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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1241

post #18601 of 19038

Hey everyone, I'm about to purchase a pair of RM Williams Suede Chelsea Boots in chocolate and I just wanted to confirm what I've read in this thread and ask about seemingly conflicting bits of advice.

 

I've used and since run out of the Saphir Omni'Nettoyant Suede Shampoo, but it's my understanding (and how I used it) that this is more for rescuing damaged/dirty suede and I don't really need it for NIB care or preventative measures. I've also lost the suede eraser and brushes I used with that, so I was thinking what I'll need to start out care for these is:

 

Suede protector a la Terrago Nano, though I'm wondering if there's a best/most recommended one for this.

Suede brush & Eraser like this one

 

Should I also grab a brush that has the rubber nibs on it?

Should I buy something like the Omni'Nettoyant for future needs? (Specfically, how likely will I need it if I'm applying something like Terrago Nano protector?)

 

Am I missing anything else obvious? I don't think you need a cloth for suede shoes, but as I said I have none at all so if I should pick one up let me know as well.

 

Thanks for the help.

post #18602 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheloniusDrunk View Post

Hey everyone, I'm about to purchase a pair of RM Williams Suede Chelsea Boots in chocolate and I just wanted to confirm what I've read in this thread and ask about seemingly conflicting bits of advice.

I've used and since run out of the Saphir Omni'Nettoyant Suede Shampoo, but it's my understanding (and how I used it) that this is more for rescuing damaged/dirty suede and I don't really need it for NIB care or preventative measures. I've also lost the suede eraser and brushes I used with that, so I was thinking what I'll need to start out care for these is:

Suede protector a la Terrago Nano, though I'm wondering if there's a best/most recommended one for this.
Suede brush & Eraser like this one

Should I also grab a brush that has the rubber nibs on it?
Should I buy something like the Omni'Nettoyant for future needs? (Specfically, how likely will I need it if I'm applying something like Terrago Nano protector?)

Am I missing anything else obvious? I don't think you need a cloth for suede shoes, but as I said I have none at all so if I should pick one up let me know as well.

Thanks for the help.

Your mileage may vary, but I find I've only needed protectant and a suede brush and eraser.

Nothing against the Tagaro product, but the Allen Edmonds suede protectant works just as well (I've done the same demo Tagaro does and poured a bottle of water on my suede. )

The AE suede eraser and brush kit is nothing special, same as the kits they sell in the big box stores. But regardless it works just fine. They also sell a brush with the rubber nubs on one side, and brass bristles surrounded by nylon bristles.
post #18603 of 19038
Any clear shampoo you use for your hair can be used for suede as well. I followed this blog post by the creator of GlenKaren shoe care products and had fantastic results.

http://oldleathershoe.com/wordpress/?p=1406

Edit:

To clarify, I followed the blog for instructions to make a homemade suede cleaner. Once I have a shampoo-water mixture in a cup, I dip a clean horsehair dauber brush directly into the cup, let some excess fluid drip off, then brush and make a lather into the suede. I follow that up with a wet paper towel to absorb the extra shampoo, though I suppose you could run the shoes under the faucet as well. I then leave the shoes to dry overnight and then give them a healthy brushing once they're dry. Brings back the nap and cleans the suede very well.
post #18604 of 19038
When I shampoo my hair I'm told I need to use conditioner afterwards

This is because the shampoo takes the oils away

Does this not apply to suede as well?
post #18605 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

When I shampoo my hair I'm told I need to use conditioner afterwards

This is because the shampoo takes the oils away

Does this not apply to suede as well?

 

If you used a coconut-oil based shampoo, you probably wouldn't need conditioner.  Probably similar if you used an olive-oil based soap/shampoo.

post #18606 of 19038
I actually use both coconut shampoo and conditioner on my suede shoes; first shampoo and rinse, and then conditioner and rinse. I cannot verify if this is heathy for the leather or not in the long run, but the suede gets remarkably softer.
post #18607 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl1955 View Post
 

Munky, you need to get out more!!

 

I was being ironic in my post about having such fun about boxes, Carl!  But you are right - I do need to get out more!  :embar:

post #18608 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

I was being ironic in my post about having such fun about boxes, Carl!  But you are right - I do need to get out more!  :embar:

Me too Munky, your right thou there are some great crafted hardwood boxes out there, it's a nice hobby we all have don't you think?.

 

Best Wishes

 

 

Carl.

post #18609 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carl1955 View Post
 

Me too Munky, your right thou there are some great crafted hardwood boxes out there, it's a nice hobby we all have don't you think?.

 

Best Wishes

 

 

Carl.

 

It's a nice hobby, but expensive. :wow:

post #18610 of 19038
I got a pair of JM Weston's I'd like antiqued. The original finish was screwed up by rain and me. I ended up stripping some of the color off the toe and heel with Saphir Reno Mat thinking I can just antique it with layers of polish, not realizing beforehand what I have is analine dyed leather, not crust. I don't have the desire to obtain the necessary materials and dyes to learn and do the work myself. More importantly, I don't want to screw them up as a first-time attempt. Can folks suggest some places I can send the shoes to in order to get them done, along with contact info? I'm not sure if Ron Rider offers this service anymore...
post #18611 of 19038
Figured this would be the easiest place to get a response. Opened up my Saphir neutral wax today and discovered this:





Was totally dry, but realize the photos make it look more wet than it is. Ran the tin under the faucet with some soap to try and clean it out and it's some stubborn stuff.

Checked my various other tins of different colored wax, and all clean. Is this rust? Mold? Any similar experiences? I store my waxes sealed in the tins, inside of a ziplock bag from which I squeeze out excess air, in a dark drawer.
post #18612 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Any clear shampoo you use for your hair can be used for suede as well. I followed this blog post by the creator of GlenKaren shoe care products and had fantastic results.

http://oldleathershoe.com/wordpress/?p=1406

Edit:

To clarify, I followed the blog for instructions to make a homemade suede cleaner. Once I have a shampoo-water mixture in a cup, I dip a clean horsehair dauber brush directly into the cup, let some excess fluid drip off, then brush and make a lather into the suede. I follow that up with a wet paper towel to absorb the extra shampoo, though I suppose you could run the shoes under the faucet as well. I then leave the shoes to dry overnight and then give them a healthy brushing once they're dry. Brings back the nap and cleans the suede very well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skeen7908 View Post

When I shampoo my hair I'm told I need to use conditioner afterwards

This is because the shampoo takes the oils away

Does this not apply to suede as well?


Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post

If you used a coconut-oil based shampoo, you probably wouldn't need conditioner.  Probably similar if you used an olive-oil based soap/shampoo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cbfn View Post

I actually use both coconut shampoo and conditioner on my suede shoes; first shampoo and rinse, and then conditioner and rinse. I cannot verify if this is heathy for the leather or not in the long run, but the suede gets remarkably softer.

In my opinion the best shampoo for suede would be a chelating shampoo that is meant to take mineral deposits out of hair and remove build up of conditioning agents (minerals can discolor the suede and possibly cause abrasion, conditioning agents are cationic and chemically bond to hair). The idea that hair conditioners put moisture back into hair is misinformed. What they mostly do is add positively charged conditioning agents that bond with the hair and coat it. Oils that are marketed as being in hair conditioners are in there in such low levels they are completely useless. The conditioning effect you are feeling is from the cationic conditioning agents. That said, hair is negatively charged and the conditioning agents are positively charged, this is why they attract each other. Leather fibers are also positively charged, so to put hair conditioner that is positively charged on it would do nothing. Also, non-ionic conditioners are meant to get left behind when mixed with water due to dilution deposition, so what you may experience is a coating of silicone on your leather.

My 2 cents.
Edited by patrickBOOTH - 8/7/16 at 2:13pm
post #18613 of 19038


Too be fair, I add coconut oil to my conditioner, so it is probably that which is resulting in softer suede. Plus it contains no silicone.
post #18614 of 19038
Patrickbooth, for dummies this time

What brand and concentration of shampoo would be best to cationize your chelates or whatever
post #18615 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post





In my opinion the best shampoo for suede would be a chelating shampoo that is meant to take mineral deposits out of hair and remove build up of conditioning agents (minerals can discolor the suede and possibly cause abrasion, conditioning agents are cationic and chemically bond to hair). The idea that hair conditioners put moisture back into hair is misinformed. What they mostly do is add negatively charged conditioning agents that bond with the hair and coat it. Oils that are marketed as being in hair conditioners are in there in such low levels they are completely useless. The conditioning effect you are feeling is from the cationic conditioning agents. That said, hair is negatively charged and the conditioning agents are positively charged, this is why they attract each other. Leather fibers are also positively charged, so to put hair conditioner that is positively charged on it would do nothing. Also, non-ionic conditioners are meant to get left behind when mixed with water due to dilution deposition, so what you may experience is a coating of silicone on your leather.

My 2 cents.

 

That should read positively.  Minor correction (mistype), but your other points are valid.  Particularly, that chelation would be most relevant to keeping your suede tip-top.  Everyone frets about water, but is the minerals dissolved (salts) that are the real problem.  Anyone interested in that, should look for products containing EDTA (a commonly used chelator in contemporary detergents).

 

Still, I've found that unless your suede is hideously dirty, a suede eraser will suffice for cleaning a good deal of the time.  No need to go through the trouble of shampoo.

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