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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1212

post #18166 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post
 
Originally Posted by Soupy View Post
 

Knowledgeable gentlemen of the Shoe Care thread, I have a question about the behavior of light colored leather creasing and darkening. Below is a photo taken in sunlight of a pair of Allen Edmonds Flatirons in Walnut calf. I am not the original owner so I do not know their care history, just that they came heavily creased. I don't mind creasing and know it is a natural part of wearing shoes, however the dark color in these creases makes them significantly more prominent than with my other Walnut Strands from Allen Edmonds. Can you see how there is a lot of black or otherwise not-Walnut coloration across much of the toes and vamp? Particularly in the creases between the medallion and the laces.

 

I have tried a variety of products but generally with light applications because I wasn't sure what might help and what might hurt. Between each product application I waited 24 hours to ensure the shoes were "dry" from the previous attempt when necessary. I've tried Saphir Reno'Mat, Lexol Conditioner, Allen Edmonds Conditioner / Cleaner, and Meltonian Brown cream. My gut thinks it's either leather that is actually stripped of dye, but then I would have expected the Meltonian to have a bigger effect, or it is left over (dark) polish from the previous owner but I would have thought the Reno'mat or other products would have taken care of this. Again, I only used the Reno'Mat and the Meltonian in light amounts so if directed I could certainly use them more liberally. For what it's worth, the leather still feels healthy and nowhere near cracking or significant damage. Any direction would be greatly appreciated!

 


I had a pair of walnut Flatirons. The smooth leather just seems to show the creases a little more. It could be that they were brushed with the same brush that was used on dark shoes, and that embedded the darker color in the creases. I don't think that you can remove it.
I loved my Flatirons, but after polishing them I decided that they would look even better if they were a little darker. So I dyed them.

 

Incredible results! I will certainly consider embracing a darker look and using some darker creams, but you do make me wonder if it was something as simple as "brush contamination" and if some more thorough use of Reno'Mat might help. I suppose the worst case could be if I actually do strip the walnut coloring and then have to apply dye and/or cream. Thanks for the input and inspiration, your Flatirons are gorgeous!

post #18167 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sushi View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by NeyZan View Post


Just keep Trying you are in the right path...

 

Thanks for the words of encouragement and inspirational photos :) I definitely spent more than one hour on one shoe, but I've read that first time shine usually takes longer. Plus, I'm sure I still have a lot of work to do on my technique. One thing I'm not sure about is whether I should let it rest in between the polishes. Let's say I do a dab of polish and a drop of water and polish for 2-3 min with adding more water once or twice. Should I continue with more polish after that or let the layer solidify first?


I don't let it dry, just keep applying minimum amounts of wax & water/spit everytime I consider necessary (experience will tell you this) but every few minutes you can add wax and keep layering and polishing (remember you should rise the wax temperature with the polishing cloth/circles so the wax melts and cristalize)
post #18168 of 19233

I was looking into conditioner/cleaners that use orange oil as the solvent, and come across two:

 

1) http://glenkarencare.com/

2) http://www.petripolish.com/

 

GlenKaren is a SF member's product, so there's a thread here about it, but there hasn't been any discussion regarding it in about a year now. 

 

Petri Polish is a very similar product, and is also a small operation (one person I believe), though Rancourt actually stocks it. I couldn't find any reviews or discussion about it, and the blog hasn't seen activity in about a year as well.

 

Anyway, what do you guys think of these products?

post #18169 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasfunke View Post

I was looking into conditioner/cleaners that use orange oil as the solvent, and come across two:

1) http://glenkarencare.com/
2) http://www.petripolish.com/

GlenKaren is a SF member's product, so there's a thread here about it, but there hasn't been any discussion regarding it in about a year now. 

Petri Polish is a very similar product, and is also a small operation (one person I believe), though Rancourt actually stocks it. I couldn't find any reviews or discussion about it, and the blog hasn't seen activity in about a year as well.

Anyway, what do you guys think of these products?

I used orange oil as a pure solvent to remove the old wax from a nice pair of calf dress shoes. The oil absorbed into the leather and ruined the toe of the shoes. Further, orange oil is FAR from a good solvent. While it certainly smells nice, I've left the bottle of orange oil open in my bedroom for about 3 months now and seen negligible evaporation. I assure you that acetone, rubbing alcohol, or maybe even turpentine, would be evaporated overnight.

Stay away from orange oil, I learned the hard way.
post #18170 of 19233
Orange oil as a solvent means wax and pigment particles are dissolved in orange oil.

But orange oil is definitely not a volatile enough liquid to be used as a cleaner.
post #18171 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

Orange oil as a solvent means wax and pigment particles are dissolved in orange oil.

But orange oil is definitely not a volatile enough liquid to be used as a cleaner.

Yup, I know what a solvent is wink.gif agreed it's not volatile enough for a cleaner. I suggest staying away from it because it can very quickly soak leather and ruin it.
post #18172 of 19233
Just a thought...FWIW...every polish, every conditioner, and nearly every shoe care product on the market has both a solvent in it as well as some sort of oils--from turpentine to naptha to benzene to acetone to hogs fat to mink oil to mineral oil to silicone oil to coconut oil. Every single one of these has a downside--from environmental impacts to personal health damage to residues left in the leather to critical agents being removed from the leather. If we used any of these at full concentration on our shoes the results would likely be as damaging as with the orange oil. Even acetone...which is a common ingredient in strippers can damage the leather...as well as your own health.

I'm not advocating orange oil or any chemical but short of some very simple products that don't try to change the nature of the leather as it comes from the tanner or currier, it's pick your poison.

--
Edited by DWFII - 4/21/16 at 5:58am
post #18173 of 19233
My left foot is slightly larger than my right foot. Maybe about a half size.
I've got a pair of loafers that fit my right (smaller) foot pretty good. The left shoe is slightly short. It's a size 13, and the next bigger size is a 14 -- which is way too big for my other foot.
How much improvement in length could I expect from shoe stretching? An 1/8"? A 1/4"?
(The shoes in question are the Allen Edmonds Stowe loafer.)
post #18174 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

My left foot is slightly larger than my right foot. Maybe about a half size.
I've got a pair of loafers that fit my right (smaller) foot pretty good. The left shoe is slightly short. It's a size 13, and the next bigger size is a 14 -- which is way too big for my other foot.
How much improvement in length could I expect from shoe stretching? An 1/8"? A 1/4"?
(The shoes in question are the Allen Edmonds Stowe loafer.)

If there is no toe stiffener or heel stiffener..and many loafers are made like that...you might be able to stretch them @1/4", with only minimal distortion and probably no real discomfort.
post #18175 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreams99 View Post

My left foot is slightly larger than my right foot. Maybe about a half size.
I've got a pair of loafers that fit my right (smaller) foot pretty good. The left shoe is slightly short. It's a size 13, and the next bigger size is a 14 -- which is way too big for my other foot.
How much improvement in length could I expect from shoe stretching? An 1/8"? A 1/4"?
(The shoes in question are the Allen Edmonds Stowe loafer.)

 

Contact AE and ask for 13/14 separately, if they dont have size 13.5.

 

Loafers stretch and you do need tight instep fit to prevent from being slippers/flip flops.

post #18176 of 19233
I have a pair of suede AEs where the suede has cracked, for lack of a better term, at the stress points on each shoe. Because of the crack I can see through to what I believe is the sock liner.

I am going to take them to my shoe guy to see if he can fix them, but anyone have suggestions on how to avoid this problem in the future. This isn't my first pair of suede shoes, but it is the first time this has ever happened.
post #18177 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoomDiggs View Post

I have a pair of suede AEs where the suede has cracked, for lack of a better term, at the stress points on each shoe. Because of the crack I can see through to what I believe is the sock liner.

I am going to take them to my shoe guy to see if he can fix them, but anyone have suggestions on how to avoid this problem in the future. This isn't my first pair of suede shoes, but it is the first time this has ever happened.

How old are they? I'd contact AE, too. 

post #18178 of 19233
Hey all,

Wanted to get some opinions on what to do about this. I noticed this a few days ago. It looks like the channeling has worn down to the stitching. Should I get a topy or just have the sole replaced?

post #18179 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by aglose View Post

Hey all,

Wanted to get some opinions on what to do about this. I noticed this a few days ago. It looks like the channeling has worn down to the stitching. Should I get a topy or just have the sole replaced?

 

I'd say there's a decent amount of wear left in those soles if only the channel-covering flap has worn down

post #18180 of 19233
Quote:
Originally Posted by sleepyinsanfran View Post
 

 

I'd say there's a decent amount of wear left in those soles if only the channel-covering flap has worn down

 

I agree. Normal practice for sole replacement is when the sole feels "spongy" or soft. 

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