or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1198

post #17956 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by ext23 View Post
 

i am just setting foot (...lol) into the world of nice leather shoes. my various pairs are black, brown and white, and i also need to take care of the leather seat on my bicycle, and the saphir neutral creme is what the old guy at the local shoe repair store recommended.

 

is there any point me paying another $20 for the renovateur, or is the simple creme enough? obviously i don't want anything that's gonna darken my white sneakers.

 

It is probably best to get black and brown creams for you shoes of those colours. Cream polish is fine and you could use Renovateur very occasionally. Bear in mind that you only need to use the products in very small amounts and not very often, so the jars you buy will last a long time. Very regular brushing is all you need for most of the time.  I don't know how to look after white shoes. 

 

More than half a lifetime ago, I used to cycle race and I used some sort of oil on the saddle but I can't remember the details. Obviously, you have to use something that won't come off on your clothes. I don't remember using anything much on the saddle and - if I did - only very, very, occasionally. The alternative is to get a plastic saddle They can be excellent. Yours, Munky

post #17957 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

It is probably best to get black and brown creams for you shoes of those colours. Cream polish is fine and you could use Renovateur very occasionally. Bear in mind that you only need to use the products in very small amounts and not very often, so the jars you buy will last a long time. Very regular brushing is all you need for most of the time.  I don't know how to look after white shoes. 

 

More than half a lifetime ago, I used to cycle race and I used some sort of oil on the saddle but I can't remember the details. Obviously, you have to use something that won't come off on your clothes. I don't remember using anything much on the saddle and - if I did - only very, very, occasionally. The alternative is to get a plastic saddle They can be excellent. Yours, Munky

I'm glad you followed up with the saddle advice, I started having visions of a man dismounting with a brown stained bottom.

post #17958 of 19044
I managed to screw up this pair of JM Westons.

IMG_1037.JPG 1517k .JPG file

I went through my normal polish routine and then I thought I would add a little shine to the toe but my towel was too wet and now the right shoe (left in the picture) seems to be missing color.

This shoe came with a distressed look to it where the leather is lighter in choice spots but this is a bit too much and I don't have what I need to fix it seems as the JM Weston creme polish isn't dark enough and the Saphir dark brown is slightly better but still not giving me the result I need. How can I fix this?
post #17959 of 19044
You
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirWilliam View Post

How can I fix this?

How about doing the same trick to make the other toe lighter?
post #17960 of 19044
Hopefully this is the right thread for this question. I just re-dyed some suede shoes. Any suggestions on how to keep the color from fainting rubbing off on things that contact the shoes?
post #17961 of 19044

Hi could I get some pointers on my shoe care routine? I've just recently got myself a pair of UK 7.5 Tan Conistons from Crockett & Jones, these are my first pair of proper shoes as I've been wearing sneakers most of the time and I really would love care for my shoes the right way. After going through the shoe care thread I've gotten myself 2 cream pommadier cream polish, one black and one medium brown,1 pate lux wax polish, 1 renovator cream and a UK 7 size shoe tree all from Saphir. I've read that I should polish them after every 5-8 wears is that correct? Do I need to apply the renovator cream everything I polish them? Also would it be better if I use a neutral cream for my Tan Conistons or the medium brown? Would it be correct to have 3 separate applicator brush for all 3 polish cream and would it be okay if I use my polishing brush to both brush off dirt and for polishing? I have attached some pictures of the current state of my shoe, are the creases normal after just 6-7 wears or are my shoe trees too small for my boots? Also I think I kinda messed up as I was walking to school and kicked the side the pavement and scuffed the sole edge, is there anything I could do to make it look new again? Apologies for bombarding everyone with my questions.

 

post #17962 of 19044

Lovely boots!  They are on my wish list.

 

Neutral cream would keep the original colour but it wouldn't hide any scuffs.  From Saphir, you might want to consider the Cognac shade.

 

Regarding the sole edge, I would recomwnd you gat a Saphie edge dressing in the correct shade:

 

http://www.afinepairofshoes.co.uk/products/saphir-renovating-cream-edge-dressing-25ml?utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=googlepla&gclid=COX-6pCSzcsCFYpAGwodUBkAoQ

 

It comes out like a thick cream and you just need a thin smear around the edge to hide that scuff.

post #17963 of 19044

Congratulations on your buying such beautiful boots, Myo! There is a lot written about shoe care in these pages and quite a few summaries. I will give a brief list of points to bear in mind.

 

- Don't forget shoe trees; put them in for all the time your feet aren't in your shoes. Your shoe trees should be snug and not loose. 

- Don't wear the same pair of shoes two days running. Perhaps buy another, less expensive shoes, to allow you to rotate the wearing. 

- Keep a separate brush for dusting off and brushing after polishing. 

- Polish your shoes when they need them and not to a particular routine

- Use Renovateur about every two or three months - again, if the shoes need it.

- Use cream polish that is the same colour as your shoes

- If you want a brighter shine, use wax after you have applied and polished off cream

- The scuff is no big problem as shoes do get knocked around a bit.  If you want to, you can apply the edge dressing that English suggests, above. My own experience with it is that it gives a slightly artificial look to the sole edges. Be careful not to use it after a night on the town! You need a steady hand.

- Overall, brushing is the best way to keep your shoes looking good. Try not to over-polish them. If in doubt, leave the polishing alone and just keep brushing!

 

These are just my observations, mostly gleaned from this thread. As you will have noticed, the motto of the thread is 'less is more'.

 

Best wishes, Munky.

post #17964 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post

You
How about doing the same trick to make the other toe lighter?
I could but I don't really care for the look.
post #17965 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoesShoesShoes View Post




Hi all, hoping some for help or direction please. I have these Trickers Grasmere which were used, when I obtained them -  both boots had these black marks at over the toes. They also have similar marks over the ankles.  I was hoping to strip down the polish and see if it might be possible to stripout whatever was causing the marks, so I applied Saphir renomat and this is what I have now:



This isn't really the effect I was after! It is as if this area absorbs the renomat but it can't dry (I have left it to dry naturally over night and it remains the same). Gentle abrasion to the area seems to clear the dark patch, but everytime you put any product on it it returns to the picture above.

I am wondering now whether I might just dye the boots black, but I much prefer burgundy and is there is any way of fixing this then I would prefer to retain the burgundy?

Thanks in advance for any help.

I came upon this same issue in using Saphir Renovateur and polish on an old pair (a couple pages back). Based on the few responses I have received, the working theory is that those stains are a result of previous water damage, which has become pronounced through the application of conditioner and/or the wax. I'm a little skeptical of this, as up until my recently turn to Saphir I had routinely used Lexol on my pair without this result, but the case stands that my pair had seen extensive exposure to wet and snow. Based on the the location of the stains on your boots it seems reasonable that those would be concentrated areas of exposure, especially in snow. I have found no fix at present - stripping with Reno'Mat and building the polish back up through staged application has not yielded a better result.

The other possibility is that these boots were originally that color and were dyed a lighter brown. Did you apply the Reno'Mat outside those areas, and if so was pigment lifted/a similar color left behind?
post #17966 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirWilliam View Post

I managed to screw up this pair of JM Westons.

IMG_1037.JPG 1517k .JPG file

I went through my normal polish routine and then I thought I would add a little shine to the toe but my towel was too wet and now the right shoe (left in the picture) seems to be missing color.

This shoe came with a distressed look to it where the leather is lighter in choice spots but this is a bit too much and I don't have what I need to fix it seems as the JM Weston creme polish isn't dark enough and the Saphir dark brown is slightly better but still not giving me the result I need. How can I fix this?

 

   The pair you have posted , its leather is finished after the pair was made (spray finish and the leather wasnt dyed in that color in the first place)!! Its really easy to fix this !! 

1: Use 3-4 layers of paste polish to cover it up (Saphir or Cololonil dark brown 1909 polish(higher pigment concentration))

2: Use a dye preferably alcohol based 

3: Dark brown spray leather paint (too messy and i dont recommend it)

Quote:
Originally Posted by BoomDiggs View Post

Hopefully this is the right thread for this question. I just re-dyed some suede shoes. Any suggestions on how to keep the color from fainting rubbing off on things that contact the shoes?

 

Collonil colour stop or other similar product ll do the trick for you!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by whorishconsumer View Post


I came upon this same issue in using Saphir Renovateur and polish on an old pair (a couple pages back). Based on the few responses I have received, the working theory is that those stains are a result of previous water damage, which has become pronounced through the application of conditioner and/or the wax. I'm a little skeptical of this, as up until my recently turn to Saphir I had routinely used Lexol on my pair without this result, but the case stands that my pair had seen extensive exposure to wet and snow. Based on the the location of the stains on your boots it seems reasonable that those would be concentrated areas of exposure, especially in snow. I have found no fix at present - stripping with Reno'Mat and building the polish back up through staged application has not yielded a better result.

The other possibility is that these boots were originally that color and were dyed a lighter brown. Did you apply the Reno'Mat outside those areas, and if so was pigment lifted/a similar color left behind?

From the photos he have posted (if i remember correctly at your case also) the factory finish was striped off!!! 

 

 

Some general information about renomat!!! when you use this product dont rub with the cloth!! You apply the product you wait and then you just wipe it off!!!

 

I hope i helped i little bit :happy: 

post #17967 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

   The pair you have posted , its leather is finished after the pair was made (spray finish and the leather wasnt dyed in that color in the first place)!! Its really easy to fix this !! 
1: Use 3-4 layers of paste polish to cover it up (Saphir or Cololonil dark brown 1909 polish(higher pigment concentration))
2: Use a dye preferably alcohol based 
3: Dark brown spray leather paint (too messy and i dont recommend it)

Collonil colour stop or other similar product ll do the trick for you!!
From the photos he have posted (if i remember correctly at your case also) the factory finish was striped off!!! 


Some general information about renomat!!! when you use this product dont rub with the cloth!! You apply the product you wait and then you just wipe it off!!!

I hope i helped i little bit happy.gif  

Thank you, sir - I have not previously seen the policy of not rubbing, but given how abrasive Reno'Mat is, that makes sense. Thanks again.
post #17968 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick V. View Post


Thanks for sharing the web site. A few things though.....

The can of barge cement in the ordering area says "All Purpose Cement" He keeps saying "rubber cement" in the video. There is a big difference between the two. All purpose will work on sole guards. Rubber cement won't (it's not strong enough).

He used an oil treated leather sole in his demonstration. That's why the mini lug sole de-laminated from the leather sole. The oil actually will repel either cements. It may hold for a short period. Eventually with normal flexing it will come apart.

It's better to use a thin layer of all purpose cement on both sides then putting the cement on liberally.

The amount of pressure he applied by hammering the sole guard on and tying it down is not sufficient for a solid bond.

The sole and sole guard should both be sanded (roughed) in order to create a surface that would allow the cement to adhere properly.
It's more effective if you do this with a sanding machine.

 

Watching those videos is a bit cringe inducing and likely a good reason to develop a relationship with your local cobbler. If you don't have a local cobbler that you trust, send them to B. Nelson.

post #17969 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrick_b View Post
 

 

Watching those videos is a bit cringe inducing and likely a good reason to develop a relationship with your local cobbler. If you don't have a local cobbler that you trust, send them to B. Nelson.

 

Isn't Nick with B.Nelson?

post #17970 of 19044
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post
 

 

Isn't Nick with B.Nelson?


Yes he is, sorry if that wasn't clear. Not a knock on Nick but rather on the producer of the aforementioned vids.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › **The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.**