or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1213

post #18181 of 19073
Edoya sheep hair brushes back in stock at Leather Soul. Get them before they're sold out!

http://leathersoul.com/2016/04/18/edoya-kawadamashii-restock-lsw-2/
post #18182 of 19073

Hi all,

newbie here, hope someone can help...

 

A while ago (when I knew even less about leathers than now) I bought a second reserve pair of some favourite rugged hiking-style boots in a different colour, with the upper featuring a "rough-cut"/semi-nubuck type leather.

 

Not knowing any better,, before storing I conditioned them with a cream; resulting in the finish of the upper transforming into a nasty plastic-looking mess.

 

Can anyone please let me know if there is any type of solution I can use to strip the cream out so I can recondition with a spray instead.

 

Many thanks.

post #18183 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlithyButler View Post
 

Hi all,

newbie here, hope someone can help...

 

A while ago (when I knew even less about leathers than now) I bought a second reserve pair of some favourite rugged hiking-style boots in a different colour, with the upper featuring a "rough-cut"/semi-nubuck type leather.

 

Not knowing any better,, before storing I conditioned them with a cream; resulting in the finish of the upper transforming into a nasty plastic-looking mess.

 

Can anyone please let me know if there is any type of solution I can use to strip the cream out so I can recondition with a spray instead.

 

Many thanks.

Mixture of rubbing alcohol and nail polish remover (acetone) will work. Saphir Renomat should also work. Any volatile organic solvent will do the trick. 

post #18184 of 19073

Ah, brilliant - thanks so much.

post #18185 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlithyButler View Post
 

Ah, brilliant - thanks so much.

 

Be careful though, as it may dry out the leather. If these are tough and rugged boots as you say, might be worth putting some boot oil on them after. Put your solvent of choice on a cloth and gently pass over the area in question. It should come up onto the cloth with a few passes and force if need be. 

post #18186 of 19073

I was intending to re-condition them immediately with a "water-based" nubuck conditioner/protector (Zamberlan); if this would not be adequate can you please let me know a suitable brand of oil that you mention

 

Thanks again

post #18187 of 19073
What product if any does everyone use to condition their suede shoes?
post #18188 of 19073

I give new shoes a light coat of waterproofer.

After much wear, I use Saphir Suede Renovateur when the shoes no longer respond to a brushing.

post #18189 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlithyButler View Post
 

Hi all,

newbie here, hope someone can help...

 

A while ago (when I knew even less about leathers than now) I bought a second reserve pair of some favourite rugged hiking-style boots in a different colour, with the upper featuring a "rough-cut"/semi-nubuck type leather.

 

Not knowing any better,, before storing I conditioned them with a cream; resulting in the finish of the upper transforming into a nasty plastic-looking mess.

 

Can anyone please let me know if there is any type of solution I can use to strip the cream out so I can recondition with a spray instead.

 

Many thanks.


It may help to know what conditioning cream you used.  I am no expert, but I think I would try a suede/nubuck shampoo like Saphir Omni'Nettoyant before trying alcohol or acetone.  

post #18190 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by dddrees View Post

What product if any does everyone use to condition their suede shoes?

I norrmally brush suede like calf, but sometimes I mix water with any coconut oiled shampoo and apply it with a sponge to clean and condition it.

post #18191 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by ace13x View Post
 


It may help to know what conditioning cream you used.  I am no expert, but I think I would try a suede/nubuck shampoo like Saphir Omni'Nettoyant before trying alcohol or acetone.  

 

Hi,

the cream is also "Hydro-Bloc" by Zamberlan (an Italian manufacturer of superb quality hiking boots) - it is dense, made for thick/rugged leather and as the name suggests with the emphasis being on water repellence.

 

Thanks for another Saphir recommendation.

post #18192 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlithyButler View Post
 

 

Hi,

the cream is also "Hydro-Bloc" by Zamberlan (an Italian manufacturer of superb quality hiking boots) - it is dense, made for thick/rugged leather and as the name suggests with the emphasis being on water repellence.

 

Thanks for another Saphir recommendation.


No problem.  There is a video somewhere of some using the Saphir shampoo (Omni'Nettoyant) out there, you may want to look at it before you buy.  Sorry I don't have a link.

post #18193 of 19073

When getting a shoe resoled, is it possible to have the last changed as well? (would be done by the original maker of the shoe)

post #18194 of 19073

I doubt it: even if you removed the whole welt and insole, the counter and toe puff are set and moulded to the upper.  I guess you could soak and re-shape the same upper over a slightly different last over some time, but it would have to be extremely close in shape for the pattern to even nearly fit, and I don't see a way around that counter and toe puff issue without ridiculous destruction.

 

This is Styleforum.  The answer is to buy more shoes. 

post #18195 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by venividivicibj View Post

When getting a shoe resoled, is it possible to have the last changed as well? (would be done by the original maker of the shoe)

This would be a case where the risk is not worth the reward....
There are to many measurements and dimension that go into lasting a shoe and getting the pieces to fit and line up correctly. Trying to re-last a shoe on a different last is as time consuming (maybe more) than making a shoe from scratch. Aside from them not fitting right, they won't look right either. You also may wind up with one dimension feeling and looking right but, somewhere-else creasing -or- bulging will likely occur.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**