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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 167

post #2491 of 10109
I love it on my waxy leather, but I haven't tried it on regular claf yet, will keep you guys updated. Thanks for the tip, G, love your pics! icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #2492 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

Sorry I haven't posted in a while, but I had a few minutes, and I find this topic very interesting.
Most oils/fats used to condition leather seem to be animal fats, like lanolin, mink oil, etc... which are saturated fats, as opposed to vegtable/plant oils like peanut, walnut, olive, corn, etc... which vary in saturation. There is a variation in the types of acid that each oil contains, such as lauric acid, palmitic acid, stearic acic, etc... that help define the saturation.
I wish I understood more as to the impact and longevity of various oils on leather, but I know a saturated fat/oil will not turn rancid nearly a quickly as an unsaturated fat/oil.
I do know enough not to use walnut oil on my walnut brown bluchers.

Yes but what about pecan oil on pecan colored shoes....................................

Or cherry oil on vintage cherry...........................................what you got to say 'bout that Mr.!?!?!?!!

And since I like a baked potato with sour cream will sour cream also do well on my shoes?

devil.gif

I guess there is some logic in using animal based oils on an animal hide. And I'd never dream of putting olive oil or other vegetable based oil on my shoes as I've heard some here say that they have done.

I will drop one more random tidbit. Nick Horween is specific that his shell cordovan is stuffed with a mixture that is high in neetsfeet oil. And thus he recommends it for moisturizing of shell. (Although he also recommends several other products which I can't remember.)
post #2493 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

Yes but what about pecan oil on pecan colored shoes....................................
Or cherry oil on vintage cherry...........................................what you got to say 'bout that Mr.!?!?!?!!
And since I like a baked potato with sour cream will sour cream also do well on my shoes?
devil.gif
I guess there is some logic in using animal based oils on an animal hide. And I'd never dream of putting olive oil or other vegetable based oil on my shoes as I've heard some here say that they have done.
I will drop one more random tidbit. Nick Horween is specific that his shell cordovan is stuffed with a mixture that is high in neetsfeet oil. And thus he recommends it for moisturizing of shell. (Although he also recommends several other products which I can't remember.)

Sour cream should only be used on cream colored bucs, but be sure to do the whole upper, you don't want blotchy. BTW, it's also a great way to get cats to follow you home.

On a serious note: I have always wondered why you couldn't use something like coconut oil to condition shoes. It is a highly saturated fat, and it is edible. I don't see how it would make a difference from lanolin in hydrating the cellular structure of leather. If anyone knows the answer to this please post.

[disclaimer: my advice on nubuck care is probably incorrect (but don't tell Gdot)]
post #2494 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post

 Nick Horween is specific that his shell cordovan is stuffed with a mixture that is high in neetsfeet oil. And thus he recommends it for moisturizing of shell.

 

Hmm I'm somewhat dubious of that. Shell doesn't require moisturising so I suspect Nick didn't say that or what he said was misconstrued.

post #2495 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by glenjay View Post

On a serious note: I have always wondered why you couldn't use something like coconut oil to condition shoes. 

 

It is used in a few products alongside other plant & animal oils. It's never used as a standalone because it has tendency to rub off onto clothing & is comparatively expensive.

post #2496 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stirling View Post

Hmm I'm somewhat dubious of that. Shell doesn't require moisturising so I suspect Nick didn't say that or what he said was misconstrued.

Well, shell doesn't often require moisturizing. But it's a myth that it is never required. The fats and waxes that are added back into the shell after tanning are just that - added. Even though the shell fiber is dense and it resists drying, it will eventually dry out just like any other leather.

I've not been able the find the quote from Nick in question. All I've found today from Nick regarding shell care is a specific mention of Venetian and a general recommendation that Saphir makes good products for the care of shell as well. I can also find the recommendation of neetsfeet oil in terms of treating chromexel.

I could perhaps concede that I have conflated these two.

But shell definitely benefits from occasional moisturizing.

Now, can anyone tell me why these cats are following me everywhere?
post #2497 of 10109
whether you've conflated them or not, saphir shell cream is neatsfoot oil based.
post #2498 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post


Well, shell doesn't often require moisturizing. But it's a myth that it is never required. The fats and waxes that are added back into the shell after tanning are just that - added. 

 

I didn't know that thanks very much for sharing your tanning experience.

post #2499 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

whether you've conflated them or not, saphir shell cream is neatsfoot oil based.

 

Pretty much all the Saphir cream polishes are. 

 

Question is what is neatsfoot oil?

post #2500 of 10109
just animal fat that happens to have the properties of being liquid at low temperatures and some other random shit.
post #2501 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

just animal fat that happens to have the properties of being liquid at low temperatures and some other random shit.

 

Inclusive of petroleum based mineral oils...

post #2502 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by hendrix View Post

just animal fat that happens to have the properties of being liquid at low temperatures and some other random shit.

Made from the shin bones and feet of cattle.
post #2503 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stirling View Post

Inclusive of petroleum based mineral oils...

I believe so, although that might only be for the "compound" and "prime" and lower grades, while "pure" might actually be all animal fat.
post #2504 of 10109
Quote:
Neat is an archaic name for hoofed animals (i.e. cows, pigs, sheep). Neatsfoot oil is oil rendered from the feet of cattle or hoofed animals. In the slaughterhouse, the feet would be cut off the animal, split, put into a large vat and boiled. The oils that rose to the top would be skimmed off and sold as "Neatsfoot Oil." Today, thanks to the US military, there is no actual Neatsfoot oil in Neatsfoot Oil! Let me explain. Back in the 1930's the US Army wrote a Military Specification (Mil Spec) that defined the properties of Neatsfoot Oil. Oil merchants bidding for government contracts quickly discovered other, less expensive, oils would meet this Mil Spec. Today, Neatsfoot Oil is any oil, regardless of where it comes from, that meets this US
Government Mil Spec. Neatsfoot Oil now is mostly derived from pigs. Lard is pressed and the resulting liquid, which can be supplemented with mineral oil and/or reclaimed motor oil, is sold as "Neatsfoot Oil". Neatsfoot oil is widely used in the equestrian industry (saddles and tack) but has a tendency to be quite greasy making it unsuitable for leather upholstery.

http://forum.roadfly.com/threads/8242747?p=8249398#post8249398

remembering that Lexol has its own product to endorse...
post #2505 of 10109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdot View Post


Made from the shin bones and feet of cattle.

 

Oh Lordy are you for real Gdot? That practice stopped a couple of decades ago (at least!).

 

You really shouldn't keep quoting stuff you read on the net as some kind of acquired knowledge, highlights your bitsy knowledge no end.

 

Don't get me wrong I applaud your enthusiasm & helpful disposition on all the threads, but the misinformation & misinterpretations are regrettably frequent.

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