or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 244

post #3646 of 11258
I've bought a pair of AE's in Walnut calf and they've lighter in the toebox than the rest of the shoe.

How can I darken them to match the rest of the shoe? I'm using Saphir #03 wax polish. Do I need to take them to a cobbler or can I blend in a darker brown polish like Saphir #10 Cognac to darken them?

HGq916i.jpg
post #3647 of 11258
Quote:
Originally Posted by bapelolol View Post

I'm using Saphir #03 wax polish.
]

From my understanding cream polish has more dye than wax so if you want it to develop a patina, cream might be the way to go. I figure cream would absorb into the leather whereas layers of wax just builds up from itself.
post #3648 of 11258
Hey Guys,

So i tried to strip down the old polish on my AE loafers w/ some lexol cleaner and this is what happened. Perhaps I rubbed too vigorously? It appears that the original color came off. What would you recommend to do at this point? just put a lot of shoe cream on and it? Thanks for your help

PS: has anyone else had similar experiences w/ lexol leather cleaner? now i'm afraid to use it on my other shoes..
Edited by jsong812 - 1/23/13 at 7:39pm
post #3649 of 11258
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsong812 View Post

Hey Guys,

So i tried to strip down the old polish on my AE loafers w/ some lexol cleaner and this is what happened. Perhaps I rubbed too vigorously? It appears that the original color came off. What would you recommend to do at this point? just put a lot of shoe cream on and it? Thanks for your help Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
PS: has anyone else had similar experiences w/ lexol leather cleaner? now i'm afraid to use it on my other shoes..

I have used Lexol leather cleaner for a lot of years and have never had a problem with it for general cleaning. If you really want to strip all the wax off of your shoes (in the future) I would suggest RenoMat, which does not require a lot of rubbing. The chemicals in RenoMat also tend to pull some of the oils out of the leather as well, so you will want to add some leather conditioner to the shoes after using the RenoMat.

I would use Lexol leather cleaner when you want to clean your shoes and remove a few layers of wax (use before you polish the shoes for the fourth time in a row, or so). I would only strip all the way down to the finish every year or two (depending on how often you add polish to your shoes).

The damage done does not look too major, and you should be able to hid it with shoe polish. If you did in fact remove some of the factory finish, that area will tend to absorb water and oil a little more than the surrounding area, so it might darken more in that area when you apply polish, but will lighten back up as the oil soaks deeper and the excess is wiped off (and the water - if any- evaporates).

In regard to which polish is better to use to cover damage, either cream or paste work fine for slightly different reasons. Cream typically have a higher pigment ratio than paste, mainly due to the inverse wax ratio. When you polish your shoes with colored shoe polish you are just putting colored wax over the leather, the color does not go into the leather itself. Therefore the more wax you have the more color you have (think of trying to look through a number of lightly tinted windows stacked back to back). Cream polish makes up for this by using a higher pigment concentration in the mix, since it has a lower wax ratio.
post #3650 of 11258
[IMG]

After wearing my R.M. Williams for one day in London in pretty bad weather rain/slush and I assume also salt I ended up with these lines on my shoes, they run almost the length of the shoe and looks like creases but obviously are not, could this has been cause by salt? And how would I get rid of it? I have cleaned then with normal water and used saphire renovateur to moisturise and clean but it hasn't managed to do anything. I know I can cover it with polish just wondering if anyone knew why it happened and how fix it? Thanks!
post #3651 of 11258
post #3652 of 11258
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Personally I bull all black cap toes calfs and for non black shoes I do a gradual bull at toe tip.

 

That's quite a departure for you, no? 

 

I recall you advocating using only renovateur and no wax.

post #3653 of 11258
I have used Meltonian leather balm , it's one quarter of the cost of Reno and works just as well. Reno way overpriced , overrated product or leather balm the opposite!
post #3654 of 11258
Anyone know what type of dressing/finish is used for soles (e.g., C&J) and where can this is picked up? I figure edge dressing can be used but the ones I've found are only black and brown; I am fairly interested in a lighter color like the tan of C&J:

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

Want to play around with some of the soles of my shoes. biggrin.gif
post #3655 of 11258
I'd almost recommend just trying some Saphir Dubbin. It would resaturate the leather and cause it to naturally darken without the need to apply any pigment.

If you wanted to apply pigmet, our Saphir Edge Dressing / Renovating repair cream comes in a light brown.

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

Reply

Saphir Shoe Polish  -  Shoe Shine Guides

Luxury Wooden Hangers & Hundreds of other Fantastic Men's Accessories

Reply
post #3656 of 11258

Shoe care noob here (and this is a very long thread to pick through unfortunately).  Can someone correct me if I'm wrong, but based on my research the general steps (and I know everyone has their preferred method) to polishing your shoes are:

 

1. Clean dirt & dust off; wipe with cloth and/or brush

2. Apply a leather conditioner. Let dry.

3. Apply a cream-base polish. Let dry.

4. Apply a wax-base polish mix with water

5. Repeat step 4 until desired shine

6. Buff

 

Questions:

1. I read a lot about saphir renovator.  This is neutral polish, right?  When does this come in play?

2. Whats the difference between step 6 buffing and say step 1 where you clean/prep the shoes from dirt/dust?  Aren't either purposes just brushing with horsehair brush and/or wiping with cloth?

 

I think I had some other questions, but blanking out at the moment.  Thanks for helping a noob out.

post #3657 of 11258
That pretty much summed up the steps, yes. I would advise you to read Hanger Project's guide on shoe shining to get better insight, I find it excellent.

As for your questions:
1) No, it's a cleaner and conditioner, more like neutral cream, but thinner IMO.
2) The difference is small, but I either use a brush with softer bristle or a microfiber glove to achieve more shine.
post #3658 of 11258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian B View Post

That pretty much summed up the steps, yes. I would advise you to read Hanger Project's guide on shoe shining to get better insight, I find it excellent.

As for your questions:
1) No, it's a cleaner and conditioner, more like neutral cream, but thinner IMO.
2) The difference is small, but I either use a brush with softer bristle or a microfiber glove to achieve more shine.


noted.  Thanks very much.

post #3659 of 11258

Christian B, president of this thread.

post #3660 of 11258
Haha, not at all, as one can see from this thread I'm no more than a caveman discovering the wheel with regards to some of the connoisseurs.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**