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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1194

post #17896 of 19067

They come up on ebay in the UK about once a week, but I've never seen any in such good condition. To have the original studs is so rare that it might even be unique. The maker's name is stamped on the inside: C.W. Horrell Ltd., started by this chap: http://www.rushdenheritage.co.uk/people/Horrellfamily.html

 

I don't know who the original owner is because I bought them from a militaria dealer. I've hunted for more info on the web, and they seem to have been unique to the Ordnance Corps, worn by British and Canadian officers. There's a story that they were not popular, but I don't know why. 

 

Despite the age the leather is as supple as a brand new pair of boots. It's amazing really. That's why I'm tempted to soak them.  But I think I'll show them to JF's favourite cobbler before I do anything. I'm concerned that the nails might start popping out or that the layers of leather in the sole and heel might separate from each other. 

post #17897 of 19067

I agree with the previous replies. Send them to a cobbler and let him/her apply mechanical pressure with a shoe tree inserted to bend the toe back to its original shape. If the leather is in good condition a normal shoe care should be a sufficient procedure to restore them.

post #17898 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoeWho View Post
 

They come up on ebay in the UK about once a week, but I've never seen any in such good condition. To have the original studs is so rare that it might even be unique. The maker's name is stamped on the inside: C.W. Horrell Ltd., started by this chap: http://www.rushdenheritage.co.uk/people/Horrellfamily.html

 

I don't know who the original owner is because I bought them from a militaria dealer. I've hunted for more info on the web, and they seem to have been unique to the Ordnance Corps, worn by British and Canadian officers. There's a story that they were not popular, but I don't know why. 

 

Despite the age the leather is as supple as a brand new pair of boots. It's amazing really. That's why I'm tempted to soak them.  But I think I'll show them to JF's favourite cobbler before I do anything. I'm concerned that the nails might start popping out or that the layers of leather in the sole and heel might separate from each other. 

 

I'd consider donating them to a military museum or similar if the boots complete with studs are rare.  I'm all for using things for their intended purpose (I have an old BMW that is somewhat rare, but I drive it without thoughts of wear/tear/miles), but it would be kind of a shame if they are unique for that level of originality and condition.  See if a museum will trade you for a pair you can have some fun with :)

 

Just my (unsolicited) $0.02

post #17899 of 19067

I thought about that, but the museums here, judging by their web sites, seem to have plenty of these boots. And they seem to like ones with some history, boots which have clearly seen some action, with an identified owner. And maybe unused pairs are not as rare as I thought - look what's just appeared on ebay!  http://r.ebay.com/vuYOb6  Same boot, sake maker, without studs, with even less wear than my pair (And less toe curl!)

 

This afternoon I showed mine to the famous Tony, allegedly London's best cobbler http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/2013/04/my-recommended-shoe-cobbler.html. His verdict was that a soak probably wouldn't do any harm, but he doesn't think it will reduce the curl. So I'm going to give it a try - nothing to lose, and it should be a learning experience. 

post #17900 of 19067

Hi - First post. I have soaked many vintage shoes. I have found no long term problems with the method. It sounds wrong but it has worked for me. That said, past performance is no guarantee of future results. I have a post on the method on my shoe blog. With photos no less.

http://vcleat.com/reshaping-shoes-with-water-and-heat/

post #17901 of 19067
There's a difference between built in toe curl and toe curl from wear and time.
post #17902 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post

There's a difference between built in toe curl and toe curl from wear and time.

You think the cobbler was essentially telling him it was the former? I read it that he was saying the curl has a decades-long head start.

I'd guess it is some of both. I don't know anything about soaking.

Is the goal to wear the shoes? Regularly?
post #17903 of 19067

I'm new to the leather conditioning game. Before, I only applied shoe cream to polish every once in a while. So now, I actually wonder between two options: Saphir Renovateur or Chamberlain's Leather Milk No. 1. Both are said to be cleaner and conditioner. Which one is better? 

post #17904 of 19067

Hi all,

 

I have 2 pairs of calf shoes incoming, and I have read a lot about conditioning with Bick 4 in this thread, so I ordered a bottle of bick4 too. However I realized that there is no detailed protocol for the application of bick4. Shall I use it as I apply shoe creams or is there some different trick?

 

I also read that @DWFII recommended using bick4 on insoles and linings too, how is that done? apply with hand? I have only applied renovateur on the linings of my suede boots before (with fingers).

 

Thanks in advance!:happy: 

post #17905 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by manasdirge View Post

Hi all,

I have 2 pairs of calf shoes incoming, and I have read a lot about conditioning with Bick 4 in this thread, so I ordered a bottle of bick4 too. However I realized that there is no detailed protocol for the application of bick4. Shall I use it as I apply shoe creams or is there some different trick?

I also read that @DWFII
 recommended using bick4 on insoles and linings too, how is that done? apply with hand? I have only applied renovateur on the linings of my suede boots before (with fingers).

Thanks in advance!happy.gif  

Put a little on a cloth and spread it around. You'll get an idea of how much you can put on. It's a great product.
post #17906 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by manasdirge View Post


I also read that @DWFII
 recommended using bick4 on insoles and linings too, how is that done? apply with hand? I have only applied renovateur on the linings of my suede boots before (with fingers).

Yes, put it on with your hands. It's the leather you want to apply it to, not a cloth...what is absorbed by the cloth will not be readily available to be absorbed by the leather. And the cloth doesn't need it or benefit at all.

What's more, the warmth from your hands will help it to penetrate.
post #17907 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post


Put a little on a cloth and spread it around. You'll get an idea of how much you can put on. It's a great product.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DWFII View Post


Yes, put it on with your hands. It's the leather you want to apply it to, not a cloth...what is absorbed by the cloth will not be readily available to be absorbed by the leather. And the cloth doesn't need it or benefit at all.

What's more, the warmth from your hands will help it to penetrate.

Thanks for the prompt replies, guess I will figure out how much I need to apply. BTW, if I would like use shoe creams/polish on them, how long shall I leave them after the Bick 4 is applied?

post #17908 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by manasdirge View Post


Thanks for the prompt replies, guess I will figure out how much I need to apply. BTW, if I would like use shoe creams/polish on them, how long shall I leave them after the Bick 4 is applied?

Well, don't leave any globs or puddles or residue on the leather. All conditioners should be applied sparingly.

As for creams or polish, don't use them inside the shoe. And on the outside, simply wait until the shoe is dry to the touch.

Take heart. It's not all that complicated...although there are surely some who would wish to make it so.

--
Edited by DWFII - 3/8/16 at 7:32am
post #17909 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by manasdirge View Post
 

 

 

Thanks for the prompt replies, guess I will figure out how much I need to apply. BTW, if I would like use shoe creams/polish on them, how long shall I leave them after the Bick 4 is applied?

 

If you use bick4 (hands or cloth, I just think two fingers and a cloth is a little cleaner and spreads better), wait about 10 minutes for it to absorb and dry. You'll see almost instantly how much Bick4 you need to use for a given area. Start with a marble-sized glop of oil and then go from there. 

 

For cream polish, be sure to let it sit and dry for 7-10 minutes before buffing off with either a cloth or brush, whichever you prefer. 

post #17910 of 19067
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post


You think the cobbler was essentially telling him it was the former? I read it that he was saying the curl has a decades-long head start.

I'd guess it is some of both. I don't know anything about soaking.

Is the goal to wear the shoes? Regularly?

I didn't ask. But I reckon he said it because the boots obviously have some built-in curl (as you can see there's almost no wrinkling) and the soles are extremely thick - half an inch of leather is quite a lot to be reshaping.

 

So I did the soak earlier today and it was successful at reducing the curl. It's now like the right boot from the ebay link I posted before, which I reckon is how a new boot would have been made http://r.ebay.com/vuYOb6 .  But in other respects the new shape is wrong so I'll be doing the soak again. This is how it goes sometimes - when the trees aren't a close fit the shape of the wet shoe can be a bit hit and miss. But it doesn't matter, soaking can be done again and again without harm, so long as you handle the shoes carefully while they are soft and wet and fragile.

 

Being new here I'm a little surprised that soaking isn't discussed that much - it seems to me that it's one of our basic tools, just as much as a glacage. ( And I'd say it's a lot easier than a glacage.) It was J.Fitzpatrick's blog where I first learned about it.  http://www.theshoesnobblog.com/2012/06/restoring-old-shoes.html   All the pro refurbishers just have to be doing it. If you limit yourself to heat and stretching, and you don't get a factory rebuild on the original last, you can't get results like this   http://www.dandyshoecare.it/ENG/treatments.html  or this http://www.jfitzpatrickfootwear.com/pages/recraft-services

 

Here's my current shape. Toe curl is halved but the right boot has a twisted sole and the left one is too straight on the left edge just behind the toe.

 

 

P.S. As for the goal...I can't decide. I won't make up my mind until I've made them as beautiful as I can. 

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