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post #18541 of 19069
I have an older pair of boots from Church's. I would like to glue down a topy and use these only on cruddy winter days. The sole is nowhere near new, and has a significant amount of wear. They're not ready for replacement yet though.
Given that I only plan to wear them a limited number of times in the winter, is there any reason I can't go ahead and glue down the topy without a sole replacement?
Thank you.
post #18542 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

I have an older pair of boots from Church's. I would like to glue down a topy and use these only on cruddy winter days. The sole is nowhere near new, and has a significant amount of wear. They're not ready for replacement yet though.
Given that I only plan to wear them a limited number of times in the winter, is there any reason I can't go ahead and glue down the topy without a sole replacement?
Thank you.
And would cleaning the soles with saddle soap first help, or would that change the pH of the leather too much?
post #18543 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

And would cleaning the soles with saddle soap first help, or would that change the pH of the leather too much?

If you clean the soles with saddle soap...or apply anything to them...or fail to clean them (usually with abrasives) ...or try to put them on a new, unworn, un-prepped outsole, the cement will not stick well or permanently and the Topy / soleguard will come off.

facepalm.gif

--
Edited by DWFII - 7/14/16 at 7:24am
post #18544 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

I have an older pair of boots from Church's. I would like to glue down a topy and use these only on cruddy winter days. The sole is nowhere near new, and has a significant amount of wear. They're not ready for replacement yet though.
Given that I only plan to wear them a limited number of times in the winter, is there any reason I can't go ahead and glue down the topy without a sole replacement?
Thank you.

I know this doesn't address your question (and I apologize in advance), but why not simply wear the current soles down and then resole to rubber?
post #18545 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post


Or replace the rubber part of the heel top piece with a metal one a la Thom Browne



Could be slippery and / or noisy though

Having had some V cleat Florsheims, which were very slippery before I applied nylon heel taps, I cannot imagine risking my life walking on metal taps. If someone can use them and stay upright, good for them. 

I suspect people who don't like the look of heel taps might find metal as objectionable as nylon, but I don't know.

post #18546 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

Having had some V cleat Florsheims, which were very slippery before I applied nylon heel taps, I cannot imagine risking my life walking on metal taps. If someone can use them and stay upright, good for them. 


I suspect people who don't like the look of heel taps might find metal as objectionable as nylon, but I don't know.

The metal heel piece shown in your image is called a Seg. They are in-laid and nailed on. And yes, they are slippery and noisy.
The "V" plates that you mentioned are much smaller. The are shaped like a slice of pizza. Some like them, others don't complaining about noise, slipping and, both tend to yield a "harder" walk.
post #18547 of 19069

I did not mind the sound or the hardness of the V cleat. But wow! were they slippery. I never hit the ground, but I slipped so often and badly on marble floors that I took  mincing little steps till I got home. Did not wear them again until I got the nylon taps.They were fine on sidewalks, but deadly on smooth floors.

 

I recall reading on here that rubber toplifts, or at least rubber at the back quarters wore more slowly than leather. But both wear too fast for me, so I use the nylon/ShoeGoo solution. 

post #18548 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by peppercorn78 View Post

I know this doesn't address your question (and I apologize in advance), but why not simply wear the current soles down and then resole to rubber?
Good question:
I would like to extend the life of these boots a little. I don't think that they're worth the cost of a new sole though.
post #18549 of 19069

I've got a scuff or something here that's discolored the top of the toe of my shoe, and I couldn't seem to do anything to fix it with Allen Edmonds Conditioner and AE walnut polish. 

 

I can't tell if I need to treat this with a saphir product geared towards damaged leather/scuffs. Can you guys help me out?

 

post #18550 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingBuckley View Post
 

I've got a scuff or something here that's discolored the top of the toe of my shoe, and I couldn't seem to do anything to fix it with Allen Edmonds Conditioner and AE walnut polish. 

 

I can't tell if I need to treat this with a saphir product geared towards damaged leather/scuffs. Can you guys help me out?

 

 

With all due respect, Missing, you would have to use a microscope to see the scuff!  They are shoes and they get marked occasionally. Give them a few good brushings and I am sure they will be fine. If they are not already fine.  No need for a big production number! Every good wish, Munky. 

post #18551 of 19069

It's a point well taken, and I'm usually pretty good about taking care of them and allowing the minors bumps and bruises to go by without much issue, I guess it was just the location of it that was bothering me. I probably just need to direct my OCD elsewhere.

post #18552 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingBuckley View Post

I've got a scuff or something here that's discolored the top of the toe of my shoe, and I couldn't seem to do anything to fix it with Allen Edmonds Conditioner and AE walnut polish. 



 



I can't tell if I need to treat this with a saphir product geared towards damaged leather/scuffs. Can you guys help me out?



 



 


Are those Walnut shoes? Look more like Chili or something darker to me...

In any case, condition and brush and eventually it will fade. A darker polish will help over time too...
post #18553 of 19069
Quote:
Originally Posted by MissingBuckley View Post
 

I've got a scuff or something here that's discolored the top of the toe of my shoe, and I couldn't seem to do anything to fix it with Allen Edmonds Conditioner and AE walnut polish. 

 

I can't tell if I need to treat this with a saphir product geared towards damaged leather/scuffs. Can you guys help me out?

 

AE walnut polish is very light and will match up better with lighter areas such as the vamp.

Your scuff is on the darkest part of the burnishing, so as already stated, carefully try tiny amounts of a darker polish to blend into the scuffed area.

post #18554 of 19069

Re: above.  Life is too short for this. They are shoes. 

post #18555 of 19069

@DWFII @Nick V.

 

Any longterm issues with using a cyanoacrylate super glue on leather? I had some loose piping on the heel that I glued down, and it dried it pretty stiff. In retrospect, barge cement would've been a better choice.  

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