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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1234

post #18496 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwMicInAus View Post

Hello there. I got food grease on my shoe today and wondered if it's possible to get it out. I have tried saphir renovateur but that didn't budge it. I guess I have to accept it as part of the patina. I appreciate your help if it's possible though. See pic

Renovateur wouldnt be possible to clean this!! If you have renomat use it (one-two really light passes) to remove old polish and open the pores of the leather! Then use distilled white vinegar (credits to Patrick booth on that) solution :

30ml vinegar(pasteurized/distilled)

70ml water(preferably distilled )

1ml lemon (i found that this helps greasy stains be diluted a lot faster) !! 

 

the other option is to use saddle soap but its quit harsh and then you have to use a lot different creams to restore ph and oils in the leather

post #18497 of 19045
Bought these G&G Oakhams a couple of years ago but never had a chance to wear them. Finally got round to launching their maiden voyage but to my horror found that the upper developed many tiny pimple like spots. Tried brushing them vigorously to no avail. Any idea how to get rid of them?

post #18498 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

Renovateur wouldnt be possible to clean this!! If you have renomat use it (one-two really light passes) to remove old polish and open the pores of the leather! Then use distilled white vinegar (credits to Patrick booth on that) solution :
30ml vinegar(pasteurized/distilled)
70ml water(preferably distilled )
1ml lemon (i found that this helps greasy stains be diluted a lot faster) !! 

the other option is to use saddle soap but its quit harsh and then you have to use a lot different creams to restore ph and oils in the leather
Much appreciated. I'll buy some Renomat and give it a go. Will let you know how it works out.
post #18499 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

Bought these G&G Oakhams a couple of years ago but never had a chance to wear them. Finally got round to launching their maiden voyage but to my horror found that the upper developed many tiny pimple like spots. Tried brushing them vigorously to no avail. Any idea how to get rid of them?

 

It always surprises me when people complain about the tiniest little imperfection. This happens with natural materials.

 

You can barely see them, stop worrying and enjoy the shoes.

post #18500 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by PParker ESQ View Post

It always surprises me when people complain about the tiniest little imperfection. This happens with natural materials.

You can barely see them, stop worrying and enjoy the shoes.

Thanks PParker. They were not there when I bought the shoes so was thinking I could somehow get rid of them. It has never happened with all my other shoes, G&G included.
post #18501 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

Two things that I have found useful in the last couple of years. First, if you are short for time in the morning, apply a thin coat of Saphir Creme Universelle Leather Balrm, to your shoes. It's liquid, goes on very easily and doesn't cause white patches in broguing. Have your shower and then brush!  It's all over in a few minutes. Second, when polishing brogue shoes, start the application of your cream in parts that are not brogued, e.g, bits either sides of the heel. Slowly work your way into the broguing. This method allows you to register how much polish you have on your rag, before moving into the trickier areas. The main point of it is the avoiding filling the holes with polish. These are my, unimpressive but useful, contributions to shoe care!  Yours, as always, Munky. 

 

An even shorter method!  Apply Saphir Creme Universelle and brush off straight away.  AFPOS recommend this, as follows: "Apply sparingly and polish immediately after application because of rapid solvent evaporation".  I've tried it and it works, although it leaves a slightly 'glassy' finish. Good in an emergency, though. 

 

I'm not completely convinced about the 'rapid solvent evaporation', though. My bottle of Universelle has a cap that won't close properly and thus leaves the contents open to the elements. The cream seems to be much the same as it ever was and the broken cap has been like this for a least a year. I would have thought that I should expect a lot of evaporation, but then, I am no expert. Kind regards, Munky

post #18502 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

Bought these G&G Oakhams a couple of years ago but never had a chance to wear them. Finally got round to launching their maiden voyage but to my horror found that the upper developed many tiny pimple like spots. Tried brushing them vigorously to no avail. Any idea how to get rid of them?


Any chance they are water spots? (i or from a trip to the lavatory)
post #18503 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post

Any chance they are water spots? (i or from a trip to the lavatory)

No, I just tried them on for a while in the office and then stored them in the box. The spots are not flat - when I run my finger across them I could feel them
post #18504 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

No, I just tried them on for a while in the office and then stored them in the box. The spots are not flat - when I run my finger across them I could feel them

I know of a possible solution but it is risky as that is a crust leather. You can use a blow dryer to heat the leather and by doing that you might be able to smooth out the spots. But as I said, due to it being a light colored crust leather, you run the risk of darkening the shoe.
post #18505 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Shoe Snob View Post

I know of a possible solution but it is risky as that is a crust leather. You can use a blow dryer to heat the leather and by doing that you might be able to smooth out the spots. But as I said, due to it being a light colored crust leather, you run the risk of darkening the shoe.

Thanks Justin. Do you know what caused them?
post #18506 of 19045

I don't know if it would be right to post in here but here it goes. 

 

After a lot of work I finally could get a nice mirror shine on my shoes. I tried a lot of times the general method, little bit of wax a drop of water and apply. I did get a shine but it was not as the ones I saw that some member got here. I do not have access to products like Saphir, the best products I could get here are Kiwi and a Santoni bees wax they gifted me when I bought my shoes. 

 

So I finally saw I video from @The Shoe Snob, if I remember correctly and boom, the shine came out. I did certain things different cause I don't know where to buy creams in here and usually the wax products are cream with wax so, I used as a cream a Collonil product I bought. I let it dry and buff with a cotton cloth. Then I started applying the wax, the first pass is with a generous amount of wax and one drop of water. I gave them a few passes, 2 or 3 trying to polish the selected part completely. Then I let them dry for 20 minutes and then with the beeswax I grab just a touch of it and a drop of water and try to aplly it a bit faster. With the first part I already got a nice shine, but that last step make them look like a mirror. I'm happy with the result. Some pics:

 

Santoni Dubmonks!

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Year Old Prada's (Click to show)

 

 

3 Year Old Cuadra's (Click to show)

 

 

1 Year Old Zampiere's (Click to show)

 

 

 

4 Year Old Cuadra Boots (Click to show)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santoni Chelsea's (Click to show)

 

 

4 Year Old Santoni's (Click to show)

 


Edited by Betelgeuse - 7/8/16 at 9:59am
post #18507 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

Bought these G&G Oakhams a couple of years ago but never had a chance to wear them. Finally got round to launching their maiden voyage but to my horror found that the upper developed many tiny pimple like spots. Tried brushing them vigorously to no avail. Any idea how to get rid of them?

They were not there when I bought the shoes so was thinking I could somehow get rid of them.

With all due respect, I'm not confidant you can trust a "couple of years ago" memory. We tend to overlook small problems when we get something new. Artists and Craftsman the world over rely on this simple fact of human nature.

That said, I am near-as-nevermind certain those aren't water spots. What they look like is specs of dirt/dust embedded in an acrylic finish or even perhaps in the wax of a glace' finish. I suppose this could even happen...although I can't, for the life of me, imagine how...after the fact--after you stuck them in the box and put them away. I suppose some dust could have "melted" into the wax over the space of several years esp. if they were in a warm place (again seems far-fetched but...).

First thing I'd do is...carefully, carefully...see if you can't scrape the specks off with your fingernail. If you can, chances are that's all you need to do...followed, of course, by some Saphir Reno, and a good brushing.

Other than that, ignore them--they're not visible from the highway.

edited for punctuation and clarity
Edited by DWFII - 7/8/16 at 8:43am
post #18508 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post

With all due respect, I not confidant you can trust a "couple of years ago" memory. We tend to overlook small problems when we get something new. Artists and Craftsman the world over rely on this simple fact of human nature.

That said, I am near-as-nevermind certain those aren't water spots. What they look like is specs of dirt/dust embedded in an acrylic finish or even perhaps in the wax of a glace' finish. I suppose this could even happen...although I can't, for the life of me, imagine how...after the fact--after you stuck them in the box and put them away. I suppose some dust could have "melted" into the wax over the space of several years esp. if they were in a warm place (again seems far-fetched but...).

First thing I'd do is...carefully, carefully...see if you can't scrape the specks off with your fingernail. If you can, chances are that's all you need to do...followed, of course, by some Saphir Reno, and a good brushing.

Other than that, ignore them--they're not visible from the highway.

Many thanks DWF. I'll heed your expert advice.
post #18509 of 19045
Quote:
Originally Posted by PParker ESQ View Post
 

 

It always surprises me when people complain about the tiniest little imperfection. This happens with natural materials.

 

You can barely see them, stop worrying and enjoy the shoes.

 

People buy GG shoes to not have to deal with this kind of stuff. If these spots were present when new they I think the shoes should've been marked as seconds. That leather quality on this price shoe is unacceptable, especially at the business end of a shoe. 

post #18510 of 19045
Hi All,

I just picked up a pair of Lanvin loafers and am wondering what kind of shoe tree I should be looking to use here, as my Woodlore Epics appear to tall in the forefoot and toe box for this model. Lanvin does not appear to sell lasted shoe trees, so I'm looking for something that accommodates a flat toe box, although this model has an interesting shape which I suppose might need to be accommodated as well.

Any input is appreciated.
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