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**The Official Shoe Care Thread: Tutorials, Photos, etc.** - Page 1182

post #17716 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by LGHT View Post
 

Thanks for the link they are helpful and will definitely fill my free time at the office with some well needing reading.  However I was hoping to get some more direct feedback in regards to kit's that include polish and brushes like this one.  http://www.amazon.com/Footfitter-Exclusive-Shine-Valet-Deluxe/dp/B00BGD8G2E/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1454958053&sr=8-1&keywords=saphir+cream

 

 

Not really what you need in my opinion, some superfluous things and other essentials missing. 

 

Horsehair Brush (the longer one)

Horsehair Dauber/Welt Brush 

Bick4 or Lexol Conditioner 

Cream Polish

Wax Polish 

 

Pretty much it. 

 

The kit on Hanger Project is the best I've seen. 

 

https://www.hangerproject.com/saphir-shoeshine-starter-kit.html

post #17717 of 19073
*double post 
post #17718 of 19073

Personally, I'd get several of the bigger brushes.  One for daily brushing before/after wearing, one for shoe care on brown shoes and one for black shoes (assuming you have both).  When you're brushing after applying polish, you don't want black and brown polishes to mix.

post #17719 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mcbeck View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by atia2 View Post

I approach the village elders with a tale of woe. My otherwise delightful Edward Green Malverns sustained the injury below in an unfortunate nightclubbing incident. They are, however, soft of sole and will imminently need some kind of attention in any case. Therefore, I am wondering whether the good cordwainers of Northampton might be able to work their magic on this nasty nick, or whether a full recraft on such a badly scarred shoe is throwing good money after bad.



 



Has anyone tried the Sapphir Repair Cream for these type of scratches?

https://www.hangerproject.com/saphir-renovating-recolorant-repair-cream.html
I have. I scratched a black toe cap under a corner of a door getting out of a particularly small toilet stall.

It filled up the scratch nicely. I can still see where the scratch was when holding the shoe in my hand but not when I'm wearing them so good enough for me.
post #17720 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

I have asked this question on another thread and would welcome comments.

I have two pairs of Tricker's Bourton brogues. They are beautiful shoes but the soles are so thick, I can't get them to bend. As a result, the shoes seem never to wear in. One pair is about 18 months old and the other one year. It's as if the soles are too heavy for the uppers. I don't plan to do press ups in them but can anyone suggest things I could try?  Thanks, as always, Munky. 

Double leather sole? Danite? Commando?

My Danite sole Stow (boot version of Bourton) took a very long time to break in. Don't think much could be done for the rubber soles.

Double leather soles breaks in much faster if you wet the outsole slightly.
post #17721 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Double leather sole? Danite? Commando?

My Danite sole Stow (boot version of Bourton) took a very long time to break in. Don't think much could be done for the rubber soles.

Double leather soles breaks in much faster if you wet the outsole slightly.

 

Thank you very much for this, Chogall. The soles are leather and I will give the water a go. 

post #17722 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post

Thank you very much for this, Chogall. The soles are leather and I will give the water a go. 

Conditioner works as well.

Double sole shoes aren't designed to be very flexible initially and takes much longer time to break-in.

But they sure are very durable!!

Also, metal toe taps works wonders for dibble leather sole. Double sole shoes have accelerated toe wear due to the rocking motion of thick outsoles.
post #17723 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by chogall View Post


Conditioner works as well.

Double sole shoes aren't designed to be very flexible initially and takes much longer time to break-in.

But they sure are very durable!!

Also, metal toe taps works wonders for dibble leather sole. Double sole shoes have accelerated toe wear due to the rocking motion of thick outsoles.

 

What surprised me is how quickly the rubber heel pieces wore down on my first pair of Trickerss. I had to have them replaced after a few months of very light wear. They were worn to just above the heel stack.

post #17724 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by LGHT View Post

Can anyone suggest a good beginner shoe "kit".  In the past I would buy $50 shoes every 6 months and just wear them until they look too ugly and get a new pair.  Now I have a few really nice pairs of shoes and haven't done anything to them since I've purchased them.  They all came with shoe trees and bags that I store them in, but they look really "dull" compared to when I pulled them out of the box. 

I'm reading a lot and realizing I should be treating them a lot better.  I have several items in my amazon cart, but not sure if the money will be better spent on just getting a "kit" or at least start with a nice kit and add on to that.

Check out the Shoe Snob kit. HERE.
and his how to video: HERE.
post #17725 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

What surprised me is how quickly the rubber heel pieces wore down on my first pair of Trickerss. I had to have them replaced after a few months of very light wear. They were worn to just above the heel stack.

 

You are right, Chogall, about the wearing down of the toe part of the sole of Tricker Boughton. I had a look at the two pairs I have and both have worn down very considerably. Both pairs have seen only light wear and worn about once a fortnight - perhaps even less frequently. I can't imagine what they would look like if I wore them every other day, to walk to work in them.. 

 

It strikes me that Tricker Boughton's do not offer much value for money. Having had the rubber part of the sole repaired already, I think I am now looking at a sole replacement in the next few months. This is in shoes that are less than a year old. If I go for a Tricker refit, I am looking at nearly a quarter of the cost of the new shoes. It is ironic that such a sturdy shoe should wear out so quickly and easily. I have a pair of Loake Chesters which were almost half the price of the Boughton's. They are over three years old and haven't needed to see the inside of a cobbler's shop since I bought them. 

post #17726 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by M635Guy View Post
 

Personally, I'd get several of the bigger brushes.  One for daily brushing before/after wearing, one for shoe care on brown shoes and one for black shoes (assuming you have both).  When you're brushing after applying polish, you don't want black and brown polishes to mix.

 

I actually a dark brown boot, 2 black shoes, a black boot, 1 dark blue, and 1 brown suede.   Can I use a single brush for daily brushing before and after wearing on the different colors or does each color need a daily brush AND a cleaning brush?  

post #17727 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trqmaster View Post


Check out the Shoe Snob kit. HERE.
and his how to video: HERE.

 

Thanks for the tips.  I love the video.  So far I've been reading a lot, but it's nice to see a good video also.

post #17728 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by LGHT View Post
 

 

I actually a dark brown boot, 2 black shoes, a black boot, 1 dark blue, and 1 brown suede.   Can I use a single brush for daily brushing before and after wearing on the different colors or does each color need a daily brush AND a cleaning brush?  

 

I tend to use one brush for brushing all my shoes before I go and when I come back. The exception to this is a second brush which I use for a pair of red shoes that bleed a lot of red colour. Otherwise, one, big brush, tends to be fine for buffing. 

 

I use multiple brushes for use with polishing - one for each colour shoes (or almost; I tend to use the same brush for all brown and tan shoes). On balance, though, keep it simple!  it can all get out of control!

post #17729 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by Munky View Post
 

 

I tend to use one brush for brushing all my shoes before I go and when I come back. The exception to this is a second brush which I use for a pair of red shoes that bleed a lot of red colour. Otherwise, one, big brush, tends to be fine for buffing. 

 

I use multiple brushes for use with polishing - one for each colour shoes (or almost; I tend to use the same brush for all brown and tan shoes). On balance, though, keep it simple!  it can all get out of control!


I guess it depends on the colour of your shoes and the polish that you use. I tend to use a cotton cloth to give my a shoes a wipe and then just polish them.

 

Again, agreeing with Munky - one brush for each colour, although I have two brushes for brown because I use two different types of polish. The less brushes you have, the better - you spend less money and don't have to worry where to put them. 

post #17730 of 19073
Quote:
Originally Posted by LGHT View Post
 

 

I actually a dark brown boot, 2 black shoes, a black boot, 1 dark blue, and 1 brown suede.   Can I use a single brush for daily brushing before and after wearing on the different colors or does each color need a daily brush AND a cleaning brush?  

 

I use the same brush for the daily brushing, and then have a couple brushes for tan and non-tan shoes for use when polishing.  The dark shoes won't really be affected by contamination, but a tan shoe might show some dark polish if the brush has that in it.  

 

At $15 for a good 8" brush, it doesn't seem excessive.

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