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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1236

post #18526 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

I have used many times neutral waxes long ago (since I am in SF I just use it for the sole edges and welt) just to polish my shoes. The point for me is not the concrentration of solvents , but the high proportion of different waxes most premium brands use in their formulas..  I am not an expert whatsoever, but my common sense tells me that the solvent is a means  to distribute the waxes you are introducing and to allow those waxes to penetrate into the pores of the leather (once it reaches that goal the solvent evaporates).  So the results are that you are adding more waxes to the shoe and maybe taking some others and pigments out. What is the final result? Would not be better to use a bit of Renomat for that purpose?. I must admitt that I do not practice mirrow shining or the like, so my experience its limited. 

The solvent dissolves everything, which allows you to rub it off. It is really that simple. Like I said, try it.
post #18527 of 19072

I will, thanks for your answers.

post #18528 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post

You need to understand the composition of neutral wax. Wihtout going into too much details, the summary of it is that neutral wax contains a higher proportion of solvents, which acts to dissolve polish. You dont apply gently, rather, you take a dab and then rub vigorously. Dont take my word for it, just try it and tell me what you think.

This is plain wrong. I have formal training in chemistry and categorically say even if neutral polish has a greater composition of solvents by 2% (accounting for the absence of pigments, assuming the manufacturer hasn't added wax instead) will not be sufficient to dissolve hardened wax and draw it into a cloth.

Sure, if you rub vigorously the solvent in the wax will work to soften and dissolve the wax on the shoe (it can certainly disrupt the smoothness of a mirror shine) but will not take up the wax in a way that will strip the shoe of old wax.

Wax is a solid, and to remove it from the surface of a leather shoe you need to liquefy it (with solvent) to bring the solvent-wax mixture back into the cloth. Putting more wax on wax at best scrapes the surface to interrupt a smooth shine. It doesn't even come close to removing the old polish in an appreciable manner.

This is basically the same as using hair gel to remove old hair gel that has dried. Adding more to your hair will soften and liquefy the existing hair gel temporarily, but the amount of gel in your hair is still increasing, and at best you've just moved it around rather than removing it from your hair.
post #18529 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

This is plain wrong. I have formal training in chemistry and categorically say even if neutral polish has a greater composition of solvents by 2% (accounting for the absence of pigments, assuming the manufacturer hasn't added wax instead) will not be sufficient to dissolve hardened wax and draw it into a cloth.

Sure, if you rub vigorously the solvent in the wax will work to soften and dissolve the wax on the shoe (it can certainly disrupt the smoothness of a mirror shine) but will not take up the wax in a way that will strip the shoe of old wax.

Wax is a solid, and to remove it from the surface of a leather shoe you need to liquefy it (with solvent) to bring the solvent-wax mixture back into the cloth. Putting more wax on wax at best scrapes the surface to interrupt a smooth shine. It doesn't even come close to removing the old polish in an appreciable manner.

This is basically the same as using hair gel to remove old hair gel that has dried. Adding more to your hair will soften and liquefy the existing hair gel temporarily, but the amount of gel in your hair is still increasing, and at best you've just moved it around rather than removing it from your hair.

It works to remove polish, not hard layers of wax on a mirror shine. Like I said, try it. I have and it worked a charm. The basic idea is to use a higher concentration of solvent present in neutral wax paste.

Before you sprout off saying someone is wrong, maybe you can try finding out the composition of Saphir Neutral Wax. Since you have studied chemistry, I am sure you know the effect of adding more beeswax to a mixture, and the effect on the color of the paste. Hint: the color wont be neutral.
post #18530 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petepan View Post


It works to remove polish, not hard layers of wax on a mirror shine. Like I said, try it. I have and it worked a charm. The basic idea is to use a higher concentration of solvent present in neutral wax paste.

Before you sprout off saying someone is wrong, maybe you can try finding out the composition of Saphir Neutral Wax. Since you have studied chemistry, I am sure you know the effect of adding more beeswax to a mixture, and the effect on the color of the paste. Hint: the color wont be neutral.

:lurk:

post #18531 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post

From my experience if you use some conditioner like B4/lexol and little colour polish once in a while, you will never see any need to strip (acetone/renomat) old polish at all.  It will be enough if you brush your shoes ofently.

Thank you! Just like I thought. I won't use acetone or Renomat unless I notice a caked on wax. I usually follow the process I mentioned to get a mirror shine and make sure not to cake on polish.
post #18532 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by mirios View Post


Thank you! Just like I thought. I won't use acetone or Renomat unless I notice a caked on wax. I usually follow the process I mentioned to get a mirror shine and make sure not to cake on polish.

 

I think it is probably better to under clean/polish your shoes, rather than over clean/polish  them. Regular brushing - when you go out and when you come in - keep them in pretty good shape. 

post #18533 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I think it is probably better to under clean/polish your shoes, rather than over clean/polish  them. Regular brushing - when you go out and when you come in - keep them in pretty good shape. 

Yes sir, I brush more than I do anything else with regards to my shoes and boots. This,shoe trees, and dust bags.
Edited by dddrees - 7/12/16 at 9:41am
post #18534 of 19072

I'm getting some wear in the heel of my Alden LWB's - wondering what I can do to minimize/eliminate it...

post #18535 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I think it is probably better to under clean/polish your shoes, rather than over clean/polish  them. Regular brushing - when you go out and when you come in - keep them in pretty good shape. 


I agree but think that if you want a mirror shine you may need to polish perhaps in 6 months or a year. While brushing with a horse hair brush will buff and keep it relatively shiny if it rains or so that will dry the leather or so so I assume it's good practice to polish every 6 months to a year if you want the mirror shine. Don't you think?

In addition what about if you scuff your shoe in a certain area, what then? Wouldn't you want to treat the "affected" area with conditioner and layer in cream and wax polish. It seems that like skin if you scrap it you have to polish it to rebuild the layers back up again in that area. This is what happened to some black AE while in Amsterdam.
post #18536 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by mirios View Post


I agree but think that if you want a mirror shine you may need to polish perhaps in 6 months or a year. While brushing with a horse hair brush will buff and keep it relatively shiny if it rains or so that will dry the leather or so so I assume it's good practice to polish every 6 months to a year if you want the mirror shine. Don't you think?

In addition what about if you scuff your shoe in a certain area, what then? Wouldn't you want to treat the "affected" area with conditioner and layer in cream and wax polish. It seems that like skin if you scrap it you have to polish it to rebuild the layers back up again in that area. This is what happened to some black AE while in Amsterdam.

 

I don't know about mirror shines as I have never attempted them. Clearly, if you have a major scuff, you will want to deal with it. Again, I have found that a good brushing often heals things over. Otherwise some polish of the same colour will no doubt do the job. I'm not sure that you need 'layers' (unless you are talking about the mirror shine). In the end, you are bound to get some scuffing; they are shoes and made for wearing outside!  Most of them will disappear during your regular cleaning and polishing routine. Very best wishes, Munky.

post #18537 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I don't know about mirror shines as I have never attempted them. Clearly, if you have a major scuff, you will want to deal with it. Again, I have found that a good brushing often heals things over. Otherwise some polish of the same colour will no doubt do the job. I'm not sure that you need 'layers' (unless you are talking about the mirror shine). In the end, you are bound to get some scuffing; they are shoes and made for wearing outside!  Most of them will disappear during your regular cleaning and polishing routine. Very best wishes, Munky.
Completely agree! I was talking about a major scuff. Of course shoes depreciate over time that's what gives them their character IMO. This one was a major scuff I couldn't let stay without treatment.

You should try the mirror shines! I love it. It takes time but you don't need much wax polish at all you just alternate with that and water droplets and layer by layer it will mix (water and wax) to give you a mirror shine.
post #18538 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by mirios View Post


Completely agree! I was talking about a major scuff. Of course shoes depreciate over time that's what gives them their character IMO. This one was a major scuff I couldn't let stay without treatment.

You should try the mirror shines! I love it. It takes time but you don't need much wax polish at all you just alternate with that and water droplets and layer by layer it will mix (water and wax) to give you a mirror shine.

 

Yes! I think it is time for me to try the mirror shine. Your posting has reminded me of it!  Good luck with sorting out your scuff.  Thanks and best wishes, Munky. 

post #18539 of 19072
Quote:
 I'm getting some wear in the heel of my Alden LWB's - wondering what I can do to minimize/eliminate it...

Nylon heel taps or black Shoo Goo. Or both. You cannot minimize or elminate heel wear, but you can put something on top of the heel. That tap, goo, or both will wear down instead of the heel. When it wears out, you replace it. Much cheaper than replacing the heel toplift. But some people don't like the way these solutions work. If you are one of those people, then you are largely out of luck.

 

Some on here have suggested that one can use brass nails, relatively closely spaced, in the heel to slow down the wear. It probably helps some and most SF people would find it more attractive than the taps or Goo. 

post #18540 of 19072
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbhdnhdbh View Post

Nylon heel taps or black Shoo Goo. Or both. You cannot minimize or elminate heel wear, but you can put something on top of the heel. That tap, goo, or both will wear down instead of the heel. When it wears out, you replace it. Much cheaper than replacing the heel toplift. But some people don't like the way these solutions work. If you are one of those people, then you are largely out of luck.

Some on here have suggested that one can use brass nails, relatively closely spaced, in the heel to slow down the wear. It probably helps some and most SF people would find it more attractive than the taps or Goo. 

Or replace the rubber part of the heel top piece with a metal one a la Thom Browne



Could be slippery and / or noisy though
Edited by Chowkin - 7/13/16 at 6:24pm
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