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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1195

post #17911 of 19067

I want to lower the tone. Reading about using conditioner on the inside of shoes made me think. I recently bought a pair of Dr Marten's boots. They are notoriously difficult to break in (although I haven't, particularly, noticed this]. A couple of days ago, taking a lead from this thread, I put some Renapur on the inside of the boots. The boots are not lined, so I was working on the inside part of the corrected grain. I now find they have quite a bit more 'give' in them and they are more comfortable - although I am aware that the placebo effect may be at work here.  I used my fingers to put the Renapur on. 

 

Renapur is made from Beeswax, Carnauba wax, Jojoba oil and Avocado oil, just in case you are wondering. Sincerely yours, Munky.

post #17912 of 19067

Interested to hear what others use on their linings.  I have never used anything on mine, but I have a couple of pairs that might benefit from a different finish as they are snug and seem to grip my socks as I get my foot in.

 

The liner leathers seem to nearly always be natural colour and highly absorbant, so I'm not sure how evenly products would go on.

post #17913 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by EnglishShoes View Post
 

Interested to hear what others use on their linings.  I have never used anything on mine, but I have a couple of pairs that might benefit from a different finish as they are snug and seem to grip my socks as I get my foot in.

 

The liner leathers seem to nearly always be natural colour and highly absorbant, so I'm not sure how evenly products would go on.

 

The point about Dr Marten's is that they aren't lined. I wouldn't think that product used on lined shoes would be a great idea! With lined shoes, there is (at least a potential) gap between liner and upper. What you do to the inners ain't going to do much to the outers. 

post #17914 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

I want to lower the tone. Reading about using conditioner on the inside of shoes made me think. I recently bought a pair of Dr Marten's boots. They are notoriously difficult to break in (although I haven't, particularly, noticed this]. A couple of days ago, taking a lead from this thread, I put some Renapur on the inside of the boots. The boots are not lined, so I was working on the inside part of the corrected grain. I now find they have quite a bit more 'give' in them and they are more comfortable - although I am aware that the placebo effect may be at work here.  I used my fingers to put the Renapur on. 

 

Renapur is made from Beeswax, Carnauba wax, Jojoba oil and Avocado oil, just in case you are wondering. Sincerely yours, Munky.

I would not use wax in the lining. Did not you buy any Lexol or B4 yet?.

post #17915 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

I would not use wax in the lining. Did not you buy any Lexol or B4 yet?.

 

Yes, I have Lexol. I was taking advice from the Dr Marten shop, where the staff recommended using their  Wonder Balm on the inside of their boots. Wonder Balm is much the same, in terms of content, to Renapur. I doubt that the boots will fall apart!  :) 

post #17916 of 19067

Liners hardly need any attention. If they get dry - which might take years and years - I put my cheapest moisturizer on them - maybe some old dubbin that's lying around. 

post #17917 of 19067

Sure, less is more, but I would never put any wax on liners.

post #17918 of 19067

Agreed, forget the polish and the cream. Unless you like to admire the inside of your shoes. 

 

Edit: actually I can't tell whether we agree or not. Maybe you think of dubbin as wax? Anyway, what I'm trying to say is that any product which has a moisturizing effect is OK. It might call itself dubbin, conditioner, saddle soap or something else. It may have some sort of wax in it. If it does, so what? So long as it's not polish. Polish gradually dries the leather.


Edited by ShoeWho - 3/9/16 at 11:55am
post #17919 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapasman View Post
 

Sure, less is more, but I would never put any wax on liners.

 

As I have tried to say, ad nauseum, these boots don't have 'liners'. The inside of the boots are the back of the uppers. I wouldn't see any reason to condition 'liners'.

post #17920 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

As I have tried to say, ad nauseum, these boots don't have 'liners'. The inside of the boots are the back of the uppers. I wouldn't see any reason to condition 'liners'.

 I know Munky, let´s say I would not put any wax inside of my shoes.  But no big deal.:)And once in a life time I condition my linings and insole.

post #17921 of 19067

Often is the case in shoe care that "less is more". There are some people in this thread that will destroy their shoes through over care. 

post #17922 of 19067

I've noticed the finish on the edging of these C&J Lowndes is flaking a bit, is this the factory wax coat? And is this usual?  Do I need to apply more wax, renovateur or something like edge dressing?

 

 

post #17923 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCK1 View Post
 

Often is the case in shoe care that "less is more". There are some people in this thread that will destroy their shoes through over care. 

 

I'm well aware of the idea of 'less is more' and certainly won't be one of those of those that 'will destroy their shoes through over care'. 

post #17924 of 19067

That patch looks a bit rough. I doubt that moisturizing will make it smooth again, but it's worth a try. It it doesn't, you can use emery paper on the rough bits, being very careful to sand the absolute minimum necessary.  Then I'd use polish or edge dressing to get a colour match. 

 

Edit: actually I think sanding might be overkill, because the bumpy/flakey bits probably aren't leather, they're just the manufacturer's original coating. So the bumpy/flakey bits may well come off if you apply some thinner with a cloth and then rub. Nail polish remover or Saphir Decapant are two possible thinners, but lots of other things would work, we don't need anything fancy when we're working on the edge of the sole. 


Edited by ShoeWho - 3/10/16 at 7:02am
post #17925 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by WillisAU View Post
 

I've noticed the finish on the edging of these C&J Lowndes is flaking a bit, is this the factory wax coat? And is this usual?  Do I need to apply more wax, renovateur or something like edge dressing?

 

 

This is due to the compression and flexing!! Nothing to worry about!!! 

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