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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 305

post #4561 of 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzzyJones View Post

Hahaaaa! Wear flip flops and put a shine on your toes! That'll learn em! I love to bull my shoes but then walk funny as I'm scared to scuff the finish. Its very sad

I'm wearing flip flops today on my day off! I hear you though. I shine them and literally within 2 hours they get scuffed.
post #4562 of 10687
Got some pretty terrible stains on a pair of shoes. Unknown origin, possibly water, beer or wine, a combination or something else entirely.

How do I even start removing them? Renovateur? Or just go straight to polishing with cream, then wax? Vinegar and water?
post #4563 of 10687
Thanks EnsitMike, Chogall, englade321 and Northampton Novice. Great info. I'd rather not rely on my cobbler for cosmetic maintenance. The few local ones are quite clumsy, and travelling miles just to have this done is tiresome.

Can't remember where I heard: ill informed amateur attempts at sanding/smoothing/dressing the edges can leave them insufficiently protected, and likely to soak up rain water. Professional burnishing with hard wax supposedly results in a bullet proof edge. Any thought on this?

Thanks for the kind offer Northampton Novice. I'd rather you put 100% into your exams, then charge me exorbitant rates to advise and fix smile.gif

Lear

Edit: We need DWF11 to add his wisdom
post #4564 of 10687
A clear and helpful video for novices, from John Lobb

post #4565 of 10687
@mediahound & @AlexSF: something quite therapeutic about watching these videos. I wonder at what point in his 30 year career, he decided to swap the brush/cloth applicator for rubber encased fingers.

On the other hand, the Japanese make it look like a religious ritual. Can't believe how smartly dressed this bloke is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=CT1NN5qCF7U&feature=endscreen

Lear
Edited by Lear - 4/16/13 at 2:12pm
post #4566 of 10687

Hello shoe care aficionados.

 

I have this pair of shoes from Brooks Brothers.

 

 

 

 

 

How do I care for these shoes properly? They came from the manufacturer with a heavy shine that I don't  want to lose. At the same time, I don't want the leather to dry out or form any more creases than it needs to.

 

The box describes them as "dark brown boned calf." 

 

I bought some Saphir Renovateur, and Saphir Medaille D'or 1925 in Dark Brown. But before applying I wanted to know whether it would take the shine off of them. 

post #4567 of 10687

Is there a difference between horsehair shoe brush brands? I have a cheap Star brand one now and am wondering if it would be worth investing in a Saphir or Abbeyhorn brand one? Or, are they pretty much all the same?

post #4568 of 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lear View Post

@mediahound & @AlexSF: something quite therapeutic about watching these videos. I wonder at what point in his 30 year career, he decided to swap the brush/cloth applicator for rubber encased fingers.

On the other hand, the Japanese make it look like a religious ritual. Can't believe how smartly dressed this bloke is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=CT1NN5qCF7U&feature=endscreen

Lear

 

Agreed. And then this guy says you are a wimp if you use gloves and don't apply the polish with your bare hands. Also sorta fun to watch:

 

 

post #4569 of 10687
Did I just see a man set the shoes of another alight, while he was still wearing them, in the litigious USA, where reside the worst of flesh eating lawyers?

Great video though. Must be a frustrated percussionist. Sure I heard a paradiddle or two during the twin brush routine.

Lear
post #4570 of 10687

Sorry, I actually meant to post this one:

 

post #4571 of 10687
^I see your best shoe shine and raise you the best shoe repair:



(X-post from funny picture thread)
post #4572 of 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnsitMike View Post

I ended up taking that advice, thank benhour


 

Sweet Pics (Click to show)

 

Also, thank you everyone.  After finding this site 2 weeks ago, I've learned much about the craft of shoe shine and even patina, and it all started after finding a jar of Meltonian polish in the closet.  Maybe not directly, but many of you have posted valuable information in the past that has created a database of knowledge for the inquiring mind.  I finished my first pair today, and am beyond pleased as a first run, and learned it all right here. So thanks again and I owe you all a beer.  Haha, cheers. 

cheers.gif

 

 

 

Nice Job, Mike

post #4573 of 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnsitMike View Post

Here is a pair I just finished.  The pants are actually an oxblood color, so you can imagine the shoes are equally more warm in tone.
 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


 

 

Mike, how are you applying the leather dye? I am interested in doing some testing with dye patina. I actually e-bay'd some burgundy PA's that I thought would be my "test" shoes but after stripping all the caked on wax, I conditioned and polished and they looked too nice to experiment on.

 

I'm wondering, specifically, if you are thining the dye with anything (solvent, spirits, etc.)?

Then, how do you go about the gradient blending of colors with the dye?

post #4574 of 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by cdmcallister View Post

Mike, how are you applying the leather dye? I am interested in doing some testing with dye patina. I actually e-bay'd some burgundy PA's that I thought would be my "test" shoes but after stripping all the caked on wax, I conditioned and polished and they looked too nice to experiment on.

 

I'm wondering, specifically, if you are thining the dye with anything (solvent, spirits, etc.)?

Then, how do you go about the gradient blending of colors with the dye?


I use several different methods.  I start out with a paint brush, then I move to a dauber, and I finish off with folded cotton swaps and buff in between each application.  I did not thin the dye on these two, although I will in the future because I can see it making life just a little easier.  If you don't thin, you have to be precise.  Every brush, every rub, every swipe has to be purposeful because the dye sets in heavily.  Once I get good I can see it being a huge time saver however.

Blending is done by feel.  If you have a background in fine art or design it will come very easily.  It is a lot like oil on canvas or rendering with markers on paper.  If not, just practice.  It is really just a perception acuity, or in other words, if you pay close attention to the properties of your materials, and just note how it reacts to different methods, you'll be a pro in no time.  The reason there are masters that are surrounded by mysticism is only because this honed acuity is hard to communicate, but definitely not hard to learn.

That said, our ability of mastery is supposed to happen somewhere around 10,000 hours haha.
 

post #4575 of 10687
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnsitMike View Post


I use several different methods.  I start out with a paint brush, then I move to a dauber, and I finish off with folded cotton swaps and buff in between each application.  I did not thin the dye on these two, although I will in the future because I can see it making life just a little easier.  If you don't thin, you have to be precise.  Every brush, every rub, every swipe has to be purposeful because the dye sets in heavily.  Once I get good I can see it being a huge time saver however.


Blending is done by feel.  If you have a background in fine art or design it will come very easily.  It is a lot like oil on canvas or rendering with markers on paper.  If not, just practice.  It is really just a perception acuity, or in other words, if you pay close attention to the properties of your materials, and just note how it reacts to different methods, you'll be a pro in no time.  The reason there are masters that are surrounded by mysticism is only because this honed acuity is hard to communicate, but definitely not hard to learn.


That said, our ability of mastery is supposed to happen somewhere around 10,000 hours haha.

 

Thanks for the great info.
I'll get back in the hunt for a thriftstore shoe with decent leather to practice on. What brand of dye do you find the best for this type of art?

So you've read Outliers I see, or at least subscribe to its 10,000 hour benchmark.
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