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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1254

post #18796 of 19079

I still think you could stick a topy on those if you want to just extend their life at minimal cost.  I did exactly this to an old cheap pair of slip-on Grensons that I was about to throw out and they are still going strong as my "beater" shoes.  I wouldn't do it to anything half decent that you were planning on keeping for many years.

post #18797 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

I still think you could stick a topy on those if you want to just extend their life at minimal cost.  I did exactly this to an old cheap pair of slip-on Grensons that I was about to throw out and they are still going strong as my "beater" shoes.  I wouldn't do it to anything half decent that you were planning on keeping for many years.

These are C&Js and I'd like to wear them for at least a couple of years... Lovely shoes!
post #18798 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by San780 View Post


These are C&Js and I'd like to wear them for at least a couple of years... Lovely shoes!

 

For C&J I would get the full resole!

post #18799 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

For C&J I would get the full resole!

Thank you very much for clarifying it for me. Highly appreciated! I would get in touch with C&J tomorrow to get an idea of how much a resole would cost... I hope it isn't crazily expensive like that of John Lobb...
post #18800 of 19079
A half sole is just what it sounds like. A full sole (or full resole) goes from the toe to underneath the heel. A half sole is a resole that goes from the toe to just behind the ball of the foot (and somewhat into the waist).

A half sole would re-balance everything and if you ask for a sole protector (Topy) at the same time, it would give the repairman a pristine surface to adhere the Topy to.

It's a reasonable solution if you want to keep the shoes.

A half sole would cost about 2/3 the cost of a full sole but the Topy might make that up.
post #18801 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

A half sole is just what it sounds like. A full sole (or full resole) goes from the toe to underneath the heel. A half sole is a resole that goes from the toe to just behind the ball of the foot (and somewhat into the waist.

a half sole would re-balance everything and if you ask for a sole protector (Topy) at the same time give the repairman a pristine surface to adhere the Topy to. It's a reasonable solution if you want to keep the shoes.

A half sole would cost about 2/3 the cost of a full sole but the Topy might make that up.

And I thought it wasn't possible. Thank you very much for educating me, Sir. This warrants a trip to a competent cobbler.
post #18802 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by San780 View Post


And I thought it wasn't possible. Thank you very much for educating me, Sir. This warrants a trip to a competent cobbler.

 

If you're going re-sole, I'd really consider a full job, and maybe think about getting a more durable sole (JR sole) as well.  I'm not a giant fan of the topy approach...

 

If they are good shoes, they'll be worth it.

post #18803 of 19079
The purpose of a sole guard is to prevent the leather from wearing out. They have other advantages as well (if you are a fan of them).
If you use sole guards to patch a worn sole you won't get the intended value out of them.

I recommend full soles over half soles on high-grades such as C&J's.
post #18804 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post

The purpose of a sole guard is to prevent the leather from wearing out. They have other advantages as well (if you are a fan of them).
If you use sole guards to patch a worn sole you won't get the intended value out of them.

I recommend full soles over half soles on high-grades such as C&J's.

Does the 'grade' of the shoe make a difference when choosing between a half sole and a full sole? Specifically, would you do a half sole on a Meermin/AE shoe rather than a full sole? If so, why? 

post #18805 of 19079
I moved last week Wednesday. I packed most of my shoes into their shoe bags and original boxes, and put all of them into a very large moving box. Somehow that box ended up in the garage and stayed there until tonight (about 5 days). The weather here was pretty hot for the first couple of days and then got rainy. I'm assuming the heat level in the garage was quite high, as well as the humidity. Now I'm worried that maybe this caused some damage to my shoes?? Is there anything I need to do now that the box has been brought into the house?
post #18806 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post
 

Does the 'grade' of the shoe make a difference when choosing between a half sole and a full sole? Specifically, would you do a half sole on a Meermin/AE shoe rather than a full sole? If so, why? 

SC (R. Bestteti?) and some other top makers do half resoles mainly due to the pegged waist.  I think all depends on the expertise of your local cobbler to do a good job and the money you want to spend.  Although I prefer a full resole job at the factory to inspect inner components/fudge wheel/irons, if possible. The main problem is the crazy money you pay at the factory for the job; I think the cost should be 1/5 of the price of the shoes (with this policy I am sure makers still would do profit and would attract many more customers)

 

Im not sure if doing a good half resole with a different leather outsole would affect the structure of the shoe.

post #18807 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post
 

Does the 'grade' of the shoe make a difference when choosing between a half sole and a full sole? Specifically, would you do a half sole on a Meermin/AE shoe rather than a full sole? If so, why? 

 

IMO this is partially subjective.  You have to factor: cost vs replacement, degree of service (is it just a resole or is it a complete factory refurbish), and condition of the upper and insole.  Generally speaking the more expensive (or difficult to replace) a shoe is, the more worthwhile it is to spend the extra money on making them as close to new as possible.  Also you may have a pair that has personal value that exceeds the value to others or a style that is no longer made which could skew what you decide to do.  

 

I will say as far as AE is concerned a normal full resole/refurbish (what they call the Standard Package) is decent value for their more expensive dress shoes/boots.  They recently ran a promotion which also gave you a $50 gift card for a new pair of shoes which potentially made it a very good value if you had plans to buy more shoes.  Of course, if you have a good cobbler who can do the same for less, that is an option to consider.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

SC (R. Bestteti?) and some other top makers do half resoles mainly due to the pegged waist.  I think all depends on the expertise of your local cobbler to do a good job and the money you want to spend.  Although I prefer a full resole job at the factory to inspect inner components/fudge wheel/irons, if possible. The main problem is the crazy money you pay at the factory for the job; I think the cost should be 1/5 of the price of the shoes (with this policy I am sure makers still would do profit and would attract many more customers)

 

Im not sure if doing a good half resole with a different leather outsole would affect the structure of the shoe.

 

One point I would bring up is, you can't base the price a company charges for a full resole or full factory refurbish solely on the price of shoe (in your example 1/5).  There is a minimum cost to them on materials and labor.  It may likely COST them the same to resole a $200 shoe as it would a $500 shoe.

post #18808 of 19079

^You are completley right, I just wanted to express my indignation with factory prices for resole (1/3 of the shoe cost in many cases).  Lets say between 50 usd and 120 usd for rapid stitch shoe at the factory.  That would be fair.

post #18809 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

^You are completley right, I just wanted to express my indignation with factory prices for resole (1/3 of the shoe cost in many cases).  Lets say between 50 usd and 120 usd for rapid stitch shoe at the factory.  That would be fair.

C&J is quoting me 160 euros for a resole... I find it extremely expensive indeed.
post #18810 of 19079
A full sole is always better than a half sole. But the OP initially (and even in his last post) expressed a fairly strong reluctance to spend much on these shoes.

If the purpose of shoe repair is to restore the shoe as close as possible to the original appearance as well as functionality, no one can do the job better than C&J, simply because they will put the last back in the shoe when they resole them. IMO.

Every form of refuge has a price.
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