or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 354

post #5296 of 11406
Don't think the toe will crack that fast but yes they have already cracked beyond fixing. However it could still be worn, no problem at all. That's character.
post #5297 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by aglose View Post

maybe this question would be better served in the quick question forum but I'll start here to get the best advice. I have a pair of Chaps(I know not SF approved) tassel loafers that today I noticed are looking slightly worse for wear. what would you recommend to fix these up? and I would prefer to have a recommendation of kiwi polish over saphir but if saphir is what they need then I guess they will get saphir.

Hard to offer advice without an image to go from (not sure what worse for wear means to you), but in general I would say give the shoes a rub down with some Lexol leather cleaner, then apply a couple of coats of colored cream polish (whatever brand you like). Brush vigorously.

If the tassels are flaring, soak them in some Lexol leather conditioner, wrap a rubber band around each toward the end, and let dry overnight.

The Lexol products are pretty inexpensive, and you can pick them up at most shoe repair shops in the US.
post #5298 of 11406
I'll snap a picture tomorrow, thanks for the advice I'll have to find some lexol around town here.
post #5299 of 11406

Hi, I got theses Cheaney shoes. Any tips how to handle the cracks?

 

 

 

 

post #5300 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by englade321 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Bum View Post

Interesting,so shoe shiners are the only employers I know where they prefer less business and less business is better. Must be nice.

This gentlemans company is in the business of re- crafting shoes his post is in re sponse to another forum members statement that people mailed their shoes to him to be shined . If I am mistaken I stand corrected

No, you are not mistaken.  Nick (with B Nelson Shoes) spoke with me on the phone several weeks ago to offer a Saphir Shoe Shine to those in NYC at a cost of $7 per pair.  He also said he offers the Saphir products for sale at his store.  In the conversation I mentioned another fast growing company which has opened up shoe shine stands nationwide and offers mail-in mail-back options (which is what Nordstroms offers also) - and in the conversation Nick also echoed he had many international customers who mailed in their shoes to his store.  Apparently, based on his recent comments, his primary business is recrafting and not shining.  If so, then it is my mistake for mentioning his store as an additional option for others to mail (or drop off) shoes for shining for routine maintenance.  

 

"A Shine and Company" does offer the mail-in mail-out option, and I spoke to one of the owners (Rachel Lemey) about the same time I spoke to Nick.  Rachel was very encouraged to make it known they are willing and able to offer this service.  Their primary business is shines, and after starting in San Francisco - the have now opened up in many other cities and airports across the country.  Mike Rowe did a great news story on their techniques and products.

 

And as Nick mentioned, he has had domestic staff stop by his store with many shoes to be shined and maintained - but prefers not to tie up his recrafting staff for shines.  That is the difference - knowing what your primary business is.  In my opinion, offering maintenance and excellent shines could very well mead to recrafting down the line.  That is one reason why Nordstroms offers $2.50 shoe shines to customers who would then purchase other products and services in their store.  Cross-selling can be good - but it has to be organized and well managed to avoid pollution of the company's chief aim and mission.

post #5301 of 11406

I recently picked up a pair of Aldeburgh tan brogues from Oliver Sweeney (http://www.oliversweeney.com/shoes-and-boots/goodyear-welted/info/aldeburgh-tan/aldepatan.htmlthat I have yet to care for except for brushing/using trees. I've been trying to read up on what kind of products I should use to care for and maintain their quality in the foreseeable future but I'm having trouble sifting through the massive amount of information out there.

 

If I am only looking to maintain my shoes, and wish to be weary of discolouring the shade of tan they came in (the reason I bought them), what kind of polish/créme should I get? I was going to go for a neutral tone but after doing some reading it seems as if neutral polishes were advised against. 

 

Can SF excuse my ignorance and help me out? 

post #5302 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by GMMcL View Post

Gents:

I bought these Santonis secondhand today. They're generally in good repair except for the scuffs/gouge to the left toe. Is this repairable in a way that they will ever look decent? I have a few days left to return them, if necessary.

Keep in mind, I do like my shoes to look nice, but I'm not a stickler for a high spit shine, which I realize these shoes will never fully take given that gouge.

photo IMG_2545_zps46a6abc1.jpg
photo IMG_2548_zpsbd565070.jpg
photo IMG_2547_zpsaca70ee4.jpg
photo IMG_2549_zps6ee556e9.jpg

More than decent, that's an easy fix and they have tons more life left in them.

There is no cracking of the leather to worry about...what you see is simply the spray antiquing finish lifting off. Eliminate it with any preferred deglazer and you'll be ready to start again rebuilding a finish. As for the small tear, you can either simply pick it up and cut it off and fill the void with a little melted wax (if you really want it redone top notch take the shoes to your best local shoe repair...we distribute a product called filling wax to repair shops (numerous other companies the same) which is not available in consumer packaging - only to repairers - and they will know exactly what to do) and it will eventually fill, or you can attempt to pull it back, drop a little all-purpose cement (there are special glues, but even gorilla glue will from a home store will do) and lay it back down and cover it during your refinishing. Other than that, the shoes look to be in great shape...a little elbow grease and the right products should fix them right up.
post #5303 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shoefish8 View Post

I recently picked up a pair of Aldeburgh tan brogues from Oliver Sweeney (http://www.oliversweeney.com/shoes-and-boots/goodyear-welted/info/aldeburgh-tan/aldepatan.html
that I have yet to care for except for brushing/using trees. I've been trying to read up on what kind of products I should use to care for and maintain their quality in the foreseeable future but I'm having trouble sifting through the massive amount of information out there.


If I am only looking to maintain my shoes, and wish to be weary of discolouring the shade of tan they came in (the reason I bought them), what kind of polish/créme should I get? I was going to go for a neutral tone but after doing some reading it seems as if neutral polishes were advised against. 

Can SF excuse my ignorance and help me out? 

British Tan cream, Neutral wax......done. Although rarely do shoes in that color stay that way over their entire life....assuming they get worn. The elements will darken them up some no matter how hard you try.
post #5304 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post


British Tan cream, Neutral wax......done. Although rarely do shoes in that color stay that way over their entire life....assuming they get worn. The elements will darken them up some no matter how hard you try.

Thanks for the help! Is British Tan cream a brand product or are you describing generic products from Britain? I tried checking what kind of leather the shoes are made of but their site claims it is "pass leather" which I can't even find a definition for on google. What is the actual disadvantage of using a neutral cream as well as neutral wax? 

 

By cream I assume that includes Meltonian etc, but not kiwi/saphire which I understand are wax based polishes?

post #5305 of 11406
Here are the pics of the loafers I was talking about earlier. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


post #5306 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Copeland View Post

Yes, we do have some uppity wannabes, and their character is measured by how easily they get upset over someone else's choice to pay for any service rendered.

We have many classes within the USA, not just two or three.  Folks don't need to have exceptional wealth to afford domestic staff.  They just need to be able to afford it.  My father, before retiring as a very high US Air Force officer, made sure my mother, brother, and I were looked after while he was at war.  If there was a domestic specialty that needed attending to, and the staff was not qualified to perform the needed task - then it was outsourced to a professional.  This was before UPS and a global economy.

Anyone owning dozens of high quality shoes and earning more income per hour which exceeds $3, $7, $10, or even $25, plus insured trackable carrier fees -  who desires to maintain their best look - may choose to have an outside source keep their shoes in excellent condition.  Those who complain about it, whine, grind their teeth, spit, sputter, and use their privilege of commentary - only reveal themselves to be of a class not worth mentorship - unless they are opting for the talk-radio character.
You really are a spectacular rocket! I'm also intrigued as to how someone who's father was in the US military writes like they learned English as an additional language around the same time they started posting on SF
post #5307 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

More than decent, that's an easy fix and they have tons more life left in them.

There is no cracking of the leather to worry about...what you see is simply the spray antiquing finish lifting off. Eliminate it with any preferred deglazer and you'll be ready to start again rebuilding a finish. As for the small tear, you can either simply pick it up and cut it off and fill the void with a little melted wax (if you really want it redone top notch take the shoes to your best local shoe repair...we distribute a product called filling wax to repair shops (numerous other companies the same) which is not available in consumer packaging - only to repairers - and they will know exactly what to do) and it will eventually fill, or you can attempt to pull it back, drop a little all-purpose cement (there are special glues, but even gorilla glue will from a home store will do) and lay it back down and cover it during your refinishing. Other than that, the shoes look to be in great shape...a little elbow grease and the right products should fix them right up.

Well I will certainly defer to the guy with years of refinishing experience.

I am surprised that you would mention gorilla glue as an option however. I normally recommend barge cement if there is a flap large enough to put a dab of glue under. I like the rubber cement characteristics of barge cement, and it seems to be a common item carried by shoe repair shops. In my experience using gorilla glue (on things other than shoes) it expands considerable in all directions as it dries to a hard state. On the gorilla glue bottle itself it states that the glue will expand 3 to 4 times. I would think this would cause a lump under the leather that was being repaired.
post #5308 of 11406
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

Well I will certainly defer to the guy with years of refinishing experience.

I am surprised that you would mention gorilla glue as an option however. I normally recommend barge cement if there is a flap large enough to put a dab of glue under. I like the rubber cement characteristics of barge cement, and it seems to be a common item carried by shoe repair shops. In my experience using gorilla glue (on things other than shoes) it expands considerable in all directions as it dries to a hard state. On the gorilla glue bottle itself it states that the glue will expand 3 to 4 times. I would think this would cause a lump under the leather that was being repaired.

Noteh multi isn't working on my phone so I will just respond to this one.

Thanks for the good news and great advice! Hugely relieved. They're exactly what I've been looking for, and they were pretty cheap, by the standards of my area (the thrift threaders avoid quoting prices, but suffice it to say these cost me less than a $20 bill). So with maybe another $10 investment plus time, I've finally got myself a really nice, antiques looking modern lasted pair of cap toe oxfords, one of the harder "staple" shoes to find!
post #5309 of 11406

Whoops...wrong thread....

post #5310 of 11406

Lard plus some cedar wood oil is all what was needed. Maybe some beeswax into the mixture. Heat and stir well.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**