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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 236

post #3526 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lear View Post

Has anyone here experimented with 'brewing' their own polish? I've had another look at those Japanese tutorials, and the idea intrigues. However, they both appear to be inscrutably tight-lipped about their own brew. I doubt bribes, torture or blackmail would reveal anything.
It'll be fun trying to improve upon what I'm currently achieving. Any link would be helpful, as the ones I've found are all about economizing, not refining/improving. There'll be none of the mistakes I made when trying to construct an atomic device in the kitchen. Wow!... that really put my neighbourhood on the map. But enough of ruined neighbourhoods and lost lives. I realize It'll involve flammable solutions gently warmed over a stove, so safety will be paramount. They had to rebuild the last fire station... and move it further out of town.
You might ask, why go to the trouble? Perfectly valid question, and one I'm sure those two Japanese artisans could answer smile.gif
Lear
Edit:
Some theory:
http://www.lformula.com/index.php?part=him003&page=041
A recipe (at least something to study):
http://www.lformula.com/index.php?part=him003&page=044
A little history:
http://www.ancestryaid.co.uk/boards/family-history-genealogy-information/11774-shoe-polish.html
http://www.blancoandbull.com/boot-cleaning/boot-polish-history/
Some opinions on why you should polish
http://kaufmann-mercantile.com/shoe-shine/

Sorry to hear of your recent Nuclear mishap, these things happen when one is moving towards world domination. A few lost lives are to be expected.

As for your current endeavor, finding the eye of Newt is going to be your big problem.
post #3527 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lear View Post

Has anyone here experimented with 'brewing' their own polish? I've had another look at those Japanese tutorials, and the idea intrigues. However, they both appear to be inscrutably tight-lipped about their own brew. I doubt bribes, torture or blackmail would reveal anything.
It'll be fun trying to improve upon what I'm currently achieving. Any link would be helpful, as the ones I've found are all about economizing, not refining/improving. There'll be none of the mistakes I made when trying to construct an atomic device in the kitchen. Wow!... that really put my neighbourhood on the map. But enough of ruined neighbourhoods and lost lives. I realize It'll involve flammable solutions gently warmed over a stove, so safety will be paramount. They had to rebuild the last fire station... and move it further out of town.
You might ask, why go to the trouble? Perfectly valid question, and one I'm sure those two Japanese artisans could answer smile.gif
Lear
Edit:
Some theory:
http://www.lformula.com/index.php?part=him003&page=041
A recipe (at least something to study):
http://www.lformula.com/index.php?part=him003&page=044
A little history:
http://www.ancestryaid.co.uk/boards/family-history-genealogy-information/11774-shoe-polish.html
http://www.blancoandbull.com/boot-cleaning/boot-polish-history/
Some opinions on why you should polish
http://kaufmann-mercantile.com/shoe-shine/

Very interesting topic Lear!

I drink my share of microbrews (living in the Northwest), but I have never had an interest in being a home brewer. I'm always interested in the ingredients however.

The links you provided are quite interesting. It really shows the high ration of solvent to everything else in shoe polish. I was surprised at the limited sources for oil that were used.

Natural wax (plant and insect) inherently has an oil quality to it due to the oleic acid it contains. Japan Wax is mostly oil, not wax, and soap is high in oil (fat from cows in the case of Yellow Soap).

I was surprised that I didn't see more lanolin, mink, or neetsfoot in the mixtures. Just as a side note: The Saphir Renovateur that everyone loves (myself included) is mink oil based.
post #3528 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian B View Post

I read it all the time here on SF, people advising against using any cream etc. I may agree that I hyperbolized a bit.

It must be a question of interpretation, this thread frequently mentions & discusses the virtues of products like Venetian cream, Saphir Cordovan cream, Renovateur etc Furthermore there are a number of posts which reference using products other than creams, an example being the 'Mac Method' which encourages using wax polish every 10 -15 wears or so...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian B View Post

I fully agree on the overkill; I certainly won't use Obenauf's on my other shell cordovan pair (for now) the RL marlow, but I won't be as afraid of doing harm to them as I were before.
The reason I deceided to experiment on this was after seeing this thread; dry rot. I can only think what my pair has gone through whithout any treatment at all; daily use without shoe trees; dried by a heat source when soaked; stuffed full of wax; sitting in a box for years. To think that a pea sized amount of Renovateur is going to replace all oil lost during all these years, possbly decades, is naive IMO. Of course, I'm not at all an expert, but that's just my opinion.

Dry rot of Cordovan or indeed any leather is a valid concern but must be tempered with the likelihood of it occuring. Dry rot or more accurately the oxidation of leather can and does occur. Cordovan is less susceptible to this, due to it's unique collagen make up & high fat content (approx 30%) and would require extreme circumstances for it to occur.

However once the process begins, it is irreversible, so naively applying liberal quantaties of Obenauf's or Lexol or anything else isn't going to stop it. A pair of Cordovan shoes which have become oxidised will have very obvious signs, they will be brittle, show signs of cracking especially near stitching and will lack the lustre associated with Cordovan. If you end up with a pair in this condition it's better to put them back down.

However the reality for most Cordovan shoes even those which have suffered some neglect, is that they can be restored to their original glory with some old fashioned elbow grease. Sparing application of conditioners may benefit the shoes if they feel dry and It is best to apply no more than a pea sized amount of renovateur to shoes. When it comes to conditioning less is more. For as long as I can remember the natural oils within a deer bone have been sufficient in conditiong Cordovan, both by imparting and pushing back the bloom of Cordovan shoes.

Over conditioning of Cordovan is in my opinion the most reckless form of care and does shorten the lifespan of this fine material. Putting aside the aesthetic negatives which can ensue, adding liberal amounts of oils changes the shape and placement of the natural fibres within Cordovan, reducing it's tensile strength. But more ironically by increasing the already high fat content of Cordovan you also reduce it's ability to naturally wick moisture. Given how much the average foot perspires, you increase the likelihood of suffering from excess levels of moisture which can lead to rotting of the Cordovan.

I appreciate this was your experimental pair but to draw the inference and then strongly suggest that boot oil or Obenauf's HDLP should be used to condition vintage Cordavan is somewhat misguided IMO.
post #3529 of 10706
Thank you very much for your post, highly appreciate getting another point of view; really opened my eyes. I will surely take it for thought for later, and not treat my other shell cordovan the same way. So for people buying vintage shell cordovan, follow this guy's advice! However, I will keep on documenting on the effects the Obenauf's going to have on my Florsheims.
post #3530 of 10706

I had no problems getting lots of gloss out of my #8 boots, treated with SnoSeal (used ala Crane's method, similar to Obenauf's):

 

 

 

I still hold that most people over-think it when it comes to shoe care; it's pretty hard to mess up leather in my experience.

post #3531 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

I had no problems getting lots of gloss out of my #8 boots, treated with SnoSeal (used ala Crane's method, similar to Obenauf's):

 

Sno seal similar to obenaufs??? lol, wut?

 

If all you want is lots of gloss buy the cheapo liquid shoe polish dispensers with foam applicator, no need to over think it.

post #3532 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stirling View Post

 

Sno seal similar to obenaufs??? lol, wut?

 

If all you want is lots of gloss buy the cheapo liquid shoe polish dispensers with foam applicator, no need to over think it.

 

I've never used Sno Seal, but I thought it was pretty similar? What's the difference?

post #3533 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by grendel View Post

 

I've never used Sno Seal, but I thought it was pretty similar? What's the difference?

afaik, yeah they do pretty much the same job of sealing/waterproofing. but beyond that, there might be a difference.

post #3534 of 10706
A before and after photo comparison. I've never try this before but I figure why not. The shoes were thrifted, from Huntsman and Sons, toes were scuffed up pretty bad, some dark areas where the leather was ripped a bit, thought I would used some Saphir cream with Kiwi was to darken the toes a bit. Clean with Lexol cleaner, Saphir universal cream, Saphir Mahogany cream, then brown Kiwi wax. The results are a bit redder than I'd like, I might have to get my hands on some dark brown cream and wax.

Before


After
post #3535 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stirling View Post

Sno seal similar to obenaufs??? lol, wut?

 

If all you want is lots of gloss buy the cheapo liquid shoe polish dispensers with foam applicator, no need to over think it.

 

Get out of this thread.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bik2101 View Post

afaik, yeah they do pretty much the same job of sealing/waterproofing. but beyond that, there might be a difference.

 

 

They're both beeswaxed-based products for weather-proofing.

post #3536 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by grendel View Post

I've never used Sno Seal, but I thought it was pretty similar? What's the difference?

Actually the products are quite different (and the manufacturer of each will tell you so).

First, Obenauf's makes both a leather oil that is popular for conditioning boots, and a Heavy Duty Leather Protector (HDLP). The leather oil is a mixture of mostly "natural oils" and a small amount of wax, and seems to work quite well at conditioning the thicker leather used in boots.

Obenauf's HDLP (which I believe we are referring to here) is that same leather oil suspended in a much higher ratio of beeswax and resins. Obenauf's states "If exposed to heat or flexing the oils are released faster so leather gets oiled instead of parched and cracked.".

Atsko Sno Seal is basically beeswax with no additional oils added. Atsko states "Our competitors' greases, oil, and animal products are able to migrate through the leather till they clog all the pores. These waterproofing products fill the natural spaces that are supposed to absorb perspiration and insulate.".

Basically what it comes down to is that Obenauf's is high in oils and Sno Seal is not.

And, while it is true that without oil leather will dry out and crack, it is also true that too much oil will clog the natural cellular structure of the leather that is supposed to absorb perspiration and insulate. It's all a matter of degree.

Both are using beeswax as the main water repellant, but Obenauf's introduces a fair amount of oil as well, while Sno Seal introduces almost none.

In regard to shine: It will be harder to get a shine when using Obenauf's versus Sno Seal because of the oils.

I would use neither on a pair of nice dress/business shoes, mainly because of the leather density.
Edited by glenjay - 1/7/13 at 3:18pm
post #3537 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

In regard to shine: It will be harder to get a shine when using Obenauf's versus Sno Seal because of the oils.

 

Noted. Thanks for the information. Explains why I was able to shine SnoSeal and Christian is struggling to with HDLP.

 

I don't think either are really needed on Shell, but that didn't stop me, lol.

post #3538 of 10706
Before:
Quote:
Originally Posted by P. Bateman View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Hey Gdot,
It's cigar shell. I'd read that drying agents in rubber cement are also very absorbant. In any event, it didn't seem to have any effect.
Here's a macro of the spot. It looks more like a water spot but I know it's from food. This photo was taken post-cornstarch.

On the shoe it's barely noticeable:

I'm contemplating using light dish soap and a tooth brush for one final scrub. Thoughts? After that I'll apply reno and polish with Saphir light brown wax and hope fort he best.

After Venetian shoe cream and Saphir wax. The oil spot is still there every so barely. No one but me will notice and I think it will fade with more polishing and conditioning.

post #3539 of 10706
Barely noticeable, congrats.
post #3540 of 10706
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarioImpemba View Post

Noted. Thanks for the information. Explains why I was able to shine SnoSeal and Christian is struggling to with HDLP.

I don't think either are really needed on Shell, but that didn't stop me, lol.

Struggling is a bit exaggerated.

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