or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1207

post #18091 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darell John View Post

Gents? Reposting because I have received any replies yet.

Some additional information. I was caught in a sudden storm. So the marks were left by just rain nothing else, it's been About a month now the darkened area is still there, has not gone down yet.

I found some info of dealing with water stains on regular leather but was wondering if the treatment of shell cordovan is different.

FYI, shoes are park Ave, AE. In natural shell.
If that makes any difference.

Stains like this on lighter shoes is usually a sign of the leather reacting to a higher pH than it was intended for. Most leather wants to be in a range of between 3-5. Vegetable tanned leather (like shell) probably on the lower end of that spectrum. Water being somewhere around neutral will lead marks because the leather almost acts like litmus paper. I suggest mixing 1/3 white vinegar with 2/3 distilled water and give it some elbow grease with it. Let it dry thoroughly. If it is still there try it one more time. Still there? You may have to wet a piece of paper towel wit the solution and literally stick it to the shoe and then wrap it in saran wrap to control some of the evaporation. Let it sit like that for several hours (up to a couple days sometimes). Then peel the paper towel off, which should be crispy-dry. This usually will usually help lighten the shoes up again. Polishing will even out the color. Good luck.
post #18092 of 19038
Guys,


What should I do? Pair of alden longwings have a small crack. Not sure if it's the actual leather or the top layer of finish. It has not spread any since I noticed it. I do regular mantinence on these and always use shoe trees

Help!
post #18093 of 19038
Not much you can do if you take care of them regularly. If you want to cover it up some cream polish would do the trick, but if it is the leather splitting there isn't much you can do besides wear them until they are unwearable.
post #18094 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Processed By eBay with ImageMagick, z1.1.0. ||B2

 

 

What products can I use on this shiny/corrected grain(?)/bookbinder(??) leather?

 

Would conditioners like Lexol and Bick4 penetrate at all, or does this kind of leather have essentially a plastic coating on it?  All my other shoes are straight calf leather, so I have no experience of the shiny stuff.

 

What about my usual Saphir creams and waxes - would they work on this stuff?

 

I think these shoes date from the ealy 1990s so they would appreciate some TLC.

I have been told that although it is minimal, there is still some level of absorption happening through bookbinder leather.  So, I apply a small amount of some nourishing cream on my bookbinder leather shoes (The usual Saphir stuff like the Polish Lotion Saphir Medaille D'or or else would work).

 

Varnish Rife Liquid Saphir has given me the best results as far as reviving the shine of bookbinder leather and as preventing it from cracking is concerned.  So I'd recommend it for bookbinder leather.

 

Since it is leather too, I maintain the inside of all my shoes with the Protective Oil Saphir HP and it has worked well for me.

post #18095 of 19038
I'd be careful about using Protective Oil Saphir HP on the insides of shoes. You're essentially waterproofing the leather and removing any absorption properties it has. Also, I would think it would make your feet sweat more and more moisture inside the shoe with no means of escaping when trees are in there could mean mold growth and such. I would use an emulsified conditioner to keep the leather supple, but not overwhelm the pores to allow natural breathability to remain in tact.
post #18096 of 19038

I work on the principle that corrected grain can't absorb anything to speak of. I wipe them down after wearing them. Every so often I put a really tiny bit of Renapur on them to give them a bit of a shine. A tub of Renapur should last you a lifetime and you don't really need to rub or brush it off.

 

I have used Lexol on the inside of one pair of CG shoes. I think the placebo effect is working overtime as I think they feel more comfortable. It was an experiment,though, and I don't plan to do it again. 

post #18097 of 19038

Thanks for the comments regarding these corrected grain shoes.

 

I tried a small amount of Bick4 conditioner on the inside of these, especially around the vamp area. 

 

I got these Barkers for less than £20 on eBay so I wasn't expecting much to be honest.  It turns out they are a really good fit for me.  The only downside so far is that the cemented sole feels pretty thin (4 or 5mm?) so you feel more of the pavement than normal.  Still, decent beaters for the price!

post #18098 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

I'd be careful about using Protective Oil Saphir HP on the insides of shoes. You're essentially waterproofing the leather and removing any absorption properties it has. Also, I would think it would make your feet sweat more and more moisture inside the shoe with no means of escaping when trees are in there could mean mold growth and such. I would use an emulsified conditioner to keep the leather supple, but not overwhelm the pores to allow natural breathability to remain in tact.


I've been doing this on my shoes for several years and i have not noticed any detrimental effect like mold or felt like increased perspiration.  But, you make a good point.  I will monitor this closely.  Thanks!

post #18099 of 19038

Where do Carlos Santos shoes fit into the scheme of things?  I can't find out much about them. 

post #18100 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Where do Carlos Santos shoes fit into the scheme of things?  I can't find out much about them. 

See here:

http://www.styleforum.net/t/312954/carlos-santos-shoes-feedback-appreciation#post_8307630
post #18101 of 19038

Thank you very much for this link, Chowkin. I realise that I may already have a pair of CS shoes - Herring Chaucer 11s. To this relatively untrained eye, they are beautifully made and very comfortable to wear. 

 

I note, with amusement, that there seems to be more fighting and falling out in the site you sent me, than on this one. I didn't know that was possible!  Many thanks, Munky.

post #18102 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

Stains like this on lighter shoes is usually a sign of the leather reacting to a higher pH than it was intended for. Most leather wants to be in a range of between 3-5. Vegetable tanned leather (like shell) probably on the lower end of that spectrum. Water being somewhere around neutral will lead marks because the leather almost acts like litmus paper. I suggest mixing 1/3 white vinegar with 2/3 distilled water and give it some elbow grease with it. Let it dry thoroughly. If it is still there try it one more time. Still there? You may have to wet a piece of paper towel wit the solution and literally stick it to the shoe and then wrap it in saran wrap to control some of the evaporation. Let it sit like that for several hours (up to a couple days sometimes). Then peel the paper towel off, which should be crispy-dry. This usually will usually help lighten the shoes up again. Polishing will even out the color. Good luck.

Thanks Patrick, your opinions are always valued.
Makes sense to me, let me have a test and see how it works.
Fingers crossed!
post #18103 of 19038

Guys, I need some help. I got caught in the rain and my brand new pair of Museum Calf shoes got some water bumps on them on the captoe. I've treated them twice with Saphir Renovator but haven't seen too much improvement in the bumps. Advice? I'm thinking of stripping the polish down to the leather and going from there. Please advise folks! 

post #18104 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Guys, I need some help. I got caught in the rain and my brand new pair of Museum Calf shoes got some water bumps on them on the captoe. I've treated them twice with Saphir Renovator but haven't seen too much improvement in the bumps. Advice? I'm thinking of stripping the polish down to the leather and going from there. Please advise folks! 

I would let them dry (out of their bags) for a few days first, if you haven't done so already.
post #18105 of 19038
I'll let the experts weigh-in, but from what I read when I discovered water damage on my calf-skin shoes is that the water/vinegar remedy detailed by Patrick at the top of this page is your best bet.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**