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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1250

post #18736 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Hi DW. Yes, I had sort of anticipated that my posting might be taken literally. That's why I included the unicorn.  Mind you, I have a small selection of unicorn horns, priced at $120 a piece. They are proving to be a bestseller, so it's a case of first come, first served.  Terms and conditions apply. 


lol8[1].gif
post #18737 of 19067
Hi all,

I remember reading that someone on this forum was applying Obenaufs HD LP to leather soles. I could see this to possibly reduce water and salt penetration. Is this something that's recommended? What effect will it have on wear?

Thanks
post #18738 of 19067

Guys - any tips on using Saphir Invulner Protector spray on calf leather shoes/boots?

 

It is best to spray over an already waxed finish?  If you later apply wax over a sprayed shoe, would the solvent in the wax basically remove the Invulner layer?  How often should I apply it?

post #18739 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post

Guys - any tips on using Saphir Invulner Protector spray on calf leather shoes/boots?

It is best to spray over an already waxed finish?  If you later apply wax over a sprayed shoe, would the solvent in the wax basically remove the Invulner layer?  How often should I apply it?
I use it on my suede & boot specially pebble cc that's all
post #18740 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc808314 View Post

Hi all,

I remember reading that someone on this forum was applying Obenaufs HD LP to leather soles. I could see this to possibly reduce water and salt penetration. Is this something that's recommended? What effect will it have on wear?

Thanks

I did an experiment with this years ago. In my experience it made the soles wear faster. Anything that softens the soles will make them wear faster. I no longer do anything to the soles of my shoes.
post #18741 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I did an experiment with this years ago. In my experience it made the soles wear faster. Anything that softens the soles will make them wear faster. I no longer do anything to the soles of my shoes.
Thank you
post #18742 of 19067
Has anyone used Fiebing's 100% Pure Neatsfoot oil on CXL leather? It's a much cheaper option than Saphir's Greasy Leather Cream, which has Neeatsfoot oil as base.

Thanks
post #18743 of 19067
Lexol-nf is the better product esp. if you want to avoid darkening the leather too much.
post #18744 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

Lexol-nf is the better product esp. if you want to avoid darkening the leather too much.

Thanks. I will be using them on natural colored CXL and would prefer not to darken. If I remember correctly, I read on Horween's website to go with pure Neatsfoot oil. The Lexol NF doesn't appear to be pure NF. What are some of the negatives?

By the way, is this the one that you recommended?
https://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1408-Neatsfoot-Dressing-Non-Darkening/dp/B000QFQE68/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473457069&sr=8-1&keywords=lexol+neatsfoot
post #18745 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc808314 View Post

Has anyone used Fiebing's 100% Pure Neatsfoot oil on CXL leather? It's a much cheaper option than Saphir's Greasy Leather Cream, which has Neeatsfoot oil as base.

Thanks


Second on the Lexol.

post #18746 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc808314 View Post

Thanks. I will be using them on natural colored CXL and would prefer not to darken. If I remember correctly, I read on Horween's website to go with pure Neatsfoot oil. The Lexol NF doesn't appear to be pure NF. What are some of the negatives?

By the way, is this the one that you recommended?
https://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1408-Neatsfoot-Dressing-Non-Darkening/dp/B000QFQE68/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1473457069&sr=8-1&keywords=lexol+neatsfoot

That's news to me. If so, it is a relatively recent change of formula AFAIK.

Lexol-nf is just highly homogenized neatsfoot...that's what Lexol told me some years back. If it has anything else in it, it's probably just water or Lexol brown...which has a lot of water in it.

Yes, that's the one.
post #18747 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

That's news to me. If so, it is a relatively recent change of formula AFAIK.

Lexol-nf is just highly homogenized neatsfoot...that's what Lexol told me some years back. If it has anything else in it, it's probably just water or Lexol brown...which has a lot of water in it.

I am just going of off Amazon listing. Below are the listed ingredients:

Neatsfoot Oil, Peg 75 Lanolin, Propylene Glycol, Water, Preservative
post #18748 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc808314 View Post

I am just going of off Amazon listing. Below are the listed ingredients:

Neatsfoot Oil, Peg 75 Lanolin, Propylene Glycol, Water, Preservative

I dunno...

That said, you asked about the negatives...I don't see anything to be concerned about in the formula.
post #18749 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by cc808314 View Post


I am just going of off Amazon listing. Below are the listed ingredients:

Neatsfoot Oil, Peg 75 Lanolin, Propylene Glycol, Water, Preservative


The Peg 75 Lanolin is an emulsifier (gets the Neatsfoot Oil to mix with the water in the form of an emulsion), the Proplene Glycol is an adjuvant (helps the Peg 75 Lanolin do its job) <--for non-technical discussions you may consider it an ancillary emulsifier.  The Preservative (typically something like Ethyl Paraben or Propyl Paraben) is there to keep the Neatsfoot oil from going rancid and extend self life.

 

Edit: In case your curious, PEG stands for Polyethylene Glycol, and 75 refers to the average number of ethylene glycol units in the polymer chain)

post #18750 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post


The Peg 75 Lanolin is an emulsifier (gets the Neatsfoot Oil to mix with the water in the form of an emulsion), the Proplene Glycol is an adjuvant (helps the Peg 75 Lanolin do its job) <--for non-technical discussions you may consider it an ancillary emulsifier.  The Preservative (typically something like Ethyl Paraben or Propyl Paraben) is there to keep the Neatsfoot oil from going rancid and extend self life.

Edit: In case your curious, PEG stands for Polyethylene Glycol, and 75 refers to the average number of ethylene glycol units in the polymer chain)

Thank you very much for your help.
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