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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 35

post #511 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

If they are already oiled they are probably pretty water resistant as it is. Some renovateur would be good now and again with some buffing, but if they get really wet, make sure they have trees in them and they are left to dry naturally for a few days. Re-apply reno at this point. IT wouldn't hurt to use Obaneuf's LP lightly every few months. If you put a light coat of this stuff on them and rub it in good then let it dry 24 hours and buff, a subtle glow will appear. You can reno over that in between LP applications. That is what I do for bad weather boots. Seems to work well.

Thanks.
post #512 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Moo View Post

What is the word on Neutral colored Saphir Medaille D'or for use on Navy calf? I know neutral paste/wax/creme is not recommended for shell, but what about for off-color shoes in calf (navy, green, etc.)?

I am pretty sure Saphir makes a navy wax. I would say neutral is ok, but use sparingly on the vamp because I have experienced this whitish buildup in the creases and such that is more apparent with neurtal than a colored wax. Same goes for neutral cream.
post #513 of 9001
I'm having trouble with some of my shoes looking "dry" behind where the shined part of the shoe, e.g., cap toe, tip of the shoe, how can I combat this?
post #514 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston S. View Post

I'm having trouble with some of my shoes looking "dry" behind where the shined part of the shoe, e.g., cap toe, tip of the shoe, how can I combat this?

Get some of that wax buildup warm then condition, let dry recondition and polish once they're not looking thirsty anymore. I use Lexol.
post #515 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I am pretty sure Saphir makes a navy wax. I would say neutral is ok, but use sparingly on the vamp because I have experienced this whitish buildup in the creases and such that is more apparent with neurtal than a colored wax. Same goes for neutral cream.

I agree that neutral can build up and make the color look 'murky'. The Saphir neutral wax is more transparent than the plain old Kiwi neutral for what it is worth.

But since your new navy shoes have PURPLE stitching I would definitely start with nothing but neutral and renovateur and see how it goes. As the navy creme or wax will definitely start to color the purple stitching navy.
Edited by Gdot - 11/17/11 at 8:57am
post #516 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by NORE View Post

Get some of that wax buildup warm then condition, let dry recondition and polish once they're not looking thirsty anymore. I use Lexol.

When you say condition, you mean with reno or leather conditioner right? And as for the final step you still suggest polishing on the creases?
post #517 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston S. View Post

When you say condition, you mean with reno or leather conditioner right? And as for the final step you still suggest polishing on the creases?

Pictures would help. If it is wax build-up getting some meltonian color preparer, or angelus deglazer and a cotton rag to remove layers of old caked on polish works well. Then condition using either Lexol conditioner, or Reno and then rebuild a couple of thin layers of polish between letting it dry and buffing.
post #518 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by Winston S. View Post

When you say condition, you mean with reno or leather conditioner right? And as for the final step you still suggest polishing on the creases?

Yes, I use Lexol. Polish the creases with cream polish, not wax.
post #519 of 9001
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post #520 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Pictures would help. If it is wax build-up getting some meltonian color preparer, or angelus deglazer and a cotton rag to remove layers of old caked on polish works well. Then condition using either Lexol conditioner, or Reno and then rebuild a couple of thin layers of polish between letting it dry and buffing.

Alternatively and in my experience using Saphir Renomat is the best option.

I have a pair of Santoni wholecuts that used to be very thirsty and need regular creaming. Since I also like a wax shine, they inevitably began to get a wax build up. To break this vicious circle I first used Renomat to remove and deep clean old layers of polish, followed by Renovateur, then cream, then a final wax coat. Indeed this is the sequence as recommended by Saphir themselves and it worked brilliantly on my Santoni's.

Discovering Renomat was just as good as discovering Renovateur!
post #521 of 9001
Something that has been annoying me for a while now is that although I can pull of a decent glaze I get minute scratches on my shoes when I spit polish.

Although everything looks fine from a distance.....(click images to supersize)
475


.....you can see the tiny 'scratches' (in a circular shape) around the brightest reflection.
Does anyone know how to get a glaze without these 'scratches'? Use a softer cloth or a different wax? Press less hard whilst polishing?
Maybe I'm just being too fussy about all of this though.

383
post #522 of 9001
Try a micro fiber polishing cloth and/or lighter pressure.

Alternatively there are great medications out there for OCD. biggrin.gif Just kidding.
post #523 of 9001
Tried that, heating my wax au bain-marie, polishing with a blow drier aimed at the shoe (in various heat modes at various distances) as well as a combination of before mentioned methods.
I might have to opt for option B. lol8[1].gif
post #524 of 9001
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I do the same thing, but with my balls.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian B View Post

I use something a lot more sensetive, this way I actually can feel the irregularities in the leather. teacha.gif

They say that a picture paints a thousand words. In this instance, I beg you both NOT to paint that picture. uhoh.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naka View Post

After weeks and weeks of working on them every other day or so, my boots are finally starting to take a candy-coat shine.

You might find with RM's, that while the toecaps sparkle, the area to the rear appears a little dry by comparison only. Coming along nicely.
post #525 of 9001
Can anyone comment on SHS's post about using an oil to care for your soles?
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