products I used ones made by Woly. I have just found an old jar of Woly cream and I am pretty certain it doesn't contain turpentine. It smells of coconut. It may account for why did not have any symptoms when I used the Woly cream. 

 

Patrick, yes I could use Meltonian - although it is not so widely available in the UK.

 

I have just ordered a jar of the Collonil super de luxe creme, so I will use that up before making any further changes. I might use up the Woly cream as well. Thanks to you both for your help.

i am really happy i helped !! because for me health is  above these things!!

btw i use the Woly dubbin!! it have not any turpentine smell at all and at my opinion is one of the best dubbin out there!(mostly i use it on the vamp area and were a shoe flex)

post #5667 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

I am not fond of using saddle soap on leather shoes. I wrote a few paragraphs about why I feel this way earlier in this thread (http://www.styleforum.net/t/228153/the-official-shoe-care-thread-tutorials-photos-etc/4335#post_6223935). I would use the cleaner/conditioner however.

Your shoes should need to be cleaned with a cleaner much less often than you polish them. In my opinion you should add polish to your shoes after about every three to six wears, but always brush before and after wearing.

Cleaner/conditioner is typically rubbed onto the shoe thoroughly, wait for a short period of time, then brush the shoe with a shoe brush vigorously. (When using conditioner alone, shoes should be allowed to sit over night before polishing.)

Cleaning should be done when the shoes have collected and retained external pollutants (like salt, smoke, dirty water, scotch and soda, urine, air pollutants (carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide) and so on. Some of these are obvious on the shoe, other just look like a dull film. You can usually tell If shoes looks dirty, so clean them then. Cleaning shoes just for the sake of the process is a waste of time and cleaner (not that I haven't done that).
Thanks for the response, it was that in part your post that lead me to ask my question.
For further clarification.You pointed out that in theory, saddle soap's oils would balance out the sulfides and lubricate the shoes, and is probably safe to use on thicker leather (like that of the McTavish). Also, that it would be a quicker and cheaper way to keep shoes clean. I would like to know, if you where to use C/C anyways, would you not get the cleaning and lubricating effect anyways?
AE recomends using first C/C and then SS. Is it necessary to use the SS? And what did you mean by quick and cheap?

Another question, AE doesn't say to use polish on McTav's. I have a black pair, and it has contrast stitching, should I be using any polish?
post #5668 of 12469
I can't think of a situation where saddle soap, or heavy cleaning would ever be needed on shoes. Like Ben said he submerged his shoe in mud. Even then anything more than water and conditioning seems insane. Remember saddle soap was developed to clean bridle leather, which is completely different than calfskin used on shoes.
post #5669 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I can't think of a situation where saddle soap, or heavy cleaning would ever be needed on shoes. Like Ben said he submerged his shoe in mud. Even then anything more than water and conditioning seems insane. Remember saddle soap was developed to clean bridle leather, which is completely different than calfskin used on shoes.

 

However, the shoes in the OP's question are made of wax infused cowhide, much heavier than calfskin (just pointing that out, not saying that saddle soap is the best product for him to use).  

post #5670 of 12469
Quote:
Originally Posted by jd13jd13 View Post


Thanks for the response, it was that in part your post that lead me to ask my question.
For further clarification.You pointed out that in theory, saddle soap's oils would balance out the sulfides and lubricate the shoes, and is probably safe to use on thicker leather (like that of the McTavish). Also, that it would be a quicker and cheaper way to keep shoes clean. I would like to know, if you where to use C/C anyways, would you not get the cleaning and lubricating effect anyways?
AE recomends using first C/C and then SS. Is it necessary to use the SS? And what did you mean by quick and cheap?

Another question, AE doesn't say to use polish on McTav's. I have a black pair, and it has contrast stitching, should I be using any polish?

 

That part of their recommendation confuses me as well.  It sure doesn't seem like both products would be warranted.  I wonder who comes up with some of these care regimens that they publish on their website?  I'm not sure about their Black McTavish, but I know that the Natural and Cognac McTavishes are made from Horween Dublin.  I wonder if it is Horween that is recommending this care method, or just some AE "in-house" leather care specialist?

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