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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1189

post #17821 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


I never polish in closed spaces.

And if I am using acetone, renomat, dye prep, dye, etc, it will always be outdoors with protected gloves and masks.

It might cause cancer and it might not. Not everyone has the same risk profile for different cancers.

 

I can't tolerate any polish with Turpentine in it. The mucous membranes in my mouth and throat take a beating and I get very breathless. This rules out a lot of Saphir products and - by extension - other products. I mostly avoid them or use them, when I can, outside of the house. 

 

Products that I find OK in this respect are GlenKaren polishes, Saphir Creme Universelle, Saphir Renovateur, Renapur, Oliver Sweeney's Brush Up, It is difficult to know whether a product contains Turpentine until you get it. I have found that, once I have found a product that doesn't fall into this category, I tend to stick with it. Thus I use Brush Up for a quick polish and GlenKaren for a deeper shine. Also use, although not very often, Lexol conditioner. Most of all though, I brush!

post #17822 of 19038

As far as I know Burgol does not use chemicals in their shoe creams and waxes. I have been using both for a while now and am very pleased, actually their creams have a very nice scent to them. Not sure, however, if those are available in NA or outside Europe.

post #17823 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

I can't tolerate any polish with Turpentine in it. The mucous membranes in my mouth and throat take a beating and I get very breathless. This rules out a lot of Saphir products and - by extension - other products. I mostly avoid them or use them, when I can, outside of the house. 

 

Products that I find OK in this respect are GlenKaren polishes, Saphir Creme Universelle, Saphir Renovateur, Renapur, Oliver Sweeney's Brush Up, It is difficult to know whether a product contains Turpentine until you get it. I have found that, once I have found a product that doesn't fall into this category, I tend to stick with it. Thus I use Brush Up for a quick polish and GlenKaren for a deeper shine. Also use, although not very often, Lexol conditioner. Most of all though, I brush!

GlenKaren products are incredible. I recently discovered the brand. After using some condtioner/cleaner on a few pairs of my EGs, they look spectacular! Plus, the nice orange scent makes it a more meditative, pleasant experience to polish/clean/condition your shoes. I have yet to try the polish, but I look forward to that as well. The thread on GlenKaren's product all praise highly of the products too. You can't complain when you're dealing with all natural ingredients that make the shoe look wonderful :)

post #17824 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post

Thank you. I have resolved to relish the stain and its history (which involved a very fine bottle of Italian wine). Asymmetry is the foundation of great art.

You could go the other direction and paint the shoes with wine... It might be more uniform? nest.gif
post #17825 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trqmaster View Post

You could go the other direction and paint the shoes with wine... It might be more uniform? nest.gif

I'm already doing a damn fine job of this. Witness my Grenson Masterpieces:



Maybe I should just stick to burgundy shoes?
post #17826 of 19038

Atia, you may want to review the wisdom of drinking two bottles of wine a night. Or wear Wellington boots.  :smarmy:

post #17827 of 19038
Drinking galoshes - a shoe care accessory for the most discerning gentleman.
post #17828 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by rbhan12 View Post

Reno if you're trying to clean/condition first. Spread around the whole shoe with a dauber or cloth, wait ~5 min or so until the shoe becomes product dries and becomes opaque, then brush off with a buffing brush. Then use your cream polish with dauber brush or cloth and spread around the whole shoe. Again, wait ~5min until the cream properly dries and turns opaque, then brush off with a buffing brush. Then wax and water for high shine specifically on the toe.

Justin FitzPatrick aka The Shoe Snob has an excellent video on youtube re: mirror shine, which is attached below. Follow this and you should be good! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPhqQEdhtxI

Just want to bump this very helpful advice. Thanks rbhan!
post #17829 of 19038

Hey guys,

 

Just bought some new shoes, but I don't want to return them ( lazy).

 

Theres some pretty major heel slippage, is there a way to get around that? Any simple fixes? Or should I go with the return.

 

Regards,

Jason

post #17830 of 19038
Return. Insoles will fill volume to an extent, but you also have to account for stretch which will basically counter any progress made by insoles. If the slippage was very minor and the overall aspects of the shoe were not loose I'd say maybe keep them, but from what you're saying I think you'll regret keeping them.
Edited by whorishconsumer - 2/26/16 at 11:26pm
post #17831 of 19038

thanks, yeah i'm exchanging now. thanks tho

post #17832 of 19038
Is there any concern for applying Saphir Renovateur to a shoe that has protectant already applied? I have some Common Projects i'd like to condition some but they have been treated with some Jason Markk Repel (that's a whole of trendy footwear brands all in in a row).
Edited by whorishconsumer - 2/26/16 at 11:25pm
post #17833 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by benhour View Post

Let them sit and dry !! generally you have to have in mind that on tan shoes tend to occur this type of patina!! 

Sorry - I just realized I never replied to this. Thank you for your input. After some critical observation I have to come to suspect that the polishing brush I was using may have residual black dyes from when I last used the brush 5 + years ago. I'm going to strip and re-polish the shoes with a new brush this weekend and see if that improves matters.

Thanks again.
post #17834 of 19038
Quote:
Originally Posted by whorishconsumer View Post

Return. Insoles will fill volume to an extent, but you also have to account for stretch which will basically counter any progress made by insoles. If the slippage was very minor and the over aspects of the shoe were not loose I'd say maybe keep them, but from what you're saying I think you'll regret keeping them.

Yeah I thought so too but my one pair of Leeds never stretched and always kept pinching my pinky toe. Had to exchange them in the end. The other pair in the same size however did stretch and is fine now... I'd say as always: It depends smile.gif
post #17835 of 19038

Crosspost from the Edward Green Appreciation Thread:

 

Gentlemen,

 

I would love to receive your input when you read this. How do you store your shoes? Do you keep them in shoe bags + box or do you keep them open on a shoe rack of some sort? I've been debating which one would be better for the longevity and health of the shoe...

 

Another factor that gets me a bit concerned about leaving the shoes out in the air on the shoe racks is the heat in my house... our house is always at at least 78 degrees fahrenheit (~26 degrees celsius). Perhaps leaving the shoes out exposed in that temperature may be bad for the shoes?

 

I'd love your input at your earliest convenience, gentlemen! Much appreciated in advance!

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