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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 257

post #3841 of 10232

So I got a pair of Alden Indys in brown chromexcel a couple months ago. Recently i discovered I had caused a tear where theres now a flap of leather by the heel. Any ideas on what I can do for this? normally if i just press it down, it stays flat against the rest of the leather and im not all too concerned about the cosmetics... I believe boots are made for wearing. I'm more concerned about the longevity and water resistance of the leather. It looks like i could just use a spot of glue and glue the sucker down but not sure what that will do in the long run. Any ideas would be appreciated!

 

 

post #3842 of 10232
You are right; thats the way to fix it.
Dip the tip of a needle into some decent glue so that just a small drop clings to the needle.
Smear the drop out over the rough side that is hanging loose.
Depending on the type of glue, wait a minute before pressing the parts together.

-edit-
I fixes these Corthays up the same way and they are holding up nicely.

post #3843 of 10232

If you did get driving shoes, think of them more as slippers than shoes. They are not made for any significant amount of walking around outdoors. The very light construction is for gentle interior use. Or working the pedals of a car, but not for using like regular shoes.

 

If you like that thin, flexible feel, consider traditional boat shoes. They will be almost as comfortable sitting down, and can take much heavier use.

post #3844 of 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by upintheair View Post

So I got a pair of Alden Indys in brown chromexcel a couple months ago. Recently i discovered I had caused a tear where theres now a flap of leather by the heel. Any ideas on what I can do for this? normally if i just press it down, it stays flat against the rest of the leather and im not all too concerned about the cosmetics... I believe boots are made for wearing. I'm more concerned about the longevity and water resistance of the leather. It looks like i could just use a spot of glue and glue the sucker down but not sure what that will do in the long run. Any ideas would be appreciated! Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)









I would definitely glue the flap down. And, I would suggest using Barge Cement (a type of rubber cement) rather than an acrylic glue like super glue. The barge cement will flex with the leather better, and it will not break down as badly over time as an acrylic glue will when exposed to the elements.
post #3845 of 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xancatrius View Post

Hi guys, just a 17 year old kiddo who would like to form an appreciation for the finer things in life, shoe shining and polishing included.

2 very honest questions, I hope you guys would be kind enough to oblige me on this.

1 : For a complete average joe with no knowledge of shoe shining whatsoever, could anybody provide the steps as to shining of shoes? I've read about 20 pages of this thread and heard terms like buff polish and wax being thrown about but I have no idea what they are. I'm not looking to antique or mirror polish my shoes, just would like to know how to polish my shoes such that the creasing is minimized, the leather maintains healthy and there is just a nice shine to it.

2. I just recently purchased a pair of dark brown Bottega loafers. Luck had it that I would be caught in a torrential downpour. The shoes seemed fine at first but recently I have noticed stressing on certain parts of the loafer, "wrinkles" would be the word that comes to mind. Any idea how to restore the leather? Also, due to the loafers having no actual sole attached to the upper, just rubber sticking out at the bottom, the rest being leather, the bottom front part actually got discolored and slightly scratched due to friction I think. Based on my very shallow understanding, would wax polish be able to cover it up? And also, is there a different way as to polish such loafers as opposed to normal dress shoes?

Any input would be greatly appreciated. Much thanks in advance.

I recommend reading this post by Ron Rider
post #3846 of 10232
4hBxK7X.jpg

CTeKgv7.jpg


Time for a wash

KPt1irW.jpg

Shampoo:water about 1:10.

First, I brushed the shoes to get rid of any loose dirt and dust, then I wetted them under the running tap (lukewarm water):

lDS8zZF.jpg

... and soaped with the yellow side of the sponge:

yNpCbk7.jpg

After that a quick rinse, soaped again and a thorough rinse; laces in bath:

RTtoaFT.jpg


Cleaned the soles as well, in the end:

fVL8QVD.jpg


After the last rinse, I dried the shoes with a clean towel. Then I put newspapers in them, and now I have to wait for them to dry
(at least a day, I think). When they're dry: brush and spray.

uI2Dlz5.jpg
post #3847 of 10232

Just did this with my shoes, they are now drying post-spray. However it seems that my nap on the toes and in other areas is quite damage. I dont' know whether to attribute this to problems in the washing, a couple years of neglect, or the fact that the sued multipurpose brush I bought from a local shop had brass bristles which seemed to hurt the nap =(.

post #3848 of 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

4hBxK7X.jpg

CTeKgv7.jpg


Time for a wash

KPt1irW.jpg

Shampoo:water about 1:10.

First, I brushed the shoes to get rid of any loose dirt and dust, then I wetted them under the running tap (lukewarm water):

lDS8zZF.jpg

... and soaped with the yellow side of the sponge:

yNpCbk7.jpg

After that a quick rinse, soaped again and a thorough rinse; laces in bath:

RTtoaFT.jpg


Cleaned the soles as well, in the end:

fVL8QVD.jpg


After the last rinse, I dried the shoes with a clean towel. Then I put newspapers in them, and now I have to wait for them to dry
(at least a day, I think). When they're dry: brush and spray.

uI2Dlz5.jpg

 

Very nice.  I've always found it interesting that shoes are "somehow" able to be cleaned this deeply using running water, etc., and yet some people act like their shoes will melt like the Wicked Witch of the West if they get caught in a spring thunderstorm.  Please post pictures after they are dry!

post #3849 of 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheloniusDrunk View Post

Just did this with my shoes, they are now drying post-spray. However it seems that my nap on the toes and in other areas is quite damage. I dont' know whether to attribute this to problems in the washing, a couple years of neglect, or the fact that the sued multipurpose brush I bought from a local shop had brass bristles which seemed to hurt the nap =(.

I don't think that's a result of the washing. I've washed suede shoes before and have had no problems with the nap. So, I'd say it's the years of neglect (wear) or the brush... I always use a regular shoe brush (see last pic) for my suede shoes. I don't like crèpe brushes and have never used brass.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

Very nice.  I've always found it interesting that shoes are "somehow" able to be cleaned this deeply using running water, etc., and yet some people act like their shoes will melt like the Wicked Witch of the West if they get caught in a spring thunderstorm.  Please post pictures after they are dry!

I don't get that either. Suede can handle some (or a lot of smile.gif) water. I will post pics when they're dry, brushed and sprayed.
post #3850 of 10232
After a couple of hours of drying and a light brush:

CAWMyXf.jpg
post #3851 of 10232
I had the courage to wash under running water only clarks desert boots.

You wasn't able to clean them with just the usual brush and gum cleaner?
Viewing first picture, they didn't need such restore.
post #3852 of 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOBD View Post

After a couple of hours of drying and a light brush:

CAWMyXf.jpg

 

Oh yeah, they look great!  

post #3853 of 10232
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexSF View Post

I had the courage to wash under running water only clarks desert boots.

You wasn't able to clean them with just the usual brush and gum cleaner?
Viewing first picture, they didn't need such restore.

Yes, that might have been enough. There were some dark stains on them though, because I thought the brush of the "shoe polish machine" in a hotel wouldn't hurt... Not a good idea. So I thought I'd give them some extra attention. smile.gif
post #3854 of 10232
SnowSeal day:

Alfred Sargent Fordham
Crockett & Jones Islay
Tricker's Stow

Untitled
post #3855 of 10232

Nice.  This is a collection one day I hope to achieve. 

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