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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1232

post #18466 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post
 

So how seriously bad is this tear in shell.  Its in the gusset that attaches the tongue to the side of the boot. 

 

 It looks pretty bad to me and likely to worsen if its around the gusset where you are going to stretch it more.

post #18467 of 19079
It was raining quite a bit in here in Stockholm last night. The first thing I did when I got home was to put shoetrees into my Allen edmonds abd wipe them with a dry cloth. When I checked my shoes today, I saw large black spots on them. I touches them and they felt very moist and almost cold. I put them in my drying cabinet for ~3 hours and they had not dissapeared. What should I do. [IMG]
post #18468 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by burnham View Post

It was raining quite a bit in here in Stockholm last night. The first thing I did when I got home was to put shoetrees into my Allen edmonds abd wipe them with a dry cloth. When I checked my shoes today, I saw large black spots on them. I touches them and they felt very moist and almost cold. I put them in my drying cabinet for ~3 hours and they had not dissapeared. What should I do. [IMG]
Another pic
post #18469 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by burnham View Post

Another pic

Never put shoe trees in a wet shoe. Let them air dry first and then insert trees. The dark spots are likely water stains. Try using a cleaner/conditioner like Renovateur.
post #18470 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Never put shoe trees in a wet shoe. Let them air dry first and then insert trees. The dark spots are likely water stains. Try using a cleaner/conditioner like Renovateur.
Don't have renovateur right now. Does renonat work equally as good?
post #18471 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by burnham View Post

Don't have renovateur right now. Does renonat work equally as good?

Renomat is meant as a cleaner and removes stains well. It also can strip the finish of shoe, and might be a little harsh for your task. Do you have other conditioner available?
post #18472 of 19079

I only have pommadier and some grease from saphir. Anyways, I applied renomat to the stains, replaced the shoetrees to newspaper and put them in the drying cabinet.

post #18473 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Never put shoe trees in a wet shoe. Let them air dry first and then insert trees.

Don't think I have heard that before. What damage can you cause by putting in shoe trees into wet shoes?
post #18474 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by Churchill W View Post


Don't think I have heard that before. What damage can you cause by putting in shoe trees into wet shoes?

 

The shoes won't dry completely with shoe trees in them. This is more for shoes that have been thoroughly soaked rather than some wetting from a light drizzle.

post #18475 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by PParker ESQ View Post


From what I know of this its generally in relation to a faulty pair that have been credited so they cant be resold. You normally see this with trainers and they cut the tongue off. My advice, abort abort abort.

Could also be from a thrift store. They don't tend to care where they put price and security tags.
post #18476 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

 

The shoes won't dry completely with shoe trees in them. This is more for shoes that have been thoroughly soaked rather than some wetting from a light drizzle.

 



...and depending on how tight your tress are, they could stretch the shoes.

When your shoes get wet (as opposed to just damp), you stuff them with newspaper and put them on their side, changing the newspaper when it is soaked through and continuing to do so until it isn't damp. I'll generally still give it another 12-24 hours after that before I insert trees, and several more days before I condition, etc.

Don't brush wet leather, and don't leave them near heat sources during the drying process - let an average room temperature do the work.

My $0.02.
post #18477 of 19079
For what it's worth:
I saturated a pair of shoes with water after stripping the finish. I then inserted shoe trees so they would maintain their shape as they dried. They turned out fine.
It probably does slow down the drying process. But if your priority is maintaining the shape of the shoe instead of the fastest drying time, it could be the way to go.
That's my two cents.
post #18478 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by burnham View Post
 

I only have pommadier and some grease from saphir. Anyways, I applied renomat to the stains, replaced the shoetrees to newspaper and put them in the drying cabinet.

 

If "drying cabinet" is your clothes dryer, stop doing that immediately, and stop applying products of any kind to the shoe. 

 

More than likely you've got water stains you've baked into the shoes at this point, but please take the trees out, stuff them loosely with newspaper and set them on their side in your closet away from heat.  Change the paper a couple times.   Let them dry for a day or two after that.  


Based on your photos, you're going to need some colored polish to cover the water stains.  I had a pair of shoes that got pretty wet, and from then on the stains would show up as dark spots whenever exposed to moisture.  Eventually I polished them with a darker color and used Saphir Invluner to "waterproof" them.  After a "rebuild", they're now my bad-weather beaters.  You can see before/after here:  http://imgur.com/a/gLepv

post #18479 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

For what it's worth:
I saturated a pair of shoes with water after stripping the finish. I then inserted shoe trees so they would maintain their shape as they dried. They turned out fine.
It probably does slow down the drying process. But if your priority is maintaining the shape of the shoe instead of the fastest drying time, it could be the way to go.
That's my two cents.


I've done the same to take the curve out of badly curves soles that were otherwise fine (i.e. plenty of life).  There were no issues, just have to be patient with the drying.

post #18480 of 19079
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post

If "drying cabinet" is your clothes dryer, stop doing that immediately, and stop applying products of any kind to the shoe. 

More than likely you've got water stains you've baked into the shoes at this point, but please take the trees out, stuff them loosely with newspaper and set them on their side in your closet away from heat.  Change the paper a couple times.   Let them dry for a day or two after that.  


Based on your photos, you're going to need some colored polish to cover the water stains.  I had a pair of shoes that got pretty wet, and from then on the stains would show up as dark spots whenever exposed to moisture.  Eventually I polished them with a darker color and used Saphir Invluner to "waterproof" them.  After a "rebuild", they're now my bad-weather beaters.  You can see before/after here:  http://imgur.com/a/gLepv

Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

For what it's worth:
I saturated a pair of shoes with water after stripping the finish. I then inserted shoe trees so they would maintain their shape as they dried. They turned out fine.
It probably does slow down the drying process. But if your priority is maintaining the shape of the shoe instead of the fastest drying time, it could be the way to go.
That's my two cents.
Okay so before I went to bed last night I had a look at my shoes. They were stuffed with newspapers but they made them lose their shape. So I replaced them with shoetrees, put them on their sides on a bookshelf and then I went to bed. Woke up around one hour ago and this is how the most saturated shoe looked like




Does this look good?
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