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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1253

post #18781 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 

 

Alden puts acrylic on the surface?  Isn't that basically the "corrected grain" process they use on low grade calf skin?

 

Do the other manufacturers do this on shell cordovan?


Yes this is the corrected grain process or so called bookbinder leather. It is like putting a layer of acryl/plastic or something similar on top of the leather to correct it and smooth it. When putting on shoe cream you will see that it won't settle into the leather.

But I've neven seen this on shell cordovon. The gloss comes from the shell cordovan itself.

post #18782 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 

 

Alden puts acrylic on the surface?  Isn't that basically the "corrected grain" process they use on low grade calf skin?

 

Do the other manufacturers do this on shell cordovan?

This is the post/thread where @mtc2000 removed the Alden acrylic finish with Reno'Mat:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/354137/leather-quality-and-properties/1095#post_6943472

 

Alden forum post on re-adding the acrylic finish:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/85589/the-official-alden-thread-share-enthusiasm-reviews-sizing-advice-and-photos/81435#post_7128732

 

Its not corrected grain. Its a finishing step.

post #18783 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

Alden puts acrylic on the surface?  Isn't that basically the "corrected grain" process they use on low grade calf skin?

Do the other manufacturers do this on shell cordovan?

Careful, essentially what they are doing is adding a topcoat. 99% of all leather has a topcoat on it. Corrected grain is a different process that involves sanding the leather smooth, then adding a thicker topcoat.

Allen Edmonds does something similar. FWIW, this topcoat they apply makes caring for it much easier and resistant to water welts and such.
post #18784 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

Alden puts acrylic on the surface?  Isn't that basically the "corrected grain" process they use on low grade calf skin?

Do the other manufacturers do this on shell cordovan?

Acrylic comes in a number of formulations. In this case it is a flexible "wax," much like your mother probably used on her kitchen floor. No harm no foul...usually it will flake off within a relatively short amount of time.

Sometimes acrylic can be added to, or made into, an opaque dye that is essentially a paint. Most solidly coloured, chrome tanned leathers...even high end calf...have an acrylic topcoat in the form of a "paint."

When it comes to corrected grain leathers...technically any leather that has a texture or a surface that has been altered or modified by mechanical or chemical means is "corrected grain"--the natural grain has been "corrected."

But in the most commonly accepted meaning of the word, it is a leather that has had the grain surface scoured to prepare it for, most often, an entirely artificial replacement such as some form of flexible plastic or vinyl...which is then bonded to the surface of the leather. Sometimes this is even done to splits...although by the time a grain surface is scoured there's probably not much difference.
post #18785 of 19038
Hello,

what would you say is the right way to polish your shoes.

If u

1. Brush the dirt of
2.condition them
3.creme
4. Wax coat

But the next time you do it

How is the conditioner or the creme gona do the job if the wax coat is on there and they say you shouldent use leather soap that offten.

Thx
Edited by daamiso - 9/19/16 at 12:33am
post #18786 of 19038
Gentlemen,

I seem to have a hole developing in my leather sole and I'm wondering what I can do about it short of getting them resoled. I was thinking about getting rubber protector (Topy) over it, but I'm not sure if that's the right way of going about it... Any pointers would be highly appreciated!

post #18787 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by davidVC View Post
 

From what I know (there have been previous posts on the topic), Alden puts acrylic on the Shell to give it a high gloss. By using the deer bone, you are likely removing the glossy acrylic. I have never used a deer bone but along with the oils it has, I believe its like using a ultra fine grit sandpaper on the leather. The Shell is likely fine. I would do both boots. You don't need the acrylic. 

Thanks David.  Actually after living with it for awhile I prefer the less shiny portion.  I sometimes do like a gloss to my shoes/boots but these almost have a patent leather look.  Is there a better way to remove the acrylic?

post #18788 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Also those deer bones are coated in some sort of oil. It could be the oil giving the matte appearance. The deer bone thing is bullshit really. It is only good for smoothing bumps, and cuts, and swells due to water penetration in the fibers. Also, you can use anything smooth to do the same thing.

I figured as much and from my experience I must agree.  The back of a spoon worked wonders on some scuffs on another pair of shoes I had after an embarrassing slip on some ice while trying to get into my car. 

post #18789 of 19038

How important does everyone find it to clean boots with saddle/castile soap? So far, I have just been wiping down, brushing, and conditioning my Vibergs, but I've heard some recommend regular cleaning with some kind of soap.

post #18790 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crshngdwn View Post
 

How important does everyone find it to clean boots with saddle/castile soap? So far, I have just been wiping down, brushing, and conditioning my Vibergs, but I've heard some recommend regular cleaning with some kind of soap.

The only time that I use soap is on work/hiking type boots that actually get dirty.  I used saddle soap once on a pair of used dress shoes that I bought only because they were pretty gunky.  I use a damp cloth on my casual/dress shoes and boots in between conditioning.  Unless your out hiking in them or get them truly dirty somehow I don't think that it is necessary.  I think that your current procedure is perfect.

post #18791 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchaplow View Post
 

The only time that I use soap is on work/hiking type boots that actually get dirty.  I used saddle soap once on a pair of used dress shoes that I bought only because they were pretty gunky.  I use a damp cloth on my casual/dress shoes and boots in between conditioning.  Unless your out hiking in them or get them truly dirty somehow I don't think that it is necessary.  I think that your current procedure is perfect.


Thanks for the response! Yeah, I'm just wearing them casually in an urban environment, so excessive dirt has not really been an issue for me.

post #18792 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by San780 View Post

Gentlemen,

I seem to have a hole developing in my leather sole and I'm wondering what I can do about it short of getting them resoled. I was thinking about getting rubber protector (Topy) over it, but I'm not sure if that's the right way of going about it... Any pointers would be highly appreciated!

 

Ideally you would get a full resole on those, but you could get away with a topy over the top of that if you want to.

post #18793 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

Ideally you would get a full resole on those, but you could get away with a topy over the top of that if you want to.

Thank you very much for your kind answer. I thought I could get away with a Topy but apparently I'd have to get it totally resoled/recrafted...
post #18794 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by San780 View Post

Gentlemen,

I seem to have a hole developing in my leather sole and I'm wondering what I can do about it short of getting them resoled. I was thinking about getting rubber protector (Topy) over it, but I'm not sure if that's the right way of going about it... Any pointers would be highly appreciated!

If you put a sole protector over it now you will unbalance the shoe even more than it is now. The sole will be nearly full thickness around the periphery and paper thin in the middle.

What's more a sole protector won't stick well to a worn out leather sole.

Putting a sole protector on without doing at least a half sole first is just a Rube Goldberg solution. Might as well just stick silicone caulk in and under the hole...you will get just about the same results for less money and no more effort..
post #18795 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

If you put a sole protector over it now you will unbalance the shoe even more than it is now. The sole will be nearly full thickness around the periphery and paper thin in the middle.

What's more a sole protector won't stick well to a worn out leather sole.

Putting a sole protector on without doing at least a half sole first is just a Rube Goldberg solution. Might as well just stick silicone caulk in and under the hole...you will get just about the same results for less money and no more effort..

Thank you very much for your kind advice! Being a noob, can you please tell me what exactly half sole is? I understand what resoling is but I'd like to understand what half soling is. I hope you won't mind helping me out!

Thank you once again.
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