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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1219

post #18271 of 19073
The old style cotton diapers work wonders if you ask me. I've been using them for a couple of decades now.
post #18272 of 19073
For Allen Edmonds shoes, I know the AE Leather Conditioner has been known to take off some of the burnishing on their shoes, has anyone had a similar experience using the AE brand leather lotion?

I just got a pair of AE shoes in Dark Chili. I took out the laces and hit them with a moderate amount of leather lotion. Something I've done in the past with previous shoes before wearing them.

For some reason, between the laces and cap toe, it looks like the burnishing has come off.
post #18273 of 19073
Hello Everyone,

I was hoping if anyone can give me advice to try to reverse what i stupidly did to one of my shoes (burnished brown AE park avenues)

Long story short i used a blow dryer to try to get a stubborn crease out from the right side shoe. The location of the crease was on the rear right just below the heel counter (a door with a metal bottom panel closed behind me and the metal ledge dug into the shoe, creasing it)

As a result of the blow drying, I did it from (4-5 inches away and never held it in a single spot going back and forth quickly).., the crease is now out but the leather is more nappy than the rest of the shoe and does not feel as smooth to the touch. Furthermore it is also darker than the rest of the burnished brown and this is very apparent in sun light frown.gif

I have tried to address the issue by spot cleaning it .. first trying to strip the area with Saphir Renomat followed by Saphir Renovatur, Collonil Coca brown Colour shoe cream, then finally waxing with mahogany Saphir wax paste. (Waiting 15-20 minutes between each step and brushing with a horse hair brush before starting the next...)

The result of this process did not help to lighten the shoe and the darkened area is still quite visible compared to the rest of the shoe. The shoe is still a bit nappy but felt a little smoother than before, still not comparable to original AE finish. I was hoping the Renomat would help bring the darkened leather part back to its original color but this did not happen to be the case :S

Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Please see album here for what the shoe looks like now : https://goo.gl/photos/sK5b7dSvhKccraDKA

Thanks!
Edited by Kyle753 - 5/11/16 at 6:51am
post #18274 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post


I can assure you, you don't know what you're talking about.

  Some things that i happen to know for sure about that matter!! The ShoeSP are rebranded Saphir(Avel) 100%!! Avel tend to make polish(rebrand her products for them)  so to take advantage of their name for advertising reasons(John lobb's old polish was rebranded Saphir, i am not sure 100% about the current one )  (a product with English name will sell much better than a French named product in UK's market , especially to people that "just want to buy a good polish" and dont have the knowledge )!

 

  Also AE polish in the past was rebranded Collonil(now they claim that they make it )! As you can imagine a US named product will sell much better that a German made in US market! Simple advertising reasons and the fact that any big company want to sell product with their firm on it(marketing reasons) !

 

  I hope i helped a little bit :happy:

post #18275 of 19073

Cross post...

 

New pair of C&J for BB (brown shell cordovan). Left shoe MUCH shinier than right (I wonder if someone mixed and matched before making a return). What's the simplest way to shine up the right shoe to make a better match?

post #18276 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosy View Post
 

Cross post...

 

New pair of C&J for BB (brown shell cordovan). Left shoe MUCH shinier than right (I wonder if someone mixed and matched before making a return). What's the simplest way to shine up the right shoe to make a better match?

Use your breath closely to the surface then brush with a soft horse hair brush and this ll soften the waxes in the leather and bring up a shine! Else you can go with a tiny bit of wax or renovateur!

post #18277 of 19073

 

Is the crease on the right shoe's cap toe normal? The shoes are 1-2 months old. I usually see shoes crease past the cap toe, but not on the cap toe itself.

post #18278 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sushi View Post
 

 

Is the crease on the right shoe's cap toe normal? The shoes are 1-2 months old. I usually see shoes crease past the cap toe, but not on the cap toe itself. 

There are some shoemakers which do not use a toe puff which goes the entire length of the toe cap.  Vass for instance is one of them. When they don't you'll see creasing such as this.

post #18279 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post
 

There are some shoemakers which do not use a toe puff which goes the entire length of the toe cap.  Vass for instance is one of them. When they don't you'll see creasing such as this.


These are Allen Edmonds. Should I consider this a defect and try to return them or is this expected?

post #18280 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sushi View Post
 

 

Is the crease on the right shoe's cap toe normal? The shoes are 1-2 months old. I usually see shoes crease past the cap toe, but not on the cap toe itself. Those are normal creases IMO.

Are those a bit short for your feet?.  If not, maybe the toe cap is a bit elongated for the pattern.

post #18281 of 19073

A few questions, for the experts:

 

Went to my shoe cobbler yesterday to have a pair of shoes resoled for the first time (goodyear welt). A few things bothered me. It was clear that he wanted to glue the new sole on without stitching it. That was a nonstarter.

 

1. Doesn't the stitching have to go through the gemming to keep the shape of the last? 

 

So, they are going to keep the heel on and then put a new sole on the worn part, stitching it on but leaving the end part of the current sole and the heel. I suppose I should have asked for both to be replaced so the whole sole would be stitched on. But the idea of cutting the worn part off and restitching only a portion of new leather seemed odd. I would have thought the stitching should go around the entire shoe to have structural integrity.

 

2. So, does the proposed resoling even make sense to do while keeping the integrity of the shoe?

 

It certainly seems less than ideal, but the guys there have been in business for a long time, and clearly have settled on certain ways of doing things. 

 

Experts, your thoughts would be greatly valued.

post #18282 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by TweedyProf View Post

A few questions, for the experts:

...

The welt is sewn to the gemmiing, the outsole is sewn to the welt. So, no the gemming is not a factor in a resole unless it has come loose from the insole...partially or extensively.

It sounds like the cobbler is offering a half-sole. In which case if it is sewn, the stitching will go all around the shoe (where there is welt). Part of that will be the old stitching but the new should overlap.

The only drawback to the halfsole is the splice--ideally behind the tread line/ tread area in the waist. It would benefit from being anchored with brass nails. But generally speaking most most cobblers and most halfsoles rely on cement to secure the splice.

--
Edited by DWFII - 5/10/16 at 6:30am
post #18283 of 19073
Here's a video on a half sole replacement:

http://youtu.be/DR5yogwrItg

@DWFII - would a half sole replacement be better than a full sole one since there is smaller disturbance to the shoe?
Edited by Chowkin - 5/10/16 at 6:15am
post #18284 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post


@DWFII - would a half sole replacement be better than a full sole one since there is smaller disturbance to the shoe?

On certain types of footwear, I'd have to say "yes" although probably not significantly better. If the heel seat...and esp. the heel stack...is nailed with iron, all that is potentially a problem when it is ripped out. So anytime you can leave the heel stack in place is usually less destructive.
post #18285 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowkin View Post

Here's a video on a half sole replacement:

http://youtu.be/DR5yogwrItg

@DWFII - would a half sole replacement be better than a full sole one since there is smaller disturbance to the shoe?

I hate 1/2 soles. I wouldn't put them on my own shoes so I wouldn't use them on a customer's shoes.
In this case the stitches should have been pulled from the top of the welt not the bottom. This way you are ensuring that no fragments are left behind unpicked. Also the cork wasn't even touched let alone removed and replaced. You can see when the original sole was removed some of the cork stuck to the underside of the sole. At the very least the cork should have been patched but I don't like the idea of patching. Better than nothing though.....
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