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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1259

post #18871 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by daamiso View Post

So im really confused now. to much shoe care products


I found some natural products from
Otter wax
Armstrongs all natural

But i dont get it how for instance saddle soap from otter wax contains bees wax but sadle soap is a cleaner how can the conditioner get in the leather if there is wax in the soap wont that make a layer so the conditioner wont penetrate.

Would it even be bad for the shoes if you clean them with oliv oil soap and then condition them with coconut oil and then put bees wax on them for the protection layer. Are the extra ingredients even necessary

I just dont get it why so many companies put in so much cemicals in there.


Ou and is it really Necessary to use the same color polish or cream as the shoe what happens if you just use neutral on all of the diferent

Sorry for my english

Thx for the help

Mike

Think of saddle soap like Dove soap or any moisturizing facial soap. The surfactants are mild, and their primary purpose is to carry away the grime, while still leaving a layer of emulsified oils behind.

The "chemicals" are used because they serve a purpose. Typically theyvwork better than other substances ir they keep the cost of the product at a particular price point.

Neutral waxes tend to yellow or become cloudy over time.
post #18872 of 19072


my mildly neglected alden chukkas always seem dry in the creases.
i hit them up with reno every few months, and the last few times i tried a coat of lexol.
any other suggestions?
post #18873 of 19072
@tropics
Try stripping them with Renomat or the like and building up a new coat of polish.
post #18874 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by tropics View Post



my mildly neglected alden chukkas always seem dry in the creases.
i hit them up with reno every few months, and the last few times i tried a coat of lexol.
any other suggestions?

Lexol is the correct solution. Renovateur doesn't provide that much conditioning. You can be a little more liberal with the Lexol that you probably think.

Don't strip them like the other bloke says.

Keep in mind this is just what shell does some times. The rolls get rough and bloomy.
post #18875 of 19072
Has anyone had the opportunity to try the new Saphir Mirror Gloss Wax Polish yet?
post #18876 of 19072
I missed that they were shell.
post #18877 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by TexasTexter View Post

Guys, I am having an issue.  When I use Saphir Renovatuer the shoes come out opaque looking.  Why?  Very dull finish.  What am I doing wrong?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post

Its not a polish. You have to follow up with polish or wax.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

You need to brush it after it dries (3-5 minutes).

In my experience and other's, Saphir Renovateur needs to be brushed very soon after applied, or it is hard to buff out. 5 minutes is too long. I have found once it is applied, I start brushing it out right away and get great results. Letting it over dry is bad news bears.
post #18878 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megakurth View Post

Has anyone had the opportunity to try the new Saphir Mirror Gloss Wax Polish yet?

Never heard of it, but I would imagine it is just a higher % of carnauba, which is the hardest wax and leads to a faster mirror shine. The downfall of such proportions of carnauba is if something strikes the mirror shine it tends "shatter" the wax. This means you have to strip it and reapply. I find that Saphir regular wax is great for mirror shining because it stays flexible and if something strikes it it will just put the surface in that spot and not shatter. Also, I have found that leaving the life off of Saphir wax for a while to let the turpentine evaporate out helps for mirror shining with it because the wax is drier.

Again, I am just speculating about this new product.
post #18879 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Megakurth View Post

Has anyone had the opportunity to try the new Saphir Mirror Gloss Wax Polish yet?

Never heard of it, but I would imagine it is just a higher % of carnauba, which is the hardest wax and leads to a faster mirror shine. The downfall of such proportions of carnauba is if something strikes the mirror shine it tends "shatter" the wax. This means you have to strip it and reapply. I find that Saphir regular wax is great for mirror shining because it stays flexible and if something strikes it it will just put the surface in that spot and not shatter. Also, I have found that leaving the life off of Saphir wax for a while to let the turpentine evaporate out helps for mirror shining with it because the wax is drier.

Again, I am just speculating about this new product.

 

I was going to ask if anyone would have some feedback to give on this new wax. 

 

@patrickBOOTH is right on the money.  This is the description I found:

 

Polish MIRROR GLOSS Saphir Médaille d'Or is  a mixture of natural hard waxes which have been selected for their shiny qualities, like Montan, carnauba or beeswax, […], all of which are concentrated together in a formula in which naturally fatty solvents like turpentine are mixed in the most correct proportions to allow perfect hold and optimal drying during and between the different applications.  […]

 

Allows to rapidly create the glazing, easy to use. Quicker results than with Polish Pâte de Luxe Saphir Médaille d'Or, which has a softer formula which, in addition, also nourrishes and hydrates the leather, which MIRROR GLOSS does not.

 

Use MIRROR GLOSS Saphir Médaille d'Or after having first applied Cream Shoe Polish Pommadier Saphir Médaille d'Or or Shoe Polish Pâte de Luxe Saphir Médaille d'Or, and apply on the areas you want to glaze.


Perfectly suitable for the fans of glazing who are in a hurry or lack experience.

post #18880 of 19072

My interest in quality footwear coupled with an appreciation for vintage and antique items has led to a small collection of shoemaker's and cobbler's items. Around the turn of the last century Massachusetts was the shoe making capital of the world (http://news.wgbh.org/post/how-lynn-became-shoe-capitol-world).  As a result of all that shoe making history it's common the find these items at our local flea markets and antique shops.

 

For instance, in 1899 United Shoe Machinery Co. (USMC) was formed after the merger of the Goodyear Machinery Company, Consolidated Hand Lasting Machine Company, and McKay Shoe Machinery Company. USMC employed thousands in the shoe making industry all over MA. They even built the first skyscraper in Boston in the 30's.

 

I'm always on the lookout for USM/USMC's unique logo and have found crates, hand tools, etc. in my travels and on ebay. It's funny that much of the shoe making ephemera on ebay is from little towns all over New England.

 

 

 

 

 

These lasting pliers by J. Nibb (top) and R. Timmins & Sons both made their way from Birmingham England to New England sometime in the last century.

 

 

 

I just started posting these on my IG if interested:

 

https://www.instagram.com/patrick_byr/

post #18881 of 19072
Much to my dismay I have discovered the gash pictured below on my Alden cordovan plain toe bluchers. I have reached out to Alden of Carmel, whose only advice was to apply a thick coat of paste wax polish, which runs counter to what I have otherwise heard about being sparing with polish on cordovan.

Where I live we are devoid of quality cobblers, so I'm afraid I'm at the mercy of the Styleforum brain trust. Any advice is appreciated.

post #18882 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by whorishconsumer View Post

Much to my dismay I have discovered the gash pictured below on my Alden cordovan plain toe bluchers. I have reached out to Alden of Carmel, whose only advice was to apply a thick coat of paste wax polish, which runs counter to what I have otherwise heard about being sparing with polish on cordovan.

Where I live we are devoid of quality cobblers, so I'm afraid I'm at the mercy of the Styleforum brain trust. Any advice is appreciated.

 

Not a problem at all. A little bit of cordovan cream, then brush and brush and brush until your arms fall off. Even a wet rag wipe down, then brush to eternity.

post #18883 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by whorishconsumer View Post

Much to my dismay I have discovered the gash pictured below on my Alden cordovan plain toe bluchers. I have reached out to Alden of Carmel, whose only advice was to apply a thick coat of paste wax polish, which runs counter to what I have otherwise heard about being sparing with polish on cordovan.

Where I live we are devoid of quality cobblers, so I'm afraid I'm at the mercy of the Styleforum brain trust. Any advice is appreciated.


I agree with @Petepan some conditioner/cordovan cream and A LOT of brushing.  I would start with Lexol/Bick 4 first, I got some really nasty scuffs out of an old pair of Aldens with Lexol alone, though I still gave both shoes a coat of AE cordovan cream afterwards. 

post #18884 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

Not a problem at all. A little bit of cordovan cream, then brush and brush and brush until your arms fall off. Even a wet rag wipe down, then brush to eternity.

@Petepan, @ace13x

Thank you both. I'm going to order some No. 8 paste wax for this purpose.

In the meantime, any additional input/substantiation by other users is welcome.
post #18885 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by whorishconsumer View Post


@Petepan, @ace13x

Thank you both. I'm going to order some No. 8 paste wax for this purpose.

In the meantime, any additional input/substantiation by other users is welcome.


I would not use paste wax on Shell.  I'll pos some pics about that later today.

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